Wwii Unexploded Bomb

Discussion in 'In the News' started by Terry Page, Sep 3, 2017.

  1. Terry Page

    Terry Page Very Well-Known Member
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    I know unexploded WWII bombs are still being found, but didn't realise the sheer numbers and the scale of the operations dealing with them..

    LINK

    An average of about 2,000 tonnes of unexploded ordnance are found each year in Germany. It's estimated that about half the 2.7 million tonnes of bombs dropped by Allied powers during World War Two landed on German soil (compared to about 74,000 tonnes of bombs dropped on the UK by Germany). Many of the bombs were equipped with malfunctioning time-delay fuses, and many never went off.

    Adding to the problem are Russian artillery shells, German hand grenades and tank mines, as well as Russian munitions from training facilities in post-war East Germany.

    The problem is so widespread that Germany has a bomb-disposal unit, the Kampfmittelbeseitigungsdienst (KMBD), dedicated to the problem. Its technicians are among the busiest in the world, deactivating a bomb every two weeks or so - and they estimate their work will continue for decades to come.



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    About 65,000 people must leave their homes and police have said they will imprison anyone who refuses to go.
    It is Germany's biggest post-war evacuation. A smaller one took place on Saturday in Koblenz.
    In the city 110km (68 miles) west of Frankfurt, 22,000 people had to leave their homes for four hours while experts disposed of a World War Two bomb that had been found during preparations for building a new kindergarten.
    Thousands of unexploded bombs from the war are still found in Germany every year.
    Last month a kindergarten was evacuated after the teacher found an unexploded World War Two bomb on a shelf. Police said a child had found it on a woodland walk and brought it inside.

    Dozens of bomb-disposal technicians and hundreds of civilians died from uncontrolled explosions in the decades following the war. The rate of fatalities has slowed since, with 11 technicians said to have been killed in Germany since 2000.

    But experts warn that the devices that remain could be getting more unstable as the munitions age and their fuses grow more brittle, and as bombs are discovered in more built-up, harder-to-reach areas.

    The problem is also worse in certain parts of Germany. Oranienburg, just outside Berlin, has the dubious distinction of being the "most dangerous town in Germany". Under Adolf Hitler, it contained an armaments hub, aircraft plant, railway junction and a nuclear research facility - so it was a key target for the Allies, who gave it an aerial pounding. Almost 200 bombs have been defused in the town since the end of the war, and residents are well-drilled in the evacuation procedure. But with experts estimating that some 350-400 bombs remain buried, the task is far from complete.
     
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  2. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    I too am shocked every time I hear another has been found as it happens so often
     
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  3. Gary Ridenour

    Gary Ridenour Very Well-Known Member
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    including the machines that fire them

    [​IMG]

    and in Japan

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    all over the world. new housing construction usually turns up something. ammo, bombs and remains. including mass graves. North sea storms uncover this stuff as well as bunkers from Hitler's wall
     
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  4. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
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    Shocking isn't it?...You would have thought that places like the UK and Germany which were heavily bombed and were reconstructed post war would have been cleared of most incendiary devices during the rebuilds...

    The houses here on the edge of North London were not built until the Mid 50's... all on farmland, but even now as recently of January this year Incendiary Bombs are still being found in the area on undeveloped farmland..


    6No. suspected WWII German Incendiary Bombs (IBs) have been found by an amateur archaeologist on the 240 acre farmland owned by xxxx






    IBs were dropped in huge numbers during WWII, falling in clusters in an attempt to start conflagrations around important strategic targets upon which the next wave of Luftwaffe bombers could drop their High Explosive (HE) devices.





    The small amount of HE filling in incendiary devices means that they have a very small potential of remaining active after more than 70 years in the ground, with the thermite filling typically having degraded.




    Still, better safe than sorry, and an Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) team was duly called out to examine the devices and remove them for safe disposal.
     
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  5. Gary Ridenour

    Gary Ridenour Very Well-Known Member
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    [​IMG]

    an old photo I took when I served on an Ammo ship. those are either 500 or 1000 ponders. some of these could be un- exploded in Vietnam to. who knows. these were for aircraft
     
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  6. Gary Ridenour

    Gary Ridenour Very Well-Known Member
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    just in. they just found an un-exploded one in Frankfurt. big enough they say to flatten a city block. 60,000 evacuated. this is dated 1 hour ago.

    FRANKFURT - German explosives experts defused a massive World War Two bomb in the financial capital of Frankfurt on Sunday after tens of thousands of people were evacuated from their homes.
    More than 2,000 tonnes of live bombs and munitions are discovered each year in Germany, more than 70 years after the end of the war.
    British and American warplanes pummeled the country with 1.5 million tonnes of bombs that killed 600,000 people. Officials estimate that 15 percent of the bombs failed to explode, some burrowing six meters (20 feet) deep.

    http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/world...r7Dfo?li=BBnb7Kz&OCID=HPDHP#image=AAr7Dfo_1|4
     
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  7. Terry Page

    Terry Page Very Well-Known Member
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  8. Gary Ridenour

    Gary Ridenour Very Well-Known Member
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    OK Terry I didn't make the connection
     
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