What Is This Weed?

Discussion in 'Crops & Gardens' started by Ken Anderson, May 23, 2016.

  1. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    This is a weed that grows along my fence. I've been here since 2000, and I first started seeing these only a few years ago. Since they are growing along the fence and they aren't exactly ugly, I have let them grow but I don't know what they are. Any ideas?

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  2. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    Well the good news is that it is not Poison Ivy. :)http://www.weedalert.com/

    Hope that link helps you identify your weed. If my internet connection was better I would probably be able to name it.
     
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    Last edited: May 26, 2016
  3. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    The picture looks like it has little berries on it. Does it actually have berries, @Ken Anderson ? If so, what color are the berries when ripe, and what color are the blossoms when it blooms ?
    It looks really similar to a huckleberry the way that the leaves are, but if it was that, you would know it since huckleberries and blueberries are a lot alike, but these leaves seem longer and widen out differently than a huckleberry leaf does.
    Have you ever tasted a berry from these bushes?
     
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  4. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    I seem to remember small red berries but, if at all, they did not look like they were edible.
     
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  5. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    This is a barberry thicket...that reminds me of your weeds.

    jbarberrythicket.JPG
     
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  6. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    That looks very much like it. It's too early in the year yet but I am pretty sure they had yellow flowers and then small red berries, but ones that didn't look like they'd be edible. They seem to like growing out of piles of leaves that I raked along the fence. I wouldn't mind my back yard growing into a thicket since I wouldn't have to mow it. Well, maybe I would. I can imagine trying to find the cat. They are supposed to grow in subtropical zones, though. Strange.

    According to Wikipedia, some barberry species, the European barberry (berberis vulgarism) and the American barberry (berberis canadensis), native to Appalachia and the Midwest) can host a grass-infecting rust fungus, and was nearly eradicated for this reason, and is now rarely seen.

    These plants appeared after we had lived up north for three spring/summer/fall seasons in a row and, at the same time, much of our lawn had turned to moss, which is green at times but rust-colored when it doesn't get enough rain.
     
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    Last edited: Jun 2, 2016
  7. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    http://bangordailynews.com/2014/06/...-invasive-plants-in-maine-is-a-full-time-job/

    You might find this very interesting....
     
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  8. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    Thanks. I hadn't noticed anything eating the berries and, in the past few year that it's been here, it hasn't spread from that one area along the fence, but I'll watch it closely this summer to see if I can figure it out. I'm pretty sure that it is a barberry now though, so it's a matter of the species.
     
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  9. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    Poison ivy showed up at about the same time. We had moved up north during the growing season for three years in a row, coming back just to mow the lawn a couple of times a month. That's when this particular weed showed up, and I also found that we had poison ivy growing on a tree that I had cut down in the center of our lawn, and along our fence on three sides. I think I got rid of the poison ivy though, or at least pretty much so. The good news there is that I have never reacted to poison ivy so I could pull it up by the roots, although it required some digging as well.
     
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  10. Chris Ladewig

    Chris Ladewig Well-Known Member
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    It looks like barberry to me too. Does it have thorns?
     
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  11. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    Yeah, sharp little thorns. Looking online, it seems to be as evenly recommended for landscaping purposes, as warned against as an invasive species.
     
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  12. Chris Ladewig

    Chris Ladewig Well-Known Member
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    Yes it is barberry and can be invasive if not closely controlled.
     
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  13. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    It looks like a barberry. They should be cut back some or will take over. The birds like to eat the berries.
     
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    Last edited: Jun 2, 2016
  14. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    It sounds like you have the exact opposite problem of the one that we have, @Ken Anderson . I was grumbling in another thread that because we feed the birds and squirrels, they now all hang out here in our yard, and they also eat any other fruit and berries that we are trying to grow for our own use.
    You also feed birds, and apparently, your birds have found some of the barberries elsewhere and ate them, and then came to your yard for their next meal, and left bird-droppings with barberry seeds along the fenceline.
    If they were in the yard, you probably kept them mowed so the barberry plants didn't have much chance to grow and spread; but along the fenceline, then they were able to grow.
    Even if you get rid of these plants, your helpful little birdie friends will undoubtedly bring more seeds and "plant" them for you each fall.

    Looking at your pictures again, it does look like you might have some poison ivy there along the fence as well.

    Edit to add: it looks like the berries are not only edible, but have lots of vitamin C, and other medicinal uses, according to this website.
    http://www.home-remedies-for-you.com/herbs/barberry.html
     
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    Last edited: Jun 2, 2016
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  15. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    I kind of like it so I am not going to be too quick to remove it.
     
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  16. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    If you can keep it contained in the area you want it...then there should be no problem. :)
     
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  17. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    I think that is the same weed that is growing in our extended garden that we usually eradicate by pulling the roots when they are young. When fully grown, the small branches are tough so we need a cutter or a bolo to chop it. They have no use for us except for the goats. However, it can be a good decoration for the garden if you would care to give it a regular trimming. The shape of the small leaves are nice to look at. Unfortunately, we don't have a name for it.
     
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    Last edited: Jun 2, 2016
  18. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    Okay, next question. Although I don't think this plant looks like a weed, it's not something that we planted, at least not here, growing among our onions. It may be a plant that the squirrels relocated because, in return for food throughout the year, our squirrels have offered their landscaping and garden planning services, and often decide that a bulb plant might look better in a location other than where we planted it. A couple of roses turned up amongst our beans last year, but its in their nature for wild roses to move around. That's awfully kind of them but I do wish they'd consult with us first. Anyhow, this doesn't look like a weed but I know we didn't plant it among the onions. The leaves are velvety and the stems are reddish in color. So far, it hasn't flowered and we didn't plant any non-vegetables that wouldn't flower.

    mystery1plant.jpg mystery2plant.jpg mystery3plant.jpg mystery4plant.jpg mystery5plant.jpg
     
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  19. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    This is the same plant that I asked about last year. It survived the winter and was still green when the snow melted away from it. Now that it has grown, I can see that it's a vine. The leaves and stems are velvety, I think that's the term - fuzzy. It just showed up in our garden last year. I let it live, so it has gotten bigger this year.

    070117-UNKNOWNPLANT.jpg
     
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  20. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    I have been puzzling about this strange vine, and searched for any description that I thought might bring up a picture of it. The closest picture I found was this bit of vine. If this is it, you have some kind of a hardy kiwi. Maybe one of your neighbors has one and the squirrels or birds ate some of the fruit ? Otherwise, it is not apt to just sprout up because they are certainly not native.
    If it is a kiwi, it might grow for a few years before you see anything on it, similar to a grape vine.
    Please keep us updated with pictures as it grows !

    IMG_0653.JPG
     
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  21. Gloria Mitchell

    Gloria Mitchell Very Well-Known Member
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  22. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    Yeah, I have been ripping the poison ivy out of the ground for a few years now but it's hard to eradicate. Fortunately, I don't react to poison ivy so I can putt it up with my hands.

    No, it doesn't look like that.
    velvet-leaf-senna.jpg
     
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    Last edited: Jul 8, 2017
  23. Kalvin Mitnic

    Kalvin Mitnic Well-Known Member
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    If you cant smoke it or make brownies sorry, I don't care...;)
     
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