Waiting For My Wife's Slow Progress

Discussion in 'Food & Drinks' started by Frank Sanoica, Sep 4, 2016.

  1. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    At Smiths, today, owned by Kroger, I spotted a freezer compartment with what could only be DUCKS in one bin! Growing up, we had roast duck about once a month, delicious it was, I loved the fact that there was no white meat, and the toasted, singed skin containing it's layer of delicious, juicy fat underneath it, was retained.

    NOTHING tasted quite as good. Served with Bohemian dumplings, cut up into bite size pieces, smothered with sauerkraut or sweet-sour cabbage, then doused with the "drippins" from the fowl, was a mid-European treat unequaled.

    That's how we Poles and Czechs ate. In theory, such long-term eating habits should have killed me long ago. Today, my combined cholesterol is around 190. Admittedly, a lot of us knowing one another are dead and gone, as are many in other ethnic groups where I grew up.

    Back to Smiths ducks. They looked smallish, 'course, everything looking big to a kid diminishes in size apparently when he grows up. They ran in price range from $24 up to $30, EACH. I never opened the cabinet door to see price per lb., but called my wife over inquiringly. She said, "Ducks!" That was all. My look appealed. Not enough. "Too pricey".

    Have never tasted wild duck. Would in a heartbeat, given the chance. Shooting one would be very easy around here; they swim about in the Colorado River year-round, by the hundreds, if not thousands. But, could I bring myself to......nah, proly not. Frank
     
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  2. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    There is a Sunday market here where they sell wild ducks, quails, deer meat, wild boar meat, goat's meat and any other "strange" food. I had once mentioned the wild duck to my husband and he replied that the meat is tough, actually very tough compared to the chicken. His father used to be a hunter in the mountains and so many times they have tasted wild duck meat. A special marinade is used to tenderize the meat. From my husband's recollection, the marinade is pineapple juice and 7-up with crushed garlic and other seasoning. With the cooking, it is better baked (more likely it is grilled) so the distribution of heat is even on the inside and outside.

    Whew, this thread seems to be prodding me to try that wild duck next week.
     
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  3. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    @Frank Sanoica , Hungarians ate duck the same way but with potatoes roasted in the duck fat and red cabbage as a side.

    My husband loved it and I made it many times. He was a hunter and sometimes bought home a duck even though I said he wasn't allowed to bring home anything he killed.

    So being the wonderful wife I was , I made it. YUCk....gamey.

    We also had roast goose on rare occasions because that was more expensive than duck but I liked duck better.

    Ive seen Costco selling cooked Duck and all you have to do is heat it up and crisp the skin. Not outrageous in price but don't know for sure. My sister in NJ bought it while I was visiting once.
     
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  4. Ike Willis

    Ike Willis Very Well-Known Member
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    Meat was rationed during the war years (WW2). However, my family was fortunate in that my gramps raised chickens and rabbits in his back yard. He also had a large garden. So, the immediate family ate well. Several of mom's uncles had a fishing camp downriver about 12 or so miles. They shared fish, wild duck and goose with the family. So, for a few years during the war, Thanksgivings and Christmas featured a roast goose, or several ducks, veggies from gramps's garden and home baked pies with fruit also raised by gramps.
    My grandparents had a large old walnut tree in the back yard. There were other walnut trees nearby as well. We kids would help gather all the walnuts, which were then spread out on a shed roof to dry out before husking. I remember gramps battling the squirrels which were raiding the walnuts. Gramps had an old BB gun, and when he saw squirrels on or near his shed, he would grab that old Daisy BB gun and head out the door swearing a blue streak at those thieving @*%$&* squirrels.:)
     
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  5. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Very Well-Known Member
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    I had duck once in Las Vegas..........for me, never again! It was so, so oily. The only Game meat I've eaten is Elk and I bought that at Bass Pro. I think it was combined w/some beef and made into sticks. Had rattlesnake once. I was at a Chili Cook-off, went by one of the tables and was offered a taste. I thought I was eating nice, tender beef and told the maker that. He looked at me, smiled and took me around to see the rattlesnake hide laid out on a board. He said, "this is what you think is beef". I didn't "up-chuck" like I really thought I was going to and simply said "ok" with a smile. I digested it ok (thank God).

    For wife and I, we will just stick with normal beef and pork stuff.
     
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  6. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    As long as it's not gamey tasting, I'll eat it or at least try it. In Hungarian I ate some things that were good but they didn't tell me what I was eating til I finished. Which was smart because I wouldn't have tried it otherwise and missed out something that was quite delicious.
     
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  7. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    Dating my first wife-to-be, she was then only 17, I was 21, invited to their apartment on Christmas Eve, for dinner. They had several meat items, this was over 50 years ago, so only one thing stands out in my mind about the meal. They had a Polish tradition of having this delicacy only once a year, at Christmas. Later, I learned that all the Polish butcher shops sold it, only at that time of year! This must have been a National Polish Tradition, brought over from Europe.

    Sue's mother brought a platter of strange-looking black, skinny sausages to the table.

    Eels!
     
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  8. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Thank goodness Hungarians didn't do that....eels?? Doesn't Polish at all, lol.

    One gross thing Hungarians made were some dishes using pigs feet and tails and ears etc. as a child I thought It was disgusting but as an adult I loved it.

    One was a sort of aspic with the parts in it and another was a sort of goulash or stew with it and the sauce became sticky and gelatinous but was soooo good.

    Hope I'm not making anybody sick. :)
     
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  9. Texas Beth

    Texas Beth Well-Known Member
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    Of course, living in Texas it is beef, chicken and pork. However, a friend introduced me to duck. It was cooked the way it is in Viernam and boy was that good!!! I would eat duck several times a week if someone would teach how to prepare it.
     
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  10. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    image.jpg Here is a pic of the pigs feet and parts in aspic

    I made this many times for my husband....kids wouldn't touch it.
     
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  11. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    This is the closet pic I could find for the other way it was made.

    image.jpg
     
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  12. K E Gordon

    K E Gordon Very Well-Known Member
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    I made duck one time. I guess it was probably for Christmas or maybe for Easter. I am not really a fan of dark meat, although it was pretty good. I rember the duck came with an orange glaze, and that was quite tasty. I would make duck again. Maybe you could talk your wife into having the duck as a holiday meal.. @Frank Sanoica. Tell her you deserve it!:)
     
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  13. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Chrissy Page "Hope I'm not making anybody sick. :)

    GHOULASH? Not how you spelled it, but I would!
    Frank
     
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  14. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Texas Beth

    I imagine thaw it, throw it in the oven, maybe set for 350 degrees, have it in a deep enough pan to catch and contain the drippings, roast until skin golden brown. I think. But it won't be like Vietnamese.
    Frank
     
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  15. Marilyn Pahl

    Marilyn Pahl Well-Known Member
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    Was it Charnena (spelt wrong) Duck Blood Soup and sausages? There weren't all that many Russians in Toledo, but many Polish and Hungarian. Me and husband had many Polish friends that cooked and shared Polish foods.:)
     
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  16. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Marilyn Pahl

    I kind of thought my word looked strange, so no, it was not car-nina, but eel. Closest thing to blood soup where I grew up was a kind of blood sausage, called Jaternice, in Czech. That's pronounced "yi-thir-nyitz-eh". It was dark in color, containing cooked blood and a filler of rice. The "sister" sausage was white in color, called Jelita, "yel-ee-thah". No idea what was in it! :eek:
    Frank
     
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  17. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    image.jpg Hungarians had the blood sausage also. The white one was with liver like liver wurst I think. The dark one was blood and rice. I grew to like them as an adult but didn't as a child.

    It was called Hurka in Hungarian.
     
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  18. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Chrissy Page
    Your pics are almost exactly as I remember them. Only difference was they were not curved, but rather straight, and a bit skinnier. There was also a Czech sausage, very long, that they spiraled into a pinwheel, stuck 2 long wooden sticks through crosswise, to hold it together. Looked like this:

    [​IMG]
     
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  19. Ike Willis

    Ike Willis Very Well-Known Member
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    Two of my sons went through survival training while in the army. They told me about some of the things they ate. Large insects and snakes, almost anything that moved was on the menu.
    One son said they were left in the desert for a length of time. They had their rifles, but only blank cartridges. Son said he saw lots of those small wild desert pigs. So he loaded a blank cartridge in his rifle, put the cleaning rod in the barrel. When the pigs came to a small water hole, he shot the cleaning rod through one, like an arrow. The other men were doing the same thing.The day before they were picked up, he shot a small deer the same way. They didn't have to eat many bugs on that trip.
     
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  20. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Ike Willis

    Clever use of the cleaning rod! I would have done the same to eat pig in preference to bugs and such, but still would fear the possibility of a burst barrel.
    Frank
     
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  21. Ike Willis

    Ike Willis Very Well-Known Member
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    I imagine the cleaning rods were a loose enough fit that enough gas blew by to keep that from happening. Still, there's always that chance.
     
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  22. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Ike Willis
    My Dad told me, as a kid, when I was growing up around firearms, several things that he saw happen, when he was young, with guns. One was when his own Dad, my Grandpa, and him were out hunting rabbit for dinner, in Wisconsin. My Grandpa tripped and stabbed the muzzle of his shotgun into the snow, no earth, just snow. Thought nothing of it. Short time later they flushed out a big rabbit, he aimed and fired, and a tremendous blast blew the end of the barrel open, like a peeled banana.

    The other incident was told to my Dad at 16, also in WI, by his Mother's brother, his uncle, who lived with them. He was deaf in one ear, that caused by a burst shotgun barrel way back by the breech.

    Shotguns are in my book good firearms, with several valid uses. Knowing and understanding their foibles as well as their proper use is the same as with any other gun.
     
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  23. Marilyn Pahl

    Marilyn Pahl Well-Known Member
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    Once when hunting with my dad and cousins it was pheasant season. I had a double barrel shotgun Dad let me use, when I went to fire the one side was enough to shimmy the shell in the other chamber. Had a crossfire going and knocked me on my rear. Scared the heck out of me was really shaking. Wasn't long after I got my 4.10....:)
     
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    Last edited: Sep 9, 2016
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  24. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Ike Willis @Marilyn Pahl

    Real early on, my Dad warned me that the right (and only) way to fire a shotgun, is to hold the stock tightly back against your shoulder. Failure to do so will likely result in a blow to the shoulder causing pain and bruising.

    He also said that firing a shotgun while holding the stock against a tree will likely break the stock. Never tried it though, which is surprising knowing my personal "need to know"!

    Eventually, I progressed to shooting the 12 gauge underhand, at my side. This gosh-awful shocks the elbow! Small wonder my elbows today are inventoried among the "joints that hurt".
    Frank
     
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  25. Marilyn Pahl

    Marilyn Pahl Well-Known Member
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    This shotgun I used no one seemed to know where it came from. I hated the looks of it anyway. I had a 22 that my cousin was using that day. Dad was furious and gave the double barrel shotgun to a gunsmith in town. Told him what happen to me and he could have it for nothing if he wanted it. The 4.10 many consider a ladies rifle was my favorite. I loved it for hunting and trap & skeet shooting.:)
     
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    Last edited: Sep 9, 2016
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