Staying Safe In Retirement & Leisure

Discussion in 'Retirement & Leisure' started by Sandy Wood, Sep 17, 2016.

  1. Ina I. Wonder

    Ina I. Wonder Very Well-Known Member
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    Hi @Yvonne Smith. :) When we bought this place back in the late 80's, we were in the poor countryside. Now, I'm in prime real-estate. My property is worth more than five times what we paid for it. Who would have guessed.

    Since Michael died, I've had motion detectors, extra strong fencing, and an electric gate installed. In the last effort to steal my car, the thieves tore my gate totally off it's support column. In two years, my gate has been broken four times.

    But so far the only real deterrent has been Bobert moving in.
     
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  2. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Greeter
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    Not a good thing, for sure, and I know that we have talked about this problem before. I am glad that you have your grandson there to watch after you. Is there anyplace you can park the car where it is more out of sight maybe ? But then, they might think you are not home and try to get in the house; so that is not a good thing either.
    Do you suppose it could be friends/relatives of the people you had to evict from the rental property ? They would certainly know all about your house and what valuables you might have there.
    Maybe you can get an alert for the gate that goes right to the police like a home security alarm does ?
     
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  3. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    It doesn't add security, but you can keep people guessing by using something that will turn some of your lights on and off periodically. We have a few of them that I move around from time to time, so that it doesn't look too predictable. Since we're away a lot, up north in the summer or traveling, I have them set so that a few of out lights will be turned on and off every now and then, such as a bathroom light coming on three or four times during the night, or our living room and office light being on for a few hours at night. Ours are on a timer, but I think you can find ones that will turn them on randomly as well. In that way, people don't know when you're not home, and they won't know when you settled into bed for the night.
     
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  4. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    Third largest city? I would never have thunk it!
    Frank
     
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  5. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    @Ina I. Wonder - over here, we have a button that you can wear or have close by
    when you push that, it immediately gets a response and you can tell the operator help is needed
    The lights Ken mentioned are a good idea, a good shock tactic being all lit up :D
    Also, have you considered getting a 'bear' - can you imagine that ! What a deterrent that would be !
     
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  6. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Very Well-Known Member
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    Let me put this in this Thread:

    I talked to a Deputy last year who stopped by our apt concerning a car break-in of a neighbor of ours. Thing is, it wasn't a "break-in", because the lady admitted that she forgot to lock her vehicle and the vehicle has no alarm. This happened twice to her. The officer told me that it is call "a crime of convenience", being the car was not locked.

    Everyone can be a victim of crime, but, on the other side of that coin, sometimes crimes happen to our own neglect. Some folks, for whatever reasons, don't have a banking acct. and keep a rather large sum of money in their home. Somehow, someway, a person can find that out and break into the home. People "think" they are living in a descent area and leave their vehicles unlocked. If a person is living in a small town in Wyoming or Montana, that can possibly be done, but other places........nope. Sometimes, people need to look more at what they are not doing for protection. Watch what you tell people and, yes, watch what info you put online. We buy things online, so our info is out there in "cyberland", but that's just the way it is when order/buying something online.

    When we leave our apt. in the evening or on vacation, we always leave a light on and set the alarm inside. The alarm is no longer functional for contacting law enforcement, because the complex stopped paying for that a few years ago and, as we all know, not all Seniors/retirees can afford things they could afford when they were employed. However, after the alarm is set at the panel by the front door, if the front door, back door or any windows are opened, a whistling noise will go off from the panel. Also, when we leave, we lock both the regular lock and the deadbolt.
    Our vehicle has an alarm on it and we set it every time we get out and make sure it's set when we go to bed. There is a red blinking light on the dash that indicates an alarm is on. We are also getting a locking gas cap, just to make sure.
    As far as, inside our apt. goes, we do have a protection.

    Home and personal protection can cost and, unfortunately, like already stated here, not all Seniors/retirees can afford that cost.
     
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  7. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    I have ADT security and got them before I had Pickles who will bark if someone is even just walking by my house....he's good at alerting me but he doesn't call the police which my ADT does.

    I pay $60 a month and in the 10 years I've had them I've never had it go off because someone was breaking in and many times I've thought of getting rid of them but I sleep better at night because of them.

    My car is always in my garage so that's not worry.

    I also have what is called a panic button from ADT, if I press it police will come out....I have to look to see where I put it though because I only had it near me when I first got ADT.

    I think just having the sign out front and on my windows that I have ADT is a deterrent, sure robbers will choose an easier house.
     
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  8. Augusta Heathbourne

    Augusta Heathbourne Active Member
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    @Sandy Wood has not posted since November last year, if I am understanding this correctly, and that makes me wonder if something further happened to her? Does anyone know if she is OK? It was only a few weeks after her last break-in that she last posted... Seems odd that she would just go quiet for so long. I hope she is OK.
     
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  9. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Greeter
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    She is on another forum that I belong to, and she has been absent there for a while; but is now posting on that forum again; so maybe she will be back here again as well.
    I enjoy her posts, and was concerned about her, too.
     
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  10. Augusta Heathbourne

    Augusta Heathbourne Active Member
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    Thank you for letting me know! That is excellent news.
     
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  11. Gloria Mitchell

    Gloria Mitchell Very Well-Known Member
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    Wow, seems as though she has taken the right steps to protect herself some now.We live in a gated community apartment complex-so far no break ins around here-except on occasion a car or two. Even being gated does not make us entirely safe. Radar our dog, is small but misses nothing- fat chance of anyone coming in uninvited. Because of of disgust for door to door sales(not allowed here, but does happen sometimes) a brief note attached to my door keeps them away-um even the pizza guy before he got to know us:
    By Order of Smith and Wesson- NO SOLICITATION ! Works like a charm:D
     
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  12. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    For awhile, the "rage" was to place a warning poster in a window near the door, depicting a handgun pointed at the viewer, with words like, "Protected by Smith & Wesson".

    The irony is, bragging about having a firearm is like inviting the seasoned burglar, who knowingly breaks in when the place is unoccupied, to choose the place with such a notice: a gun is the first item he's after.
    Frank
     
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  13. Augusta Heathbourne

    Augusta Heathbourne Active Member
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    Long ago, when I lived in a scary part of California, I placed a target from my recent shooting practice, showing holes all around and through the bull's eye, in my front door window. Same idea, and that is what I had, a Smith & Wesson. One of the best things about living in Australia, though, is walking around knowing that (almost) no one is armed; a nice feeling, lets one breathe a bit easier. But it is a very different culture here. All my American rellies grew up with guns and have cabinets full of them.
     
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  14. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    Perhaps I'm naive, but I have rarely felt in danger, There were times when I was a kid hitchhiking around the country when I recognized possible dangers, but I have rarely felt in fear of being harmed in any place that I have lived, and I spent more than twenty years on the Texas-Mexican border, and twelve years before that in Buena Park, Cypress, Garden Grove, Long Beach, and Anaheim, California. In California, I generally locked my doors, and I lock our doors before I go to bed here, but they are left unlocked while we are awake. Often, I hear people talking about security and keeping safe, but I don't feel unsafe.

    I own a handgun and a shotgun, but that's mostly because, under Obama, it was beginning to look like our options for buying a weapon might close at any time. They're not loaded, and by the time i found the ammunition and loaded the guns, I don't expect they'd do me any good here, but neither do I expect to need them.
     
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  15. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    Perhaps because I am a Christian and truly believe that God is my protector and hedge of protection wherever I am that knowing this has helped me have a sense of peace and safety wherever I have lived, etc. There have been a few times when I have felt God's Spirit giving me wisdom and discernment that places, etc. weren't safe for me too...and I have always listened when given that wisdom and discernment.
     
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  16. Janice Martin

    Janice Martin Well-Known Member
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    I started posting on a similar topic months ago, but misplaced the thread. Everyone has their own situation, perspective, etc., but for me it is not about safety per se but rather a person's right (or lack thereof) to defend oneself. THE problem- which everyone around (citizens AND criminals) believe, is unless you believe your life is in danger you HAVE no rights. In other words, you cannot ever put your hands on another person or you risk getting arrested for assault, regardless of the situation. Citizens are victimized, or feel like 'sitting ducks,' and criminals get away with whatever they want.
     
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  17. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Janice Martin ".....Citizens are victimized, or feel like 'sitting ducks,' and criminals get away with whatever they want."

    Of course! Thank you "Political Correctness"!
    Frank
     
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  18. Neville Telen

    Neville Telen Active Member
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    Its not enough to just have a gun. You have to know how to maintain it, be able to shoot it accurately, and most important of all, be ready, willing and able to use it. Hollyweird has too many movies of cowering gals holding a gun, the invader kicks in her door, she points the gun as he walks towards her, she freezes up, he takes the gun and shoots her with it. Apparently the moral of the story is not to have a gun, but the real moral is be prepared to shoot to kill (or don't have a gun).
     
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  19. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Neville Telen
    In your one post, you have basically covered the tenets of armed self defense. They are: Understand and appreciate the advantage provided by possessing a firerarm, but predicate that on total firearm familiarity and comfort. Those who like, admire, use, and collect firearms, are the far more likely to emerge from an armed encounter safe and alive.
    Frank
     
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  20. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    'Hollyweird' that's my name for it these days :p
     
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  21. Neville Telen

    Neville Telen Active Member
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    I agree. Too many examples have arisen over the years of a gun-wielding crazy, fanatic, etc., going into a building and taking out crowds of unarmed people. I vaguely recall one example back East of a killer shooting people on a train, going from car to car, and the survivors had to wait for him to reload to subdue him. Never did find out what happened to the killer, but I bet not much! The lives of victims are cheap in our legal system....cheaper by the dozen?
     
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  22. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Neville Telen
    I once saw a quick video made by a passenger in a subway car seated at one end, looking towards the far end. A thug suddenly arose midway in the car, back to the video maker, and began making demands at gunpoint. At least a dozen able-bodied men seated and standing behind the robber remain glued in place. Several could very easily have throttled this bastard from behind, but as is usual in New York City, none moved.
    Frank
     
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  23. Neville Telen

    Neville Telen Active Member
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    I would much doubt the social disease of apathy is confined to NYC, more likely prevalent in all areas of this country, especially major cities. About eight years ago I was on a Muni bus in Frisco when a thug boarded, refused to pay the fare, and when the driver ordered the subhumanoid off the bus, it started punching the driver. No one moved until I started heading towards him, then some fat guy got out of his seat, and blocked my path until the creature had finished with the driver, and left....then 'tubolard' sat back down like nothing happened. So not only did no one on the bus try to aid the driver, one fine citizen intentionally blocked me from intervening. Never expect help from anyone at any time. Always assume that if trouble comes your way, you are the only one to depend on.
     
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  24. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Veteran Member
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    @Frank Sanoica and @Neville Telen , I like your posts and agree.

    One thing I've seen recently about deterring thieves is to keep your car keys next to your bed. If you suspect a prowler press the alarm button so the car will honk and flash it's lights. This will send most of the bad guys running.
     
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  25. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Sheldon Scott
    But consider if the intruder is in your home, he is bound to be highly nervous, "twitchy" in maybe more ways than one, and if he's carrying a gun......his finger will be on the trigger, not next to it. So, the circumstances of course dictate plans of action. If the guy is jimmying your sliding glass door from the outside, by all means get the car alarm going.

    The self-defense culture varies by geographical location, of course. While we lived in Phoenix years ago, a man was awakened by an intruder doing just that: trying to force open the glass door with a crowbar, seen clearly by the homeowner when he clicked on the outdoor light, which did nothing to sway the intruder's efforts. Armed with his pistol, the homeowner, family cowering in their bedroom, fired one shot through the glass door, killing the intruder. He was not charged with any crime.
    Frank
     
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