Problems Finding Work

Discussion in 'Senior Employment' started by Hannah Davis, Apr 17, 2015.

  1. Hannah Davis

    Hannah Davis Active Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 16, 2015
    Messages:
    514
    Likes Received:
    243
    It seems when the bottom fell out of the economy here in the United States it also fell out of my employment options. Prior to that I was earning a living working as a Temporay worker. I had quite a few jobs coming my way and I was still out there looking for permanent employment as well, but nothing seem to be happening on that front. So, I continued working as a temporary worker doing various jobs for various companies, then came financial crisis and the jobs weren't there any longer.

    That's not to say I wasn't trying I still contacted my agencies every day, and I was still looking for work. Some told me that my age I was in my early to mid forties then was part of the problem. I didn't understant why because you would think with age would come experience along with reliability. But now years later I am working online because well if no one would hire me I had to do it myself, I have had some decent jobs and some not so decent out here. I have also had my ups and downs where I have made good money then none at all.

    I didn't know if it was me who just had this problem, but then I started hearing about others on the news in the later forties and fities having the same issue. I also now know someone with a whole lot of vialbe work experience who can't seem to find work now that they are in their mid fifties.

    I don't know if this has to do with our age and the fact that companies see someone as being close to reitirement age so why invest in them. I don't know if it has to do with the fact that someone in a higher position could feel threatened by an older person with expericence because they could take their job or if it has to do with the fact that companies feel if they go with a younger not so experienced person they won't have to pay them as much. Not sure which of these is the reason perhaps its a mixture of all three.
     
    #1
  2. Ruth Belena

    Ruth Belena Active Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2015
    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    166
    One thing I have noticed is that recruitment ads and Work For Us pages always show images of young attractive people. They never show pictures of anyone over the age of 30.

    I think most of the people working in recruitment and PR are young themselves and they might think that an older person will not fit in with younger co-workers or with the company image.

    Now that people are living longer, most of us stay healthy and fit long after the age of 40. The fact is that older employees are generally more reliable and usually take less time off work than young employees who regularly go out partying and stay up late at night.
     
    #2
    Richard Paradon likes this.
  3. Von Jones

    Von Jones Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2015
    Messages:
    3,174
    Likes Received:
    1,746
    Hannah, I know exactly what you're talking about. Even though there is not suppose to be discrimination against age it still exists. The younger generation to me now holds upper management positions. Which is all well and good but their perceptions are focused on technology and its advancements in the workplace not years of experience the seniors have.

    Companies also look at cost of healthcare for seniors too. It would costs less for employees that are younger and healthier.

    Seniors that are close to retirement raise eyebrows with questions already answered how long if hired are they going to stay? 5, 10 years at the most.

    But seniors do still have options open to them which I myself have been considering. Self employment is one, others are to switch career interests or go back to school, seek out jobs that train.

    It may take time and that's one thing that we've got.
     
    #3
  4. Molly Fenster

    Molly Fenster New Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2015
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    14
    I if someone know the struggle of looking for a job in the older age; All the employers seem to be looking for younger blood and they do not appreciate elders at all. I think that is really discriminating but they do have a point. Still, finding a part-time job was a pain for me.
     
    #4
  5. Brittany Houser

    Brittany Houser Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2015
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    536
    Molly I think it's very discriminatory too. Where I work, there are some of us who are older, and some who are in their early twenties. Honestly we older people work circles around the young ones. They complain all the time about having to work, and when management isn't around, they're texting. Their breaks stretch far longer than the 15 minutes they're supposed to have, and they just don't seem to think they should have to work. But when promotion time comes, they never even consider anyone over 30!
     
    #5
    Richard Paradon likes this.
  6. Jenn Windey

    Jenn Windey Active Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2015
    Messages:
    341
    Likes Received:
    246
    I have always felt that people our age are the lost generation. I was just saying this to my son today, those of us at the end of the boomers got the short straw, we never really were in the position to get the great stable jobs because there were so many ahead of us in the job market already. So we settled and played the game putting in our time, and I don't know what happened but here I am at 52 with nothing to show for the efforts. I watched my whole life, and bought the line that if you just work hard enough, through the natural process you would end up in the place those people ten years older were in, that is a place in the workforce with a pension, vacations to where ever, a modest home and a corvette. It just never happened like that for me. Luckily I was born poor so it was no shock remaining poor.

    I have seen two things in the job market, the first thing is there are many people still in jobs that they should have retired from already. In my past two positions there were people over the age of 70 that just did not want to retire. The one woman would make me so angry, she was not poor and yet she worked at salary, taking ample time off and basically getting everyone else to do the real work. I would be angry because here was me trying so hard just to keep the lights on and I felt that this old bat was just being greedy. Sort of the same thing at my current job, this woman is 74 takes entire months off and only works about 15-17 hours a week, yet she pulls quite a salary. I on the other hand work close to 60 hours a week and make half that pay. I also have not had a vacation since 2007. I try not to have sour grapes, but this woman is collecting social security, has medicare and a husband with a pension and retirement. I get to pay my own health care because I am to young for medicare and struggle just to keep the lights on. Is it her fault I never remarried or did not do better in my life? I don't think it is, but at the same token i do not like hearing about her month of drinking in Aruba, or about how she has to get a limo so they can go out on the town.

    I just feel like had this been the 1970's these folks would have been long retired. As long as there are older people in the workforce that don't really need it, jobs for those that do need it are blocked. I have contemplated taking a night shift job at the grocery store stocking shelves or something (mind you I work a professional position now) I feel that if I have to do that, there is some younger person maybe with little kids that will not have a job. It does flow right down the line. It is a sad state, and I know when I do get to retire I will only have social security, there is no pension for me. At the best I will not have to pay for my own medical insurance anymore. I guess it is just the luck of the draw, and I got the short straw this life.
     
    #6
  7. Brittany Houser

    Brittany Houser Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2015
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    536
    I don't think it's sour grapes and what if it is? You're making some really good points here. I work with a person just like the ones you mentioned. She pretty much sets her own schedule, and doesn't accomplish much at all when she's on the job. I wonder why they don't just retire and let someone else move up the ladder, or at least give the company a chance to hire people who will actually work!
     
    #7
    Holly Saunders likes this.
  8. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2,336
    Likes Received:
    3,478
    Quoting Jenn Windey "As long as there are older people in the workforce that don't really need it, jobs for those that do need it are blocked"

    And the government keeps raising the retirement age and at the same time complaining about the lack of jobs.

    It would make more sense to lower the retirement age and make more jobs available for young people.
     
    #8
  9. Richard Paradon

    Richard Paradon Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2015
    Messages:
    722
    Likes Received:
    359
     
    #9
  10. Richard Paradon

    Richard Paradon Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2015
    Messages:
    722
    Likes Received:
    359
    When I was young I thought that nobody would ever retire and I could get a better position. When I use to be in management it was always a difficult decision choosing young and willing to learn and older with experience. Sometimes it was their personality in the second interview that war the decision maker.
     
    #10
  11. Lynne Prestwood

    Lynne Prestwood New Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2
    Here is my dilemma. I worked as a Secretary back in the 80's then I quit to raise my kids then their father passed away forcing me back into the work force accept it was now in the late 90's and everything has changed so I had to take a housekeeping position for a bit until I met my second husband so I did not work for about 5 years but I did go to college and earned a Bachelors Degree in Animation/Graphic Design but I could not find a job in the field because they want experienced people so I went back to housekeeping at Nordstrom's which paid pretty good but then I separated from my husband and ended up quitting because it was too far. Now I work at Ross in the stock room part time only 2 to 3 days a week so I am still looking for full time work. I had applied at a warehouse and they called me for their art department as a layout artist, but I was not selected. So I have experience in the office field but it is hard to get in because my office experience was from the past and they want someone who is currently working in the field and now a days I heard that companies use this software that they put your resume into and it shows where your experience is and mine always comes up in retail because I have worked at stores mostly. So, it is quite difficult these days to get into a company that you can establish yourself in and retire at.
     
    #11
    Joe Riley likes this.
  12. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    7,450
    Likes Received:
    9,810
    I'm exhausted.
     
    #12
    Brittany Houser likes this.
  13. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2015
    Messages:
    3,117
    Likes Received:
    2,554
    From age 25 up to 51, I really didn't have a problem getting a job. I was living most of that time in So California/Orange County where there were plenty of warehouse, shipping/receiving and stockroom type jobs. For a lot of those years I was single and the highest salary I made was $11 per hour, but back then that wasn't bad. Things were cheaper. I rented a furnished room in a house, drove an older truck and done a lot of my own cooking. I didn't have a college degree, so I had to depend on past experience when looking for a new job. I did go to college, but it didn't last a year. Heck, I had a hard enough time just graduating from high school! Of course, as I grew older, I found out just how much a college degree would have helped me get a job. By the time I took some online classes, I was older and it just wasn't noticed on my resume. I did have one good (very good) thing going for me, when I was introduced into using a computer on the job in 1988, I really liked it!

    Shoot, on my last job, starting when I was 51, I had my own office/desk/computer/phone and absolutely love it. I already knew enough about Purchasing and Inventory to work in that area as a Materials Coordinator. I was making $13.50 per hour and I felt like I was making $50k a year! I was married again by this time.

    I truly understand the frustration of "age discrimination", but if you owned a company, who would you employ........a younger person full of energy or someone our age who would be much more of a health risk and possibly slower at learning new things and doing the job? I think businesses have to worry more about how older people/Seniors are on the job than if "so and so" is texting someone, on their computer ordering Christmas gifts or whatever. Us Seniors might be more reliable, but we sure aren't faster!
     
    #13
    Lynne Prestwood likes this.
  14. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2015
    Messages:
    3,117
    Likes Received:
    2,554
    Well, I hate to say this, but (in black above), this was ME at age 51 until I left (quit) the last company I worked for at 55. My wife was the real "strict" one at work. If a phone call had to be made during a work day, I'd have to make it from my job. Unless absolutely necessary, she made no personal calls from work. There were times in the morning, and it wasn't even "break time" that my 47 yr. old Director/Supervisor and I would check out the latest sports scores on ESPN on our computers. Taking a longer break than 15 minutes, oh for sure! Sometimes I drive down to the local McDonald's and get breakfast for him and I and sometimes the Transportation Supervisor. We got our work done, but it was a very laid-back office area and we liked it that way!
     
    #14
  15. Brittany Houser

    Brittany Houser Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2015
    Messages:
    680
    Likes Received:
    536
    I understand what you're saying. I think it depends entirely on the type of work you're involved in. In my business, we have a timeline for getting everything done in a days time. If we don't accomplish the day's goals, we are in danger of a write-up. What I see on a daily basis is most of the younger people slacking off, because they know that the rest of us will pick up their slack.
     
    #15
    Diane Lane likes this.
  16. Lynne Prestwood

    Lynne Prestwood New Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    2
    I hear ya on that one about being slower. At the job I have now in the stock room, they expect us to deliver the merchandise out onto the sales floor in 15 min! and it is impossible because we have these stack able bins of 5 and we have to attach a security tag to each item and place a sticker seal on the packages. So many times they came looking for me to see why it is taking so long, I have been written up about 4 or 5 times in the past year and a half. Everything has to be done fast! I wish I can get into an office job, I am just too old for this kind of work.
     
    #16
    Diane Lane likes this.
  17. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2015
    Messages:
    2,906
    Likes Received:
    2,419
    Finding work here is more difficult. Although the US economy is not that good but I guess it is far easier to find a job there particularly for the middle aged and seniors. Job seekers at age 40 would most likely apply for working abroad because his chances of finding a job here is almost nil. Although companies would say they don't discriminate applicants, it is an unwritten rule that age matters in HR departments.

    When my husband resigned from his last permanent job, he was past 40 so we had accepted that the situation. It was just fortunate that he was hired as a technical consultant by a small non-profit organization. But I know of so many middle aged who are jobless. What more with senior citizens?
     
    #17
    Diane Lane likes this.
  18. Ruth Belena

    Ruth Belena Active Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2015
    Messages:
    290
    Likes Received:
    166
    When I worked with younger people at the age of 50 and again in voluntary work when I was approaching 60, I had far more stamina than most of them. They were the ones taking time off for health reasons and kept turning up bleary-eyed in the mornings when I was full of energy and rarely had a day off for illness.

    As for learning new things - I graduated with a BA degree after the age of 50. At the age of 18 -21 I was not capable of achieving that level of understanding.

    Unfortunately this false concept about older people is what is preventing employers from understanding that someone our age can be mentally and physically more capable than someone half our age. Many of us can and do work faster and can contribute more because of our previous work experience.
     
    #18
    Diane Lane and Holly Saunders like this.
  19. Pat Baker

    Pat Baker Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2015
    Messages:
    877
    Likes Received:
    459
    I agree that this is a false concept and the wording "senior citizen" is old and not speaking to the current group of people that have passed their 50th birthday. I worked part time in a restaurant as a server another older woman and I would work circles around the much younger staff and make more money than they did. Most of the younger people would not work with us saying we worked them to hard.

    Because of the difficulty of find outside employment as I aged I have been more inclined to be self employed one way or another.
     
    #19
    Von Jones and Diane Lane like this.
  20. Krissttina Isobe

    Krissttina Isobe Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2015
    Messages:
    1,401
    Likes Received:
    1,450
    Seems that everywhere is having the same problems of employment. Locally on Oahu back in 2009 when Target was opening up there were 5,000 people applying for 500 jobs. Companies closing up or retiring is also a bad sign. J. C. Penney's has only one store opened on the Windward side and Sears followed them. These are big stores that always do well, until recently. Times are changing and are bad for employment. People are still looking just can't find jobs. Welfare laws changed and many became or becoming homeless. Now the people elected are trying to make laws to stop homelessness by being cruel. The homeless are fighting back with a law suit against the City.
    http://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2015/sep/16/aclu-planning-to-sue-honolulu-over-homeless-camp-s/
    It seems that cruelty doesn't work. The homeless don't have transportation to get to shelters. The City does this sweep to clean up and the homeless come back again over and over again. The City throws away peoples belongings when they do their sweeps. It's a sad situation locally. It's so sad when you think that you try so hard looking for a job and did not find one and it's not your fault. I hope things change and jobs become abundant again. Good luck!!!
     
    #20
    Diane Lane and Holly Saunders like this.
  21. Arlene Richards

    Arlene Richards Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2015
    Messages:
    2,002
    Likes Received:
    530
    I’m no longer in the job market, thank goodness. But I just wanted to add some comments, FWIW.

    I've participated in several job hunting forums where a lot of people talked about their frustrations. While I know age discrimination exists, there are SO many other factors. One thing is that it’s become a numbers game – over the past ….oh, I’d say 10 yrs or so things have tightened up drastically. Lots of companies going out of business, many existing companies and organizations rethinking their staffing decisions. Often when someone retires, moves, resigns, or even dies, an employer won’t replace the person. Instead they’ll combine their duties with another job and/or make others pitch in. Whether it be private sector, non-profit, or government things aren’t the way they used to be and never will be the same. The "good ole days" are gone.

    I’ve heard countless stories – on and offline – of people sending hundreds of resumes and filling out applications until their hands cramp. Then they wait and wait and get maybe 1 or 2 interviews over the course of several months.
    In addition to applying for posted/advertised jobs, I think networking is crucial. Somebody might know or be related to someone who knows of an upcoming job vacancy. I also advise people to make a list of 10 places they think they might want to work. (small or mid size) Do some homework. If they have a website study it. Find out the name(s) of hiring authorities (as opposed to just “HR” where you will be one on a pile of several dozen or more). Send an email and ask for a 10 minute “information interview” – no strings. Send a follow up thanking them for their time and reiterating your interest, and make sure to let them know why you would be an asset. Then make a list of 10 more - lather, rinse, repeat.
     
    #21
  22. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2015
    Messages:
    2,906
    Likes Received:
    2,419
    Speaking of jobless, my husband meets a lot of unemployed in the movie industry. Some are directors, assistant directors, cinematographers and other workers in movie production. When the digital technology arrived and the digital piracy started destroying the integrity of music an movies by copying, the movie producers became scarce. With the less movies, the workers lost their livelihood. And to think that they are not regular workers so they have no social security to speak of. It's pathetic that some of those aged movie industry workers would be visiting the office of my husband in the hope of being handed lunch money.
     
    #22
  23. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2015
    Messages:
    4,590
    Likes Received:
    4,020
    @Lynne Prestwood Hi Lynne, welcome to the forum.

    I have friends in their 50s who have had difficulty finding jobs. One I worked with for years up in New England. She doesn't move as fast as some, because she grew up on 'island time' in the Carribbean, and moves at a slower pace than many, but she is a good person, intelligent, and dedicated. She doesn't have a college degree, and I've seen her struggling from one job to another since her job where we worked ended. Most of the ones she's been able to get involve physical labor, and like Lynne, she isn't up to it. I think the last time I saw a flush economy with everyone I knew who wanted a decent job to have one was back in the 1980s. Ever since then, many have been struggling. Even when they could get jobs, the jobs weren't the same sort they would have had prior to the 1990s. Another former co-worker (from that same job) is working part time for UPS, I believe. He's college educated, and attended a good school, but is unable to find a full time job. He's fortunate to have a mom with 2 homes who lets him live in one, because much of his income supports his child from a previous marriage. I have another friend who works in retail and struggles on minimum wage. She juggles grandparent duties while taking care of an ill/injured parent and spouse. I just don't see the economy improving, and it's scary to see good people who are hard workers, struggling just to get along on a daily basis. This is definitely not the same economy my parents raised us in.
     
    #23
    Arlene Richards and Von Jones like this.
  24. Arlene Richards

    Arlene Richards Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2015
    Messages:
    2,002
    Likes Received:
    530
    @ Diane Lane - very interesting post. I was nodding my head while reading.
     
    #24
  25. Sandy Wood

    Sandy Wood Active Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 17, 2016
    Messages:
    134
    Likes Received:
    172
    For me what I find hardest about finding a job is that all the jobs I am interested in doing now require a collage degree. When I was young and filled with energy I worked long hours standing on my feet or moving at a fast pace to get things done. But now I am much older and on disability, and find the jobs available are not suited to my abilities. I can not stand for long periods of time nor can I do math as well as I used too, or handle crowds of people. So my choices are limited. I am not into calling people on the telephone as in sales or marketing, or being a cashier or bag stuffer at the market. I had hoped to find a few online jobs but most of them do not supply enough money to pay bills every month. So I understand the worries and concerns of other job seekers, as well as the ones that hold on to jobs just so they can afford to pay their bills. It is harder for us older folks to get and keep jobs with so many people who are unemployed looking for work.
     
    #25
    Sheldon Scott likes this.

Share This Page