Photos From The Hubble Space Satelite

Discussion in 'Science & Nature' started by Babs Hunt, Apr 22, 2016.

  1. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    The Hubble Space Satelite has got to be one of the best "digital cameras" in the Universe in my opinion. And of course since I am so drawn to God...the picture of the "Eye of God" Helix Nebula would draw me like a beacon.

    There are many beautiful Hubble photographs of our Universe and I hope that y'all will share some of your favorites here too. And I hope I put this tread in the right area.

    Eye-of-God-Helix-Nebula-NGC-7293.jpg

    Eye-of-God Helix Nebula

    10 Fascinating Facts About the Hubble Space Telescope

    I wanted to add this link here as these really are 10 Fascination Facts About the Hubble Space Telescope. :) Check the link out and let me know how many of these facts you did know. I didn't know any of them. Now I do.

    Here's Fact #3 that most of us didn't know....

    3. The launch was delayed by the Challenger disaster.

    The fledgling Hubble program suffered a massive blow in 1986, after the space shuttle Challenger exploded during liftoff, killing seven astronauts. NASA grounded its space fleet in the wake of the tragedy, leaving Hubble—which depended on the shuttle for its transport and maintenance—without a ride into orbit. Scientists made good use of the delay by upgrading the sensitivity of the telescope’s instruments and refining its ground control software, but the added years of servicing and storage in a high tech clean room sent costs soaring. By the time the space shuttle Discovery finally lifted off in 1990 with Hubble tucked into its cargo bay, the project was seven years behind schedule and more than $1 billion over budget.
     
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    Last edited: Apr 23, 2016
  2. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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  3. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
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    This is so interesting,@Babs Hunt . I watch all I can about our universe.
     
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  4. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    Oh NASA....you done it again!;)
    [​IMG]
     
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  5. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    This photo is referred to often as angel wings.
    hs-2011-38-a-web_print.jpg
     
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  6. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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  7. Denise Happyfeet

    Denise Happyfeet Very Well-Known Member
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    I look at Hubble often Babs. The last thing I read, and saw pictures on, was just beyond description. The Universe seems endless, and finding out that many of the stars I see at night are actually galaxies like our, The Milky Way, just blew my mind.

    I don't know much about this pastor, but this was one of the best sermons I ever heard. If you don't want to watch it, at least check out something in the video called Laminin, a protein molecule in our bodies. It starts after 28:00 on the video. A molecular biologist came up to the pastor.
     
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  8. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    I shared that same video on the Faith and Religion Forum in a tread....although mine is a shorter version of the video. It's a wonderful video and worth listening to and seeing for sure! :)
     
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  9. Denise Happyfeet

    Denise Happyfeet Very Well-Known Member
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    Glad you agree @Babs Hunt Sometimes I will miss things in a sermon that are "off", and I was hoping some folks would see what I saw in it, mostly heard:) I know a lot of opinions are, like the snopes site, are poopooing it, although, they also had some supporting things to say about it:) Thanks again, denise
     
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  10. Denise Happyfeet

    Denise Happyfeet Very Well-Known Member
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    Yes, amazing the human brain, and what wonderful "good" things it can bring about;)
     
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  11. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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  12. Denise Happyfeet

    Denise Happyfeet Very Well-Known Member
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    I used to ask myself if the galaxies, stars, planets would really look as they do in the Hubble shots. I found my answer here, and it is so interesting to me to learn and understand;)

    http://hubblesite.org/gallery/behind_the_pictures/

    be sure and take a peek at the vid;) denise PS the vid has a place to click in bottom right to go fullscreen, much easier to view;)
     
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  13. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    Starry stary night, Mosaic
    [​IMG]
     
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  14. Krissttina Isobe

    Krissttina Isobe Very Well-Known Member
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    The universe is ever so beautiful with the infancy of different galaxies as seen in your pictures.

    [​IMG]
    image is from https://www.spacetelescope.org/images/opo9607a/ and is called the Hourglass Nebula or MyCn18.
    Magnificent is nature's artistry. This Hourglass Nebula is located 8,000 light years away from us.
     
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  15. K E Gordon

    K E Gordon Very Well-Known Member
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    Wow, those are some magnificent pictures. It is just one of the ways that people can explore the galaxies without really being there. Thanks for sharing, as the possibility of seeing galaxies for ourselves is pretty remote. It is just one of the ways we can keep in touch with what is out there in the world. Thanks for posting!!
     
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  16. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    The Cat's Eye Nebula, one of the first planetary nebulae discovered, also has one of the most complex forms known to this kind of nebula. Eleven rings, or shells, of gas make up the Cat's Eye.
    hs-2004-27-a-web_print.jpg
     
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  17. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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  18. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    Hubble sorta takes Cloud Watching to another level!;)
    [​IMG]
     
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  19. Gary Ridenour

    Gary Ridenour Very Well-Known Member
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    the blue marble

    [​IMG]
     
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  20. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    Hubble's Pluto Discoveries
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    216JlAly7gL.jpg [​IMG] breakfast-specials-sign-4006-a.jpg
     
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  21. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    hs-2013-17-a-large_web.jpg
    ABOUT THIS IMAGE:
    The Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) is one of the Milky Way's closest galactic neighbors. Even though it is a small or so-called dwarf galaxy, the SMC is so bright that it is visible to the unaided eye from the Southern Hemisphere and near the equator. Many navigators, including Ferdinand Magellan who lends his name to the SMC, used it to help find their way across the oceans.

    Modern astronomers are also interested in studying the SMC (and its cousin, the Large Magellanic Cloud), but for very different reasons. Because the SMC is so close and bright, it offers an opportunity to study phenomena that are difficult to examine in more distant galaxies.

    New Chandra data of the SMC have provided one such discovery: the first detection of X-ray emission from young stars, with masses similar to our Sun, outside our Milky Way galaxy. The new Chandra observations of these low-mass stars were made of the region known as the "Wing" of the SMC. In this composite image of the Wing, the Chandra data are shown in purple, optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope are shown in red, green, and blue, and infrared data from the Spitzer Space Telescope are shown in red.

    Astronomers call all elements heavier than hydrogen and helium — that is, with more than two protons in the atom's nucleus — "metals." The Wing is a region known to have fewer metals compared to most areas within the Milky Way. There are also relatively lower amounts of gas, dust, and stars in the Wing compared to the Milky Way.

    Taken together, these properties make the Wing an excellent location to study the life cycle of stars and the gas lying in between them. Not only are these conditions typical for dwarf irregular galaxies like the SMC, they also mimic ones that would have existed in the early universe.

    Most star formation near the tip of the Wing is occurring in a small region known as NGC 602, which contains a collection of at least three star clusters. One of them, NGC 602a, is similar in age, mass, and size to the famous Orion Nebula Cluster. Researchers have studied NGC 602a to see if young stars — that is, those only a few million years old — have different properties when they have low levels of metals, like the ones found in NGC 602a.

    Using Chandra, astronomers saw extended X-ray emission, from the two most densely populated regions in NGC 602a. The extended X-ray cloud likely comes from the population of young, low-mass stars in the cluster, which have previously been picked out by infrared and optical surveys using Spitzer and Hubble, respectively. This emission is not likely to be hot gas blown away by massive stars, because the low metal content of stars in NGC 602a implies that these stars should have weak winds. The failure to detect X-ray emission from the most massive star in NGC 602a supports this conclusion, because X-ray emission is an indicator of the strength of winds from massive stars. No individual low-mass stars are detected, but the overlapping emission from several thousand stars is bright enough to be observed.

    The Chandra results imply that the young, metal-poor stars in NGC 602 produce X-rays in a matter similar to stars with much higher metal content found in the Orion cluster in our galaxy. The authors speculate that if the X-ray properties of young stars are similar in different environments, then other related properties — including the formation and evolution of disks where planets form — are also likely to be similar.

    X-ray emission traces the magnetic activity of young stars and is related to how efficiently their magnetic dynamo operates. Magnetic dynamos generate magnetic fields in stars through a process involving the star's rotation speed and convection, the rising and falling of hot gas in the star's interior.

    The combined X-ray, optical, and infrared data also revealed, for the first time outside our galaxy, objects representative of an even younger stage of evolution of a star. These so-called "young stellar objects" have ages of a few thousand years and are still embedded in the pillar of dust and gas from which stars form, as in the famous "Pillars of Creation" of the Eagle Nebula.

    A paper describing these results was published online and in the March 1, 2013, issue of The Astrophysical Journal. The first author is Lidia Oskinova from the University of Potsdam in Germany.

    Object Names: NGC 602, N90
     
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  22. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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  23. Chris Ladewig

    Chris Ladewig Well-Known Member
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    Fantastic pictures.
     
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  24. Texas Beth

    Texas Beth Well-Known Member
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    The pictures from the Hubble are gorgeous. I had not seen these before. I understand, because of what they have seen in the heavens, many Cosmologists are Christian. I can see why.
     
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  25. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    hs-2015-42-a-web_print.jpg
    ABOUT THIS IMAGE:
    Just in time for the release of the movie "Star Wars Episode VII: The Force Awakens," NASA's Hubble Space Telescope has photographed what looks like a cosmic, double-bladed lightsaber.

    In the center of the image, partially obscured by a dark, Jedi-like cloak of dust, a newborn star shoots twin jets out into space as a sort of birth announcement to the universe.

    "Science fiction has been an inspiration to generations of scientists and engineers, and the film series Star Wars is no exception," said John Grunsfeld, astronaut and associate administrator for NASA's Science Mission Directorate. “There is no stronger case for the motivational power of real science than the discoveries that come from the Hubble Space Telescope as it unravels the mysteries of the universe."

    This celestial lightsaber does not lie in a galaxy far, far away, but rather inside our home galaxy, the Milky Way. It's inside a turbulent birthing ground for new stars known as the Orion B molecular cloud complex, located 1,350 light-years away.

    When stars form within giant clouds of cool molecular hydrogen, some of the surrounding material collapses under gravity to form a rotating, flattened disk encircling the newborn star.

    Though planets will later congeal in the disk, at this early stage the protostar is feeding on the disk with a Jabba-like appetite. Gas from the disk rains down onto the protostar and engorges it. Superheated material spills away and is shot outward from the star in opposite directions along an uncluttered escape route — the star's rotation axis.

    Shock fronts develop along the jets and heat the surrounding gas to thousands of degrees Fahrenheit. The jets collide with the surrounding gas and dust and clear vast spaces, like a stream of water plowing into a hill of sand. The shock fronts form tangled, knotted clumps of nebulosity and are collectively known as Herbig-Haro (HH) objects. The prominent HH object shown in this image is HH 24.

    Just to the right of the cloaked star, a couple of bright points are young stars peeking through and showing off their own faint lightsabers — including one that has bored a tunnel through the cloud towards the upper-right side of the picture.

    Overall, just a handful of HH jets have been spotted in this region in visible light, and about the same number in the infrared. Hubble's observations for this image were performed in infrared light, which enabled the telescope to peer through the gas and dust cocooning the newly forming stars and capture a clear view of the HH objects.

    These young stellar jets are ideal targets for NASA's upcoming James Webb Space Telescope, which will have even greater infrared wavelength vision to see deeper into the dust surrounding newly forming stars.



    For additional information, contact:

    Ray Villard
    Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland
     
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