New Project Hydroponics

Discussion in 'Crops & Gardens' started by Martin Alonzo, Sep 30, 2015.

  1. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    I received the 20% off sale, too; but I am not getting anything else either. I think that the squash seeds were not any good because they have not germinated, and the watermelons are already starting to sprout.
    The watermelons were planted after the squash, and the germination time for both is about the same.
    I am going to open one of the little sponges and see if it looks like the squash are starting to sprout, and if they are not, then I will start something else in there instead.

    I love hollyhocks, and I used to have some when I lived in Idaho.
    Once you have them, they come back each year (and seed prolifically), but they are expensive to buy when you get the started plants. I found some hollyhock seeds at Walmart; so I am going to plant those next and see if they will grow here in Alabama.
    Does anyone else that lives here in the South have hollyhocks ?
    It seems like some of the things that we grew up north do not do as well here (such as rhubarb); but on the other hand, some things do much better down here with the milder climate.
     
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  2. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
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    Talk about fast. I put six cabbage seeds in the aerogarden Thursday morning, two of them are up this morning. I'll hafta till the beds soon, the broccoli has it's true leaves already.

    I've been planning where to put things in the garden. Since the broccoli and cabbage prefer cool weather and peppers like hot weather I'll just plant the peppers in those beds after broccoli and cabbage are done.
    The potatoes will be done in time to plant a fall crop of cabbages, hopefully to make kraut this year.

    I make good plans.:) Too bad they quite often don't work out as planned.:oops:

    I forgot to mention Yvonne, My wife has hollyhocks growing around the "outhouse"
     
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  3. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    I just watched this short video, and it looks like a fairly easy way to grow veggies hydroponically. It would take a while to set everything up, and some money to buy all of the buckets and rain gutters; but once you had it connect together, you can always add more units, it looks like.
    This system can either be connected directly to an outside faucet, or to a rainbarrle if you do not want to keep the outside water connected.
    Since we just have that hard-packed clay that the plants have trouble growing in, we have been growing almost everything in pots anyway, and this would make sure that they had water and I would not have to be outside watering every day once it was set up.
    I think that this might be a worthwhile system for you, too, @Ken Anderson , since you do not have good growing soil either. Maybe even for @Chrissy Cross and @Frank Sanoica , since you both live where the weather is so hot in the summer.

     
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  4. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Thanks for the info, @Yvonne Smith but I don't plan on living here too long.


    Also, what would be my water source in Fresno? Filling a barrel with water @Yvonne Smith .

    I tagged you again because I added a question after you liked my post.
     
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  5. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    I think that you can either fill a barrel with water and then it slowly seeps out to keep the drip line filled for the growing system, or you can connect a hose to it and just leave it on low. The system has a small storage tank with a float, and when the water gets low in the storage tank, then it would activate the float and refill the storage tank. It is not a total hydroponics system since you fill the growing buckets with potting soil and the rain-gutter are underneath and keep the potting soil moist.
    I think that this would be a great system for your area, since it would not take very much water to keep the plants growing like it would if you planted them in the ground and then tried to water them every day. In the heat of summer, I water twice a day for the flowers and veggies, but most of that just bakes out of the hot clay.
    With this system, the plants are growing in 5 gallon buckets and with a top on the bucket, and just a hole for the plant to grow through; so most of the water would be kept inside the buckets, and just siphoned up from the raingutter system as it need more water.
    I wish that we had more of an area with sunshine here. This system would be awesome once it was set up, and a person could add to it when/if they wanted to, and it would keep the plants from drying out and baking in the ground.
    If you use your hose for watering , then you would want to use a 55 gallon barrel and just refill that when it got low, which should not be very often. If you do not use the hose to water, then you could just connect the hose to the storage tank and it would automatically let more water in when the float went down, just like a toilet does when you flush it.
    This system could actually be moved when you move if you wanted to take it along, although it would require a good sized truck or trailer to move it because the pieces are long.If you made a small system, then moving it would not be hard.
    There is a facebook group for this that I just joined, and if you are interested, I can add you to the group, @Chrissy Cross .
     
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  6. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Truth is I don't even want to go outside here now.

    I can only water 3 times a week...don't think I can have my hose on even on low...plus water is expensive here...I worry more about my water bill then my electric bill.

    I'd have to look into it...the issue here is always water.

    When I first moved here water was unmetered but that changed a few years ago. :(

    You can only water 3 times a week and only after 9 pm and before 6 AM. Also only a certain number of minutes for each station.
     
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  7. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    You are probably just as well off to buy your veggies from the store, Chrissy, since it gets too hot to be outside much. The watering should not be an issue if you used the barrel because you can fill it up during the days that you can water. Early in the morning would be a good time to do it because you can see better than you could at night.
    But for someone who didn't have good soil to grow in, and needed to conserve water and not have to spend time in the garden weeding and watering, I think that this system would work well once it was set up.
     
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  8. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    It does sound like the best system for me...

    I wonder how people who have pools adhere to the strict water guidelines here?
     
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  9. Ina I. Wonder

    Ina I. Wonder Very Well-Known Member
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    @Yvonne Smith , I've been using five gallon buckets for container gardening for a long time, and they tend to get very brittle in two or three years. But if you have a Shipley's Donut or other such place, you can generally get them to give you there three to five gallon buckets for free. Way back when, I worked for Shipley's for three years, and that's when I found out that their icings and fillings came in buckets. You could also check out your local bakeries for buckets. I think I once had to pay 50 cents per bucket, but generally I've gotten them for free. :)

    At one time young Michael worked for a roofing company, and most of the time, they throw away the old gutters. We just asked for permission to haul them off, which just made what they had to haul off less. Around here we have to pay to dump old construction materials.

    This way you don't have to worry so much about your start up costs. :p
     
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