Why Have Many Residents Left My Assisted Living?

Discussion in 'Money & Finances' started by Lon Tanner, Apr 14, 2021.

  1. Lon Tanner

    Lon Tanner Veteran Member
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    There are far less residents here now than when I first moved in 2017. There have been a few non COVID related deaths but the real problem appears to be money. Living here is great but it is expensive and the move outs have gone on to live with family or some other less expensive arrangement.
     
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  2. John Brunner

    John Brunner Veteran Member
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    You know, that's gotta be rough to roll the dice on one's longevity and hope for the worse.

    I'd hate to see folks bleed their resources dry and be stuck that way.
     
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  3. Lon Tanner

    Lon Tanner Veteran Member
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    True John---but every one knows before they move in what the cost will be. Each entry is asessed medically to determine care fees
     
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  4. John Brunner

    John Brunner Veteran Member
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    So I wonder what "ability to pay" assessment is done during the application process. I gotta think that the facility does not want for either party to be in this position. They must be looking at resources, annual costs, and actuarial tables.
     
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  5. Lon Tanner

    Lon Tanner Veteran Member
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    Most residents go through the application process with their care taker or family member. I made application with my daughter who is the emergency contact should anything happen to me. There was a initial modest entry fee and the first month rent but no discussion of future costs or ability to pay. Each residents emergency contact is kept informed on a regular basis on the status of the resident.
     
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  6. John Brunner

    John Brunner Veteran Member
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    That really surprises me.
     
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  7. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Senior Staff
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    When I was a paramedic, I got to know a few patients who had been admitted to the one really good assisted living facility in the area only to be booted a few years later after their insurance ran out. I think sometimes these assessments are made on the basis of an anticipated lifespan that, once crossed, means that other arrangements will have to be made. The same was true for those who were patients in a good-quality nursing home, only to be transferred to something that Medicaid would pay for years later. Not everyone is able to plan their life out in the way you have, @Lon Tanner or, if they were able, not everyone had that as their priority as they were living the healthier part of their lives. Some of us may have been downright irresponsible, while others tried to strike a balance between experiencing life and enjoying it while we were healthy, and preparing for the latter part of it.

    I could have stayed in the paper industry long enough to retire with a good retirement package, or I might have opted to stay with the college, as it was rare for anyone to be fired or laid off from a state college, and that would have left me with a great retirement package, but I decided that I wanted to do something different.

    Although I'd love to have more than I have right now, I enjoyed doing different things with my life, and some of my best memories were the products of poor choices. At any rate, I have what I have, and it's too late to do anything about it now, so I may as well be satisfied. As should you, because you can live out the rest of your years in comfort.
     
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    Last edited: Apr 14, 2021
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  8. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Veteran Member
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    They are leaving because, well Hell, everyones leaving California.
     
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  9. Trevalius Guyus

    Trevalius Guyus Well-Known Member
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    And, unfortunately, they're moving to Austin, TX! The growth here is horrendous. Huge apartment complexes go up, seemingly overnight. The traffic and air gets worse, daily. Things get more expensive. A lot down the street from me had one house on it. It now has four! And on, and on, and.......
     
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  10. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    Dunno. As I have alluded to in the past, even if I had millions to spend and no matter what reasoning is used, if I was living in a place that wouldn’t allow outside contact and be pretty much trapped in a single room for an undetermined amount of time, I’d move.
    There are thousands of places to die but I like the idea of living life totally free or at least as free as my body and brain will allow.
     
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  11. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Veteran Member
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    Moving to Colorado, also. When we moved from Colorado in late 2007, we were noticing quite a number of California license plates and we still see some now.
    There are still plenty of people that live in Southern California. The freeways show that.
     
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  12. John Brunner

    John Brunner Veteran Member
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    We all know life is full of tradeoffs. I've mentioned before some of the tradeoffs I made moving to a rural area and leaving the depth cultural attractions that the DC region has to offer.

    A major upside to living here is being around all the critters (and this area is rural but not remote.) Boris B. and I were discussing foxes, and just the other morning at 4AM mine were back, yapping right at my bedroom window.

    The other upside that erased any residual misgivings is I am not as COVID-bound as I would have been up north. Not only is there tons of space between us (my county has 70 people per mi² versus the 3,000 per mi² county that I left), no one here is gonna leverage the excuse to display their [aggressively ignorant] righteous indignation.

    But there are still times I can see the attraction to living as Lon is. I've often thought of getting up, having someone cook breakfast and clean up, then going out and doing as I please, coming back for lunch with the same "done for me" benefits, doing as I please, then the same for dinner...with no housework, no yard work, no home repairs, no shopping, absolutely none of life's overhead. It truly is living as royalty has...maybe better than most. There is a big freedom component to it, excepting the current environment. Of course, those are my thoughts absent any direct experience, right?
     
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  13. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Senior Staff
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    I am in agreement with @Bobby Cole on this one, and even if we had lots of money and could live anywhere, neither of us would choose to live like @Lon Tanner lives.
    Someone else makes all of his choices for him, important choices, like having freedom to leave the facility whenever he wants to, and see his family when he wants to. Choosing not to visit family because of the lockdown rules is much different than being FORCED not to be able to see other people.
    For about a year, Lon has only seen whoever brings the food to his room, for the most part, and he has to be continuously tested for covid, whether he or anyone else there is sick or not.
    Whatever they make, is what he has to eat, and only at the prescribed mealtimes. Even though he said that he is able to fix some foods in his apartment, that is just not the same as having the freedom to choose your own food, and prepare it the way that you want to, and have as much or as little as you feel like eating of each thing.

    I am very glad that Lon is happy where he is at, and it appears that this life suits him a lot; but it is not something that I would do if I had any other options.
     
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  14. Hoot Crawford

    Hoot Crawford Very Well-Known Member
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    Different strokes for different folks. My mother and step father moved into a senior facility that is run by the Methodist church when they were about 90. Endowment was about $250k. Monthly fees vary by level of care. They started out in the independent care section, and after about 4 years moved into assisted living section, and about a year or so ago into a memory care unit. My step father passed away last fall, My mother is in the best place for her, the care is excellent, and she can never be forced out even if she can no longer pay the monthly fees. True, for about 8 months or so they were not allowed visitors, but that was a necessary precaution.

    Lon likes where he is, and I say God Bless him.

    YMMV
     
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  15. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    Heck, during the times when I had to motel or hotel it whilst on a contract, other than changing towels I really do not like maid service that much. Bring me the sheets, I’ll make my own bed. Other than my wife bringing me my coffee once in a while or being waited on at a restaurant, I have no desire to be served by anyone for anything.

    It’s a given that everyone is different, thank God, but I like getting dirty. I like mowing the lawn and fixing things just as much as I like to fix my own food.
    I guess one could say that I like retirement but I do not want to be retired in the conventional sense. Yesterday I replaced a window for someone and I have a cabinet to build for another person this weekend and I have an enclosure to do for yet another person. No heavy duty commitments mind you, but if there’s something to do I generally try to do it and since I do not like people around me whilst I work, I do most of what I do by myself.

    Now, if at some point that I couldn’t enjoy being alive, able to do whatever and free ....well, that hasn’t happened yet so.....
     
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