From Urbanist To Ruralist And Now?

Discussion in 'Places I Have Lived' started by Boris Boddenov, Jan 27, 2021.

  1. Boris Boddenov

    Boris Boddenov Well-Known Member
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    Except for brief stints at Forts Jackson and Campbell, I spent the first 33 yrs. in Baltimore Md.

    Then we went rural, and had to learn about tractors, chain saws, tillers, growing vegs., and planting trees (I personally planted 1,000 over an eight year period in the 70s and 80s).

    Now at 77 with both upper extremities in the category of damaged goods, I yearn for a row house with postage stamp yards, or, even better, concrete yards. But frankly, I'm afraid even to visit my old city -- let alone live there -- unless escorted within an M1A2C Abrams tank, accompanied by a platoon of force recon Marines or US Army Rangers.
     
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  2. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    @Boris Boddenov Welcome to Seniors Only club! Our members are from all over the map, hope you like it here!
     
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  3. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Veteran Member
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    I learned tractors, tillers and other farm equipment on a hog farm my step-parents had in northeastern Indiana when I was in high school. The old FFA and 4-H thing with neighboring farm students like me.

    Whenever we go to a County Fair, wife and I always stop by the farm/ranch equipment and livestock areas.

    Actually, we have a display now (toy/miniature size 1:32 scale) of farm equipment and corrals of livestock on our counter between kitchen and dining room. When the virus thing isn't going on, we have gone to a local livestock auction on sale day to look and learn.

    As far as Baltimore goes, it definitely has its crime areas. Just like south of us in Denver.
     
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  4. Peter Renfro

    Peter Renfro Very Well-Known Member
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    I was born rural and remain that way.
     
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  5. Mary Miller

    Mary Miller Well-Known Member
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    Boris! It is I, Natasha! Welcome to the board.
    I grew up suburban and after graduating college, got a job milking cows and did not look back.
    I had a bad fall off a horse which started my hip deteriorating and then, years later, while cutting wood, I moved a cinder block so I would not trip over it. I backed over it, anyway, while pulling down some large grapevines, fell and finished my hip and started my shoulder down the road.
    I put my last cow in the freezer a couple of years ago but I missed her so much, after I got a new hip, that I got a bottle baby last July to help keep me and my two sheep busy. I intend to teach her to be an ox.
    My parts don't work too well either but, I told my daughter I intend to be like the Terminator skeleton who crawled after Sarah Connor in the foundry, with only one good arm to get the job done.
    I hope someone can build you a raised garden to plant. I have some catalpa seeds to start if you like.
    ; )
    PS we eat Squirrels:cool:
     
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  6. John Brunner

    John Brunner Veteran Member
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    I was born in rural Indiana, then moved to Northern Virginia in the early 60s. I've been to Baltimore a number of times, but it's been a while since I've felt like taking my life in my own hands.

    I retired 10 years ago to a very rural county outside of Charlottesville. I have over 50 acres. I'm not sure what will happen as I wind down.
     
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  7. Peter Renfro

    Peter Renfro Very Well-Known Member
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    I've always liked oxen. We no longer keep any critters. Used to raise three calf a year,. We would trade off one of the calves for pork and turkey. Just got rid of the last of the chickens two years ago. Been talking about getting some Guinea for tick control, but animals really tie you to home.
     
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  8. John Brunner

    John Brunner Veteran Member
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    That last part about always having to "be there" is why I never got goats or chickens.

    I once thought of getting Guinea as guard-birds. I understand that once they imprint onto your property (I believe there's a process to that), they are fiercely territorial.
     
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  9. Beth Gallagher

    Beth Gallagher Veteran Member
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    Guineas make the most awful noise.
     
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  10. John Brunner

    John Brunner Veteran Member
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  11. Boris Boddenov

    Boris Boddenov Well-Known Member
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    You sound like a gen-yoo-ine country girl rather than Natasha who believes that any kind of physical exertion is detrimental to one's health.

    By the way, the squirrels here are gray squirrels and it looks like a half dozen of them wouldn't provide enough meat for a small child's meal. I imagine that if you use birdshot to bag 'em, the shot is heavier than the meat. Besides, you gotta be careful of damaging your choppers.
     
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  12. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Senior Staff
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    Many years ago, when I was living way out in the country in Western Washington , we got some guinea hens at the local auction sale. There were somewhere around a dozen of them, packed into a crate for transportation.
    We got them home, turned them loose and they happily squawked their way around our house and yard. They all went in a long line, making noise incessantly, for early morning until they went to roost at night.
    We had them for about two weeks, and by then we were so tired of hearing that squawking all the time that we caught them all one night after they were soundly sleeping, and the next morning they were back at the auction sale in their little wooden crate.
    That was my first and last experience with having guinea hens.
     
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  13. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Veteran Member
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    To be honest, I didn't know, until I done internet research, that milking/dairy cows could be eaten. This is after they can no longer provide good enough milk for the dairy industry. However, the meat isn't as high quality as beef cattle is. The article I read stated that dairy cows can be used for hamburger or dog food, since the meat isn't that high of quality.
     
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  14. John Brunner

    John Brunner Veteran Member
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    Laying hens have the same lifecycle. Once they've reached end-of-productivity, their meat is used for canned soups & stews, but won't be sold at the meat counter.
     
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  15. Mary Miller

    Mary Miller Well-Known Member
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    Amazingly, we get a lot of fresh road kill. Their tails flip them up to hit the cars as they are running across hwy 45 and I am up and down that road 6 times a day. I only pick up the ones in good condition. My daughter does taxidermy and made me a tree topper for Christmas out of one.
    We eat other things. Squirrel is just in reference to 'Moose and..."
     
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