Who Is The Real Racist?

Discussion in 'Education & Learning' started by Martin Alonzo, Jan 9, 2017.

  1. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    Agree with you ! :)
     
    #16
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  2. Martin Alonzo

    Martin Alonzo Veteran Member
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    The answer if you want to influence a country it is easy control what they know. Start with education then move on to media and in time you will get them to believe anything you want.
    By the look of what is going on now only the older generation is waking up.
     
    #17
  3. Denise Happyfeet

    Denise Happyfeet Very Well-Known Member
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    Yes, and I remember the numbers were very high for Seniors voting for Trump. I think you are so right. Didn't people like Hitler start on the young people asap when he was taking over? That, sadly, happens here too, especially if the parents either are for the lessons, or just aren't paying attention to what their children are being taught in school. Pier pressure is out of control too, bullying etc. I have to admit if I had children/grand-children I would be afraid as if I were sending them into a battlefield:(
     
    #18
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  4. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    Particularly when they are being taught that they are smarter and more aware than their parents, and that there are no absolutes.
     
    #19
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  5. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    @Denise Happyfeet Because I know and have known many people who Home School their children I can tell you that most of these homeschoolers do have access to TV and Computers, but they are learning tools, not something they are allowed to waste their minds watching "trash", etc. on. And as for exploring the world, since they are homeschooled, their parents can take them anywhere and turn these trips into history, geography, or science lessons, etc. Here in Louisiana Home Schoolers have their own sports teams that play against each other, they have field trips that they take together, and many other activities where the different Home Schooling Families get together and socialize with each other, etc.

    Those who are homeschooled are in a far better position than those children who are in Public School because in public schools recesses have been all but eliminated, lunch periods have been cut to the max allowing no time to talk with other students and barely enough time to eat...definitely not enough time to eat properly for good digestion. And they cannot learn anything but what is on the curriculum that has to be taught by the Teacher. They do not have opportunities to explore and use their imaginations...this would be considered bad conduct and not acceptable in public school. And those in public schools are given so much homework that even their at home time is filled with trying to get this homework done before going to bed.

    Home Schooled children for the most part score higher on tests than public school children do. They score higher on the entrance tests for College too. But most of all they are independent individuals who know how to think for theirselves and actually enjoy learning.
    http://www.home-school.com/groups/LA.html
     
    #20
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017
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  6. Martin Alonzo

    Martin Alonzo Veteran Member
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    The school system came out with the idea of no one gets left behind. So in reality we bring everyone back to the slowest person. That sounds intelligent and everyone get a trophy so the person in last place gets credit for being last. The system is design to make everyone stupid and it is working
     
    #21
  7. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    A lot of people don't realize how easy homeschooling is these days. Not to suggest that there's nothing to it, but many people reject the idea on the basis that they are not teachers, they don't believe that they are capable of putting together curriculum and classroom materials, and because they are afraid that their children won't learn to socialize. In reality, there are tons of curriculum available, including workbooks, DVDs, and computer-aided material. For that matter, full online programs are available at all levels, and there are homeschooling groups in many parts of the country that allow for socialization. Although laws differ from state to state, with homeschooling being all but illegal in some states, such as California; in other states - like Maine - homeschooled children have the right to be enrolled in any classes or programs that are available from the public school, since their parents are still paying to support the public school. We homeschooled our nephew, but enrolled him in the choir, music, and performing arts programs at the public school.
     
    #22
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017
  8. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    Here in Louisiana Home Schoolers can even go to the School Board and get their books to teach from if they want.
     
    #23
  9. Ina I. Wonder

    Ina I. Wonder Very Well-Known Member
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    I have to agree that home schooling is best if the parent is committed to it. I only went to school for 2&1/2 years as a child. My father didn't believe girls should be taught above the fifth grade. But I fell in love with books and learning when I was seven, saw my first library, and received my first county library card. From that day on, I read everything I could get my hands on.

    When I was about 12, I learned you could get the curriculum for whatever grade you wanted from the schools at the beginning of each school year. I added the named books to my library list each year. So my education came to me in that fashion. I guess you could say I'm self taught.

    When I was 35, I decided to go college, so I put my fear of rejection and failure aside, and I went to take the entrance exams. You can not imagine my shock I was when I not only passed, but I was given a TASP exemption. I forget what those letter stood for, but it meant I didn't have to take all the further tests that most of the other new students had to take for placement. All my classes were honors courses.

    What really surprised me was that more than half the new student had to take remedial courses before they could even get to the 101 beginner's cases. It made me wonder what kids in public school were/weren't being taught.
     
    #24
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2017
  10. Kate Ellery

    Kate Ellery Veteran Member
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    Two of my gradaughter suffered from racism,when they were young ,My family is Australian born and bred as far back as I know of ,however my daughter married a young man from Vietnam in 1990 who's family had made there home in Australia back when my ex SIL was only a small child .

    The Grandchildren ( girls) suffered when they started school ,being called racist / slang names useally reserved for Australian indigious people.,as well as other racist names

    I don't believe little children ,like 5/6 year olds make up the names ,they must learn from parents / carers
    I had another example from a man who lived on the opitsite side of the road from me and about 6 houses down
    He stopped me in the street one day as I was walking my two granddaughters around to the corner shop
    The GD 's would have been about 4 and 7 at the time ..he said would you mind not walking on my side of the street with those "non Australian children" ....they are Aust ..they were born here
    You'd think a man in his 50 's would know better
     
    #25
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  11. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    I grew up in the UP of Michigan, lived in Iowa for a brief time, spent about twelve years in Southern California, more than twenty in the Rio Grande Valley of Texas, a couple of years in North Carolina, and about fifteen years or so in Maine, and I have to say that I haven't come across very many racist people. The very idea of racism doesn't make sense to me. Given that every race of people that I am aware of can show examples of good and bad, smart and stupid, ambitious and lazy, trustworthy and untrustworthy, I don't see how anyone can't realize that the traits we like or dislike about another person are based on something other than skin color or racial origins.

    I don't get it, and I can't say that I've come across it often, even in the Rio Grande Valley where I was among the minority. Attitudes there had more to do with language and common experiences than race, I think. I don't think it's unreasonable for people to give preference to those who grew up among them. Here in Maine, although we have very few minorities, those of us who weren't born and raised in Maine, and whose parents weren't from Maine, are "from away" and discriminated against on that basis to some extent. Being from away, that can be annoying but I get it. Having grown up in a town where I was related to everyone, I would have expected someone local to be given preference. But that's not racism.

    I did come across it in North Carolina. While I did not get the impression that I was hated by any of the black people who lived there, some of whom I am still friends with, I did come across some white people who were clearly racist, and that included the pastor of a church that we had attended for a couple of months who, for some reason, felt called upon to tell a racist joke from the pulpit. We didn't go back. Then, for a short time, we had a landlord who blatantly treated his black tenants a whole lot more rudely than he did us. These were people who probably didn't even consider themselves to be racist, since this was the culture they grew up in. I know that it exists, but I don't get it.
     
    #26
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  12. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    Perfect reasoning - I've never understood it either
     
    #27
  13. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    @Kate Ellery - although I've heard these examples so many times, its always like the first
    It upsets me greatly - hope the experience has strengthened you and those around you :)
     
    #28
  14. Martin Alonzo

    Martin Alonzo Veteran Member
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    All racist rhetoric goes back to politico correctness that has been put in place to divide and separate people. This is perfect for control if you are fighting amongst yourselves you miss the real enemy. The idea of them and us goes back a long ways and now they are using it to fight to break up humanity. The real puppet masters are having a good laugh watching the politico correctness destroy humanity.
     
    #29
  15. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Veteran Member
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    Actually, I've done some research on racism and it was quite interesting. Where we currently live, the demographics is some 40% black and we were definitely not use to that high of a population where we lived in NC or in Colorado. In my research, I found out that there are whites that will absolutely not live/move to an area that has a high population of blacks. Then again, there are white that have no problem living in that type of area. Seems like a lot of folks where we live, came from areas of high populations of blacks. Another interesting thing, there are blacks that will and won't live among whites. The blacks that live around us are super nice and we have talked to many. Unfortunately, our city also has it's share of "not-so-nice" blacks......as well as whites. We also have a fairly large, and growing, Indian (India) population here. The Hispanic and Asian population here is pretty low.

    Even though that word "racism" is still going, there are areas of the U.S. where whites, blacks and Indians get along fine.......like our area.
     
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