Visual & Written Ditties For Writer's Inspiration

Discussion in 'Reading & Writing' started by Lara Moss, Feb 24, 2016.

  1. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    Yes, I think metaphors are more subtle, whereas similes are something of a bludgeoning implement. One could describe a political or sporting fiasco in metaphorical terms as a train crash or go for something along the lines of 'like a train that went off a cliff. '

    Like most forms of communication, a lot depends on context. I think similes work well for emphasising the ridiculous. If I used the phrase 'about as much use as an ashtray on a motorbike,' there's an element of the absurd about it.
     
    #51
  2. Lara Moss

    Lara Moss Very Well-Known Member
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    Ahh, now I see what you are saying. I never looked at it that way before….never beyond the difference by definition. You've gone a step beyond the definition to incorporate the impact it makes on the receiver/reader. I always thought it was an equal impact, just a different usage. Interesting. I get it.
     
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  3. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    I studied linguistics, so I'm a bit of a language bore..

    In some ways, I look at the metaphor/simile relationship as similar to that of adjectives and adverbs. The adjective describes, but the adverb gies that bit further, giving more emphasis.
     
    #53
  4. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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  5. Lara Moss

    Lara Moss Very Well-Known Member
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    Got "writer's block"?...

    13551765.jpg
     
    #55
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  6. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    Another method of emphasising, or foregrounding as the linguists like to call it, is repetition. It's a technique used more in poetry, though you see it in prose as well. So, for example, if you were wanting to establish a person's connection with a particular place, you might say, "This is the street that blah, blah, blah" and then start several subsequent sentences or lines with the same words.
     
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  7. Lara Moss

    Lara Moss Very Well-Known Member
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    Yes Tom, very effective. Here's a technique for character development…:)

    writers_mug_she-rb503262d5323460483ddf16094d5cf73_x7jgr_8byvr_324.jpg
     
    #57
  8. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    Sometimes, even a classic novel will give one a good example of things you shouldn't really do. While I would concede that Dracula is a great story, it's not actually a very good novel. Most of the characters are too one-dimensional. Stoker uses multiple narrators, which is a perfectly reasonable thing to do, but most of their voices sound the same. The only real exception is van Helsing, but he is given a comedy Dutch accent which doesn't help at all.

    Compare Dracula with The Woman in White, for example. This is another book that uses multiple narrators, but Wilkie Collins gives his characters much more personality and individual voices. I would have love to see how Collins would have written Dracula.
     
    #58
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  9. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    Entries with the category: Writing Tips From Writers
    Tips and advice from authors to help you to improve your writing.
    [​IMG]
     
    #59
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  10. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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  11. Lara Moss

    Lara Moss Very Well-Known Member
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    I clicked on your writing tips link…lots of good tips there. One said to write your draft and then let it rest. I would add to that to write your first draft as if you're telling yourself the story.
     
    #61
  12. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    I liked the tip:
    "Use the right word, not its second cousin. Use good grammar. As to the Adjective: when in doubt, strike it out. God only exhibits his thunder and lightning at intervals, and so they always command attention. These are God's adjectives. You thunder and lightning too much; the reader ceases to get under the bed, by and by". Mark Twain
     
    #62
  13. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    People said I'd never be a humorous writer. Well, they're not laughing now.
     
    #63
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  14. Lara Moss

    Lara Moss Very Well-Known Member
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    …just thought I'd confess that I had a confusing typo in #61. I meant "good tips". Not "god tips". There are times when God tips are good too haha
     
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  15. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    I don't see a typo. :)
     
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  16. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    I think at this time in my life and with the "crowd" I've been mainly conversing with...I'd better stick to writing books for infants and toddlers since my vocabulary skills have been in hibernation for the most part since I've become a Granny. :)
     
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  17. Lara Moss

    Lara Moss Very Well-Known Member
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  18. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    Typo was the other Marx brother.o_O
     
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  19. Lara Moss

    Lara Moss Very Well-Known Member
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  20. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    When I studied 19th-century literature, my tutor was an American lady who was very into Gothic novels. I think that Toni Morrison's quote about familiarising the strange would appeal greatly to my old tutor. That, essentially, is what made the best Gothic novelists so good. Wilkie Collins (I love Wilkie Collins!) was brilliant at that. He understood the value of the normal, everyday setting and how to use the familiar locations as the scene for strange events. That brought the Gothic to a readership that could empathise with the characters much more than in a novel by, say, Ann Radcliffe. Radcliffe's novels are good, escapist hokum, but nobody can really identify with big castles in Italy. Jane Austen's Northanger Abbey is a wonderful parody of Radcliffe, albeit a quite gentle one.
     
    #70
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  21. Lara Moss

    Lara Moss Very Well-Known Member
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    Tom…and then of course Edgar Allan Poe. I have his 1st Edition leather-bound "Tales of Mystery and Imagination". Illustrations are equally incredible and haunting by Harry Clarke…who by the way was Irish (1889-1931) and today is St Patricks Day. The book belonged to my Great Grandfather.
    Illustrations by this forgotten illustrator (he also did Faust, Hans Christian Anderson, and others): http://50watts.com/Harry-Clarke-Illustrations-for-E-A-Poe
     
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  22. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    #72
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2016
  23. Lara Moss

    Lara Moss Very Well-Known Member
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    While reading or writing….you become the character if it's good:

    1082065844.jpeg 1082065823.jpeg 1082065834.jpeg 1082065814.jpeg
     
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  24. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    Does anyone today, still get "Writer's Cramp"?

    [​IMG]
     
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  25. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    When focal hand dystonia affects writing, this is called writer’s cramp. Writing can become painful and written work less legible. There are two types: simple and dystonic.
     
    #75

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