Traditional Grade School Songs

Discussion in 'Education & Learning' started by Corie Henson, Jul 14, 2015.

  1. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    When I was in grade school (and until college), the medium of instruction was English and the curriculum was that of American orientation. In class, particularly in the first and second grade, we were taught English songs. The class would be singing as their respite from the lessons.

    One such song that still lingers on my mind is KATY. It was not explained why we needed to learn that song except that it is an American song. It goes like K-K-K-Katy, beautiful Katy, you're the only G-G-G-Girl that I adore, when the mo-moon shines, over the mountain....
     
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  2. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    One man barbershop quartet!
     
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  3. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    @Joe Riley thanks very much for the short video. Yes, it's that song that I would learn later was intended for the army and that Katy was the apple of the eye of the army men.

    Another grade school song that I remember is the Old Millstream. It goes like this....
    Down by the old millstream where I first met you
    With your eyes so blue, dressed in gingham too.

    Can someone supply the continuing lines of that song?
     
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  4. Hannah Davis

    Hannah Davis Active Member
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    Yes, I remember the school songs as well. I don't remember ever singing K-K-K Katy though. We did sing Down by the Old Millstream, let me see if I can remember the words.

    Down by the old mill stream, where I first met you. It was there I knew that I loved you true. You were sixteen, my village queen, down by the old millstream.

    Not sure if I got all the words right or even if I missed a few lines, didn't cheat to go look the song up online. Anyway, do you remember BINGO, you the dog with the name where the letters disappear?
     
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    Last edited: Jul 15, 2015
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  5. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    Here's another"Bingo" singing "Old Mill Steam"!
     
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  6. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    @Joe Riley thanks again for the video. I hope next time you post an mp3 with your own voice for the song, hahahaaa.

    @Hannah Davis what a truly wonderful song for children, that mill stream song was the first romantic song we learned in school.

    There is one song that I forgot the title but it goes like this...
    This old man, he played one, he played knick-knack on ...
    With the knick-knack paddywack give the dog a bone, this old man came running home.

    The song advances in number like Shoe for Two, Knee for Three, etc. I hope someone can supply the lyrics again but no fair peeking in the internet. This thread is for reminiscing and not cheating, hahahaaa.
     
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  7. Pat Baker

    Pat Baker Well-Known Member
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    I wonder why you had to learn those songs in school. I never heard that Katy song until now.
     
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  8. Jennifer Graves

    Jennifer Graves Active Member
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    I don't believe I've ever heard of this song. When I was in school we didn't learn many songs at all, and we definitely didn't put on any performances that would require us to learn any songs.
     
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  9. Carlota Clemens

    Carlota Clemens Well-Known Member
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    I remember to have learned a tribal song by the days I made it to elementary school. My teacher used to say that we won't be here without those native tribes that subsist today, hence the importance to learn at least such a traditional I can remember some chorus but I have forgotten the name, tribal title name too.

    However one that I can remember as traditional grade school song was this


    I don't remember either why we should learn this, but I guess it was due to the teacher being British, LOL
     
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  10. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    @Carlota Clemens, that song London Bridge is used here as a folk song and also a game song. There are 2 children holding and swaying both hands while the other children would be passing under those connected hand. When the song ends at my fair lady, the child underneath the arms will be the IT and out of the game.

    Addendum, from what my husband said, that the London bridge in the song is a plain bridge and that one in the video is actually the Tower Bridge.
     
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  11. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    Pardon me for continuing with this thread. I just want to reminisce my grade school days when we were enjoying the class singing of American songs. As what @Pat Baker said, why the need to learn Katy. That's also the question in my mind now.

    Clementine is a sad song about a girl whose father perished in a mine. I remember our teacher telling the story of Clementine that it happened during the gold rush, our teacher said. When our class had memorized the song and we did the maiden performed in the classroom, I think half of the class were crying.

    In a cavern, down the canyon,
    excavating for a mine,
    there's a miner, forty-niner,
    and his daughter Clementine.

    Take note of how we pronounced cavern and canyon as KAYE-VERN and CANE-YON.
     
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  12. Carlota Clemens

    Carlota Clemens Well-Known Member
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    No problem Corie, this thread is interesting and really funny when it comes to the London Bridge, particularly the fact your hubby is pointing at, LOL

    Never heard that song about Clementine, but I bet it was fascinating listening to your teacher telling the story behind those grade school songs :)
     
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  13. John Donovan

    John Donovan Active Member
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    I remember learning Oh, Susannah when I was young. I also remember how the whole class loved that song, and how my father told me how old it actually was and he even taught me the first verses in Romanian.

    For those who don't know it, here are a few lyrics:

    I come from Alabama
    With a banjo on my knee
    I'm going to Louisiana,
    My true love for to see.


    Oh, Susannah,
    Oh don't you cry for me
    For I come from Alabama
    With a banjo on my knee.


    As you can see, it's a really simple and fun song.
     
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  14. Bill Boggs

    Bill Boggs Very Well-Known Member
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    We sang those songs, too. I haven't thought about them since i don't remember when. That first one mentioned by Corie is, "My Darling Clementine." My daddy hummed and sang that song from my earliest memories.

    Near a cavern, across from a canyon,
    Excavating for a mine,
    Lived a miner, forty-niner
    And his daughter Clementine

    Oh my Darling, Oh my Darling,
    Oh my Darling Clementine.
    You are lost and gone forever,
    Dreadful sorry, Clementine.

    Light she was and like a fairy,
    And her shoes were number nine
    Herring boxes without topses
    Sandals were for Clementine.

    CHORUS:

    Drove she ducklings to the water
    Every morning just at nine,
    Hit her foot against a splinter
    Fell into the foaming brine.

    CHORUS:

    Ruby lips above the water,
    Blowing bubbles soft and fine,
    But alas, I was no swimmer,
    So I lost my Clementine.

    CHORUS:

    How I missed her! How I missed her!
    How I missed my Clementine,
    Till I kissed her little sister,
    And forgot my Clementine.

    CHORUS:

    Then the miner, forty-niner,
    Soon began to peak and pine,
    Thought he oughter join his daughter,
    Now he's with his Clementine.

    CHORUS:
    In the church yard in the canyon
    Where the myrtle doth entwine
    There grows roses and other posies
    Fertilized by Clementine.



    Read more: Traditional - Oh My Darling Clementine Lyrics | MetroLyrics
     
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  15. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    @John Donovan, we learned that Susannah song but it did not linger much. You see, grade schoolers have their favorites and the non-favorites will be easily forgotten. @Bill Boggs now you had corrected me when I said the father perished but it seems it was the daughter who first perished. I think your version is the complete one. Take note, we were taught an abridged version - short so pupils will easily memorize.

    This is one song that we really didn't like. It goes like this...
    Wind, wind, wind the bobbin wind, wind, wind the bobbin
    Pull, pull and tap, tap, tap.

    Such a very short song but our teacher said it would invigorate us because we used to sing that with appropriate action.
     
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  16. John Donovan

    John Donovan Active Member
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    Although our whole class loved it, it didn't last long in our case either. We were young, and we soon found another favorite to take its place. It still has a special place in my heart and mind, though.
     
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  17. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    I remember our 5th grade class. We had a book of songs and from what I remember, it is American. The songs come in with the scale of notes such that my classmates who know how to play piano can play the melody of those songs at home. Some of those good songs have slipped my mind for now but I'm sure I will recall them later.

    In our grade 2 classroom, this was a hit....
    Row, row, row your boat gently down the stream
    Merrily, merrily, merrily, merrily, life is but a dream.
     
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  18. Dave Sun

    Dave Sun Well-Known Member
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    How about ring around the rosy
    Pocket full of posie
    Ashes, ashes, all fall down.
     
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  19. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    We were not taught that in school. But mind you, kids in the streets have a version of that. They would be in a circle with one player inside that circle while they are singing with action. The song goes like this...
    Sasara ang bulaklak, - this means the petals of the flower are closing
    bubuka ang bulaklak - the petals are now opening
    Papasok ang reyna - the queen is inside
    sasayaw-sayaw - the queen is dancing

    It is child's play that reverberated with that catchy tune. And you know what, a known composer made that into a song and was performed by a popular group which was a hit in the early 2000s. The title is Bulaklak.
     
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  20. Jennifer Graves

    Jennifer Graves Active Member
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    I remember this one. It was around the same time as London Bridge
     
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  21. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    Although there is some dispute, the origins of the song has been attributed to the plague, a rosy rash being a symptom of the plague, while posies of herbs were used to ward off the disease, and the ashes a reference to the cremation of the bodies and the burning of the homes of the afflicted. Pretty gruesome stuff.
     
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  22. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    I had read in one article a long time ago that the folk song London Bridge is about the black plague and that it is falling down means collapsing due to the disease and once dead, the little girl becomes a fair lady. I don't really know the truth of the matter because I also have read an email about the song 12 Days of Christmas that the numbers were codes written by the olden Christians to avoid persecution. That the Partridge is Jesus, the 3 french hens is the Father, Son, Holy Ghost. But then Snopes said that's false, an invention and the song has no meaning at all.
     
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  23. Jennifer Graves

    Jennifer Graves Active Member
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    I never heard anything about the origins of "London Bridge". That is so neat. The speculated origins are always my favorite aspect of any song! A song, or bedtime story, or old wives tales almost always have a history thats more interesting than the song itself.

    Here's an interesting one about the Jack Horner nursery rhyme.
     
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  24. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    We were taught the song Old McDonald's farm. That song lasted for more than a year, it was still sung in the next year's class. When I became an adult, I was surprised to hear the song, in the same tune but in a different fashion. Our version is the simple one like...

    Old McDonald had a farm, heeya, heeya, hoo.
    And on his farm he had some goats, heeya, heeya, hoo.
    With a mee, mee here and a mee, mee there,
    With a mee and a mee and a mee, mee, mee.

    But the real version, I believe, is much different from what we were taught in school.
     
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  25. Jennifer Graves

    Jennifer Graves Active Member
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    its been a long time since I thought about that song. I used to sing it to my son when he was 3 or 4. I would replace the animal's name with his name. He always got suck a kick out of that. Same with me getting his name tattooed on my arm. 50 times a day I would have to tell him what the word was. I would tell him its his name, and he would smile from ear to ear.
     
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