The Hunt

Discussion in 'Tall Tales & Fabrications' started by Bill Boggs, Jul 31, 2017.

  1. Bill Boggs

    Bill Boggs Very Well-Known Member
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    Many years ago, living in Texas, I would occasionally go hunting with a family member in Colorado. He had a large property west of Colorado Springs and he had built a small cabin that would accommodate four hunters at a time. If you went with him you walked a half mile up hill from where you had to park your vehicle. He wouldn’t allow one closer to the cabin. You could only take what you packed in. Hunting with this relative, you hunted game by walking, slipping up on an elk or a deer as close as you could get with out spooking the animal. You could walk all day and not get a decent shot, one that a hunter would take. You needed to be both a good shot with whatever weapon you were carrying and a pretty good stalker if you wanted to bring home the bacon, as it were. That’s the way I grew up hunting. And I have hunted black tail in the Marfa and Ft Davis areas of Texas the same way. So I remember the first time a couple of friends took me out to check their feeders in the Texas white tail countryside. They put out corn and other feeds before deer season so the deer would walk up to the feeders and eat and they kept checking and restocking the feed troughs so the deer would keep coming back and therefore would keep feeding from those troughs well into deer season. I didn’t know hunters did this and I didn’t know they built blinds as close to the feeders as they could get them so they could get a direct, pointblank shot as the deer fed. After going out with them and listening to their conversations, I wrote this poem. It’s just a poem and doesn’t reflect my thinking, on guns or hunting, merely my thinking on blinds and feeders. It would be a different if we needed these animals for food but we don’t. This could as easily be about big boy’s toys. It’s just a poem, of sorts.


    The Hunt

    Sportsmen on a hunt for small white-tailed
    deer, big rough men, sporting tattoos, hunting
    knives, thirty-ought-sixes with scopes, nine
    millimeter side arms, and big men’s boots with
    long sleeved shirts and expensive wrist
    watches wearing big hats and give-me caps.
    Capable men herding four-wheel drive pickup
    trucks and SUVs down winding, dusty ranch
    roads to blinds set up close to feeding troughs,
    death camps for timid deer who come quiet and
    unsuspecting to feed on pellets when hunters
    hid in blinds wait in ambush at point blank range
    for their helpless prey.

    Afterwards men brag of skill and exceptional
    shots as they rehash their endurance of hardship
    and patience in cold weather, under stress as
    they haul their gutted kill to lockers to be
    turned into sausage and roasts before heading
    home to celebrate the holidays and good cheer
    with family and friends over big meals of
    turkey and dressing with cranberry sauce and
    all the trimmings of a bountiful harvest.


    Men who unwrap and show off new rifles and shotguns
    dropped off by Santa on his quest to bring Christmas
    joy and happiness to children everywhere.

    Sportsmen

    ready to defend the Constitution
    the Second Amendment
    And next year’s kill of white tailed deer
    lead unknowing to their Christmas slaughter.
     
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    Shirley Martin and Chris Ladewig like this.
  2. Shirley Martin

    Shirley Martin Veteran Member
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    My grandson-in-law hunts deer. They eat what they kill so I guess it is justified. He brought me a roast and I wrapped it in foil with some beef fat that I got from the grocery store. It was good. My son used to hunt but he quit. Around here, some hunters hunt with dogs. They let the dogs out at one area and the dogs chase the deer through the woods to where the hunters wait. To me, that is worse than a still kill. Plus, a deer that is chased has a bad taste. It gets some kind of hormones stirred up in their blood.

    But I still wish somebody had shot that one that ran out in front of my car a couple of weeks ago and did almost $4000 worth of damage.
     
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  3. Bill Boggs

    Bill Boggs Very Well-Known Member
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    Me, too. That was tough luck.
     
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