Sunday Market Called Tiangge

Discussion in 'Shopping & Sales' started by Corie Henson, Aug 27, 2015.

  1. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    Tiangge is actually a sort of trade fair where Sunday sellers come to a place to showcase their wares. Sunday sellers mean they are not the traditional vendors but mostly owners and ordinary people who have the penchant for part time selling. And most of the goods sold, particularly food items, are their creations.

    First the cooked food. Whenever we would pass by that Tiangge, we buy some special dishes that are hard to cook like kare-kare or morcon, beef dishes that are served in restaurants. There are also special snack foods, native snacks and desserts. The variety will confuse with as if you cannot choose which one to buy.

    But that Tiangge is open only on Sunday mornings and it closes by noon time.
     
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  2. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    We have stricter laws about serving any kind of food here in the United States. It used to be that people sold pop and hotdogs, or cookies at their yard sale; but now, if you do not have a health certificate for food you can get in really big trouble for selling it.
    Churches used to have bake sales, and you could buy the most wonderful home-made pies, cakes, and breads there.
    I have not seen one of those in many years, but they may allow people to do it if they give the food away and then take a donation for the church.

    On weekends, we have what is called a Flea Market, which is most any kind of craft, or whatever the person wants to sell. This would probably be the closest that we come to your Sunday market.
     
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  3. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    I understand that part about the food, @Yvonne Smith. There was a sad incident here that poisoned more than 300 pupils of a public school when an NGO (a civic-oriented group) held a feeding program. The food served was contaminated with something toxic - not defined even after the investigations were finalized although some pupils said that the rice cake was already moldy in some parts. So fungus was the suspect as per the testimony of the pupils.

    During the Christmas season, that starts in the first week of December, flea markets would sprout almost everywhere. Mostly composed of stalls selling cheap clothing and accessories, a big part of the market are food stalls catering to promenaders with their finger foods.
     
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