Strictly For The Birds

Discussion in 'Photos & Video' started by Tony Britton, Sep 3, 2016.

  1. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    I'm glad to provide these beautiful birds for you and everyone to enjoy. There's a lovely variety of birds along the Central Coast of California. England has always held an interest to me and perhaps one day I'll make the effort to visit.

    Tony
     
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  2. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    Hi Patsy,

    No, I have yet to see Wagtails. They look gorgeous! I especially love photographing the preening process and I'm happy you like my photos!

    Tony
     
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  3. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    Here's another set I hope you'll enjoy!
    1. Double-crested Cormorant
    [​IMG]
    2. Great Egret
    [​IMG]
    3. Common Merganser
    [​IMG]
    4. Brandt's Cormorant
    [​IMG]
    5. Muscovy Duck
    [​IMG]
    6. Juvenile Black-crowned Night Heron (yawning!)
    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    I was going to choose the 2nd picture (Egret) as my favourite there, but they are all so good :)
     
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  5. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    Thanks! I was especially lucky with the last shot of the yawning heron. I usually have to wait for quite a long time to catch a yawning shot but in this case I waited no more that two minutes and there you have it!

    The transformation of this juvenile Black-crowned Night Heron into adult form is nothing short of astonishing. Below is an example. It's still difficult for me to believe they're the same bird!

    1. Juvenile form (gorgeous orange iris and hints of subtle yellow in the bill)
    [​IMG]
    2. Intermediate form (gradual yet dramatic transformation of plumage and a subtle hint of an orange iris remaining as it gradually goes red)
    [​IMG]
    3. Adult form (transformation of plumage complete with black bill and stunning red iris)
    [​IMG]
    Nature is truly grand!

    Tony
     
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  6. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    Amazing !
     
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  7. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    It really is!

    Tony
     
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  8. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Your photos are amazing, Tony! I honestly don't think I've ever seen better ones. You must also be very patient to get a good shot.
     
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  9. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    You're incredibly kind, Chrissy! Patience certainly factors into getting a good shot. That and being ready when the opportunity finally presents itself. It's very relaxing to be around these birds and this can sometimes result in a slow reaction time on my part!

    Plus, the large birds I generally photograph hold positions for several minutes without the slightest amount of movement. Then suddenly, some dramatic position change like the two yawning herons I've posted here, and you'd better be prepared! To paraphrase the great Louis Pasteur, "chance favors only the prepared photographer!":)

    Tony
     
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  10. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    I've included a few of my favorite black & white conversions. I hope you enjoy this set!

    Tony

    1. Snowy Egret
    [​IMG]
    2. Double-crested Cormorant
    [​IMG]
    3. Great Egret
    [​IMG]
    4. Brown Pelican
    [​IMG]
    5. Snowy Egret
    [​IMG]
    6. Double-crested Cormorant
    [​IMG]
     
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  11. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Love the Black and white, that's always been a favorite of mine. Not black and white as in old photos which are really grey but really black and really white.

    A small amt of red in those photos is a nice touch too.

    My favorite is number 3....reminds me of an angel. :)
     
    #36
  12. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    Thanks for looking and commenting, Chrissy!

    Tony
     
    #37
  13. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    Here's few of my favorite CAPTIVE bird photos. Since there's really no great technical challenge in this situation the only thing on can do is to hopefully make the subjects appear, well, less captive!

    1. American Flamingo
    [​IMG]
    2. Himalayan Monal
    [​IMG]
    3. Harris's Hawk
    [​IMG]
    4. Great Horned Owl
    [​IMG]
    5. Blue & Yellow Macaw
    [​IMG]
    6. Blue-bellied Roller
    [​IMG]
    7. East African Crowned Crane
    [​IMG]
     
    #38
  14. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    Back to the wild!

    1. Snowy Egret
    [​IMG]
    2. Double-crested Cormorant
    [​IMG]
    3. Juvenile Black-crowned Night Heron
    [​IMG]
    4. Brandt's Cormorant
    [​IMG]
    5. Green Heron
    [​IMG]
    6. Double-crested Cormorant
    [​IMG]
    7. Great Egret
    [​IMG]
    8. Rock Pigeon
    [​IMG]
     
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  15. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    I'm running out of adjectives to describe your photos. Love number 6, he looks a little crazy. :)


    Also the owl in the first set. Like how he blends in with the background.

    How many photos have you taken since you've started?
     
    #40
  16. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    Some stunners there Tony - I wonder if birds feel the heat as we do - I would feel it more, covered in feathers ..........
    Well that's a pretty obvious statement from me ..............:rolleyes::p
     
    #41
  17. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    Thanks, Chrissy

    Number 6 is the best example of why they named this bird the "Double-crested Cormorant!" The name cormorant means "sea raven."

    The owl is one of my favorites. It was hot the day I took this photo and the handlers were lightly spraying it with a water hose to cool it off. It ruffled its feathers and filled the camera frame with its gorgeous image. This photo has not been cropped! I was so pleased that I was ready to capture this moment.

    I didn't take the volume of photographs in 2005 as I do today. Currently, I average around 500-1000 shots per day, approximately 3-5 days a week. This is partly due to the fact that I use the "continuous shooting" feature averaging about 3-6 shots per "burst." Also, it's partly due to the fact that I enjoy the process of taking the picture and the interaction between myself and my camera.

    One can take thousands of photos, as I have, and never stop practicing and experimenting with camera settings and control of available light. The environment and subjects are dynamic and therefore, no two shots are exactly the same. Like that old saying goes "you cannot step twice into the same river." Or come to think of it, even once!:)

    Tony
     
    #42
    Last edited: Sep 5, 2016
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  18. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    Thanks very much, Patsy. They certainly do.There's a variety of ways to cool off that are unique to the species. The manner that I'm most familiar with is the way herons, for example, use a "gular fluttering" method. Gular means "pertaining to the throat." The heron will open its mouth and “flutter” its neck muscles, promoting heat loss. It's similar to a dog with open mouth panting. It's fascinating to watch!

    Tony
     
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  19. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Your love of photography definitely shows in your work, Tony! I wish I had such passion ....and talent.
     
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  20. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    @Tony Britton - watching all the programmes I do, that has 'never' been explained
    Seen them do these things many times. My favourite displays are the dances they do and the making of
    nests. Also the homes some of the males provide, they sure are a sight to behold :)
     
    #45
  21. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    Thank you very much, Chrissy!

    Tony
     
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  22. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    Yes, their behaviors are endlessly fascinating and entertaining. A favorite behavior pattern of one of our local birds is that of the American Bittern. Here's three typical positions:

    1. At rest. Neck relaxed, bill pointed downward.
    [​IMG]
    2. Hunting. Bill pointed slightly upward.
    [​IMG]
    3. Alarmed. Neck extended, bill pointed skyward.
    [​IMG]

    Now, here's the amazing thing about their alarmed position. They're often found among wetlands that have an abundance of reeds. If they believe they've been noticed by a potential predator they will not only extend their neck but should a breeze pass over the reeds while they're in this position they will sway in time with the movement of the reeds as a further strategy to go unnoticed!!!!!

    Tony
     
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  23. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    You really know your birds, guess you have to in order to get good photos.
     
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  24. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    @Tony Britton - That's right - seen them do such amazing things, so clever they are and no mistake :)
     
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  25. Tony Britton

    Tony Britton Member
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    I hope you enjoy these!

    1. Snowy Egret
    [​IMG]
    2. Great Blue Heron
    [​IMG]
    3. Double-crested Cormorant
    [​IMG]
    4. Snowy Egret
    [​IMG]
    5. Western Gull
    [​IMG]
    6. Brown Pelican
    [​IMG]
    7. Double-crested Cormorant
    [​IMG]
    8. Allen's Hummingbird
    [​IMG]
     
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