Senior Citizens In Singapore

Discussion in 'Senior Employment' started by Corie Henson, Dec 3, 2015.

  1. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2015
    Messages:
    2,906
    Likes Received:
    2,419
    As you well know, I was in Singapore last weekend, that's my 3rd time to be there. It is noticeable that in fast food centers and even in the airport, old people are doing the dirty work. The young busboys who get the food trays and wipe the table are now replaced by old men and women. Even the porters in the airport are aged people.

    According to a taxi driver, who sounded intellectual, Singapore doesn't want to take care of the old people so they give them jobs in order for them to take care of themselves. Unlike in some countries where the retirees have nothing to do, the senior citizens there are encouraged to be productive.
     
    #1
    Rachel Rodarte likes this.
  2. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    1,403
    Likes Received:
    2,759
    https://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/progdesc/ssptw/2010-2011/asia/singapore.html

    It is a shame really, people who work all of their younger lives just to HAVE to work all of their older lives.

    I included a link to a rather lengthy and somewhat difficult breakdown of the social security program in Singapore.
    It seems, that one can retire at the age of 55 and get a bulk payment of UP TO S$128.000.00 which is totally dependent on how much is put into the Singapore stock account. It's interesting to find that one can actually aquire land during his / her younger life and then get to give it up to the government in order to get more cash to live on.
    (I do hope I have read the breakdown properly)

    Now to get real, in the U.S. a woman who has served as a mother and house wife all of her younger life can only garner about $350.00 a month from Social Security. That means that she had best find something to do after the kids are out of the house in order to improve her Social Security payments and think about it, she can't get a dime until she is 67 years old. (new retirement age)

    It sounds like the U.S., on some levels, forces our seniors to work after they have spent most of their lives doing what?.........working. Walmart Greeter anyone?

    Just as a side note: It was reported a couple of weeks ago that the U.S. possession of Puerto Rico has a new gig going on. The citizens of Puerto Rico can claim a disability because they can say that because they do not speak English they cannot get a job. (no matter the age)

    The first language of Puerto Rico is Spanish, but the U.S. first language is English so they claim the language barrier to be a disability even though nearly all of the jobs in PR are Spanish speaking jobs.
     
    #2
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2015
  3. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2015
    Messages:
    15,005
    Likes Received:
    13,751
    True about the stay at home mom's social security, Bobby. I don't think I worked more than 2 years total my married life.

    At age 62 I was eligible for a portion of my my late husband's soc sec., or widows benefits as they are called.

    I get about $1,400 a month in widows benefits.
     
    #3
  4. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2015
    Messages:
    2,906
    Likes Received:
    2,419
    Gee, what kind of social security provision is that for Puerto Rico residents? Being considered disabled because they cannot speak English. Oh my, that's another cause for discrimination although I'm sure the Puerto Ricans would be happy being discriminated that way. When my father-in-law was here, he was receiving a pension that is slightly below $1,000 and over here that's big money already. Unfortunately he went back to the US to retire permanently because medicines and hospitalization are free, according to him.
     
    #4
  5. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    1,403
    Likes Received:
    2,759
    The "after note" concerning Puerto Rico and the citizens' ability to collect disability because a language barrier preventing them from getting employment is different than Social Security.

    Like all U.S. Territories, if a Puerto Rican pays into Social Security they will benefit from it at retirement age.
     
    #5
    Corie Henson likes this.
  6. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2015
    Messages:
    2,906
    Likes Received:
    2,419
    Truly America is very generous with their people. My husband has just applied for social security pension, being quailified for his age of 60 (he turned 61 last week) and for working more than 10 years with social security system contributions. Hopefuly he would receive his monthly before Christmas. The amount is 3,999 pesos a month, that is less than $100. That amount can handle the day to day food expenses of 1 person. But how about if the pensioner is renting? He has no choice but to live with a relative or a friend otherwise he would be a hobo.
     
    #6

Share This Page