Selling Your Dvds

Discussion in 'Senior Employment' started by Diane Lane, Sep 23, 2016.

  1. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    I've heard back from 2 of the companies I sold books/DVDs/CDs to. I'm very impressed with one of them, the one I sold just my books to, and they have a sister site that buys DVDs, so I wanted to share it. I haven't heard back from one yet, and I don't even think they've received the box yet, so I won't address that company.

    The company I am impressed with is www.SellBackYourBook.com and their sister site for buying/selling DVDs is http://www.selldvdsonline.com./ I have additional DVDs to sell, and I plan to start scanning the UPC codes later. They have an app, which is what I'll use to scan/list the items for sale, assuming they'll be interested in any of them. They also purchase CDs and video games.

    I know some here have those things and would probably like to make a bit of money while downsizing, so I wanted to share. I also used a site called decluttr, but I wasn't at all happy with my experience with them, so obviously I won't recommend using them.

    Here is a link to the FAQ at SellDVDsOnline. Note that they do not purchase new, unopened DVDs. If you decide to use them, please read the information ahead of time. I will open any sealed DVDS before shipping, just to increase the chances of a payment.

    Although I could probably make a little money selling some of the DVDs individually, it's doubtful that they would all sell, and listing each one individually, taking pictures, pulling together a synopsis, etc., and paying listing and/or final value fees, is a waste of time, money and energy in my opinion, other than perhaps for a select few, especially the more in demand boxed sets, so I prefer to go this route for the majority of the DVDS.
     
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  2. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    I am surprised that old DVDs can be sold. And I wonder what the buyer would do with that old DVD. I'm not being suspicious but are they up to something? Digital piracy is a common thing here that pirates can produce a clone of original DVD. An original costs 250 pesos at least but a pirated copy costs only 25 pesos, that's clearly just 10% of the original price. What I'm pointing at is if the online buyer of old DVD would buy a piece for more than 25 pesos then I can get so many pirated copies and deluge them. Just thinking aloud.
     
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  3. Arlene Richards

    Arlene Richards Very Well-Known Member
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  4. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    Thanks @Arlene Richards, I'm glad you found it helpful. I having heard back from the 3rd company yet. I think they will probably be a stand up firm, and hopefully I'll get what they promised. The box I packed up yesterday will be picked up today by USPS, and the companies pay the shipping, which is great.

    @Corie Henson There is still a market for DVDs, books and CDs, apparently. I occasionally will still buy one, because I like to have something tangible, and since my TV/Internet aren't always reliable, it's nice to have something to watch. I'm not sure it would be worthwhile to buy to mass produce, although perhaps I'm wrong and there's a market for that, particularly overseas.
     
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  5. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    I not really a fanatic of DVD but I used to buy once in a while. In fact, we have some unopened movie DVDs here that were not used due to lack of time. When we bought our flat tv 2 years ago, my husband was searching for the slot of CD (and DVD) at the side because we have seen the other new tv using DVD. When we asked the store attendant, he said that new tv models do not use DVDs anymore and they have the USB slot instead. So if we have a DVD then we need to transfer it to a USB in order to play it on our new tv. It seems that technology is making CD and DVD obsolete.
     
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  6. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    @Corie Henson I guess in the past y'all had a TV/DVD combination? Those are actually not that common over here, although many years back, I did have a TV/VCR combination that I absolutely loved. DVD players and blu-ray players are inexpensive enough these days that it's easy to pick one up and just hook it into the television set. I have a DVD player up here, but it's an older one, and I'm not even sure I could connect it without some sort of converter. I have an older model of blu-ray player downstairs, and I do occasionally (especially when the cable was on the fritz) watch DVDs or blu-rays on it, but I mainly use it for streaming content.
     
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  7. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    Let me just add this note. I am wondering why we have no blu-ray players and even burners in computers. I'm sure there are but maybe rare enough so I do not know. Unlike the DVD which is a ubiquitous object in most markets, the blu-ray is a rara avis. Even with the computers, I still have to see a blu-ray burner (or whatever you call it). All computers are equipped with a CD/DVD burner, that's a standard. I wonder why blu-ray is discriminated here. From what I had read, blu-ray has a better resolution than the DVD.

    @Diane Lane, when the models of tv came out with a DVD player, our old tv which was attached to a separate DVD player was still working. And as I had said, when we bought this new flat tv, it is with a USB socket only and no more slot for the DVD.
     
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  8. Krissttina Isobe

    Krissttina Isobe Very Well-Known Member
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    Very good to know when you'd like to sell your stuff...I couldn't find any buyer for VHS and donated and threw ours out that we recorded at home. Thanks for the information.
     
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  9. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    @Corie Henson Do your televisions have HDMI slots/sockets? Those are standard here, and are what is used to connect most components, whether blu-ray players, Rolu players, etc. It doesn't seem the blu-rays really caught on, and they seem to be in the process of phasing them out. Many younger people prefer digital products that are stored in 'the cloud', but I still like to have a tangible item when I pay for something. I need to replace my glasses at some point, and these ones are so bad that I don't mind viewing shows in standard definition, so I'm o.k. with DVDs, rather than blu-rays. I do have a few blu-rays, but the cost was always so much higher than typical DVDs, that I would just purchase the DVDs.

    I'm hoping to hear back today as to whether that 3rd company will pay what they had initially quoted me. The box was received Friday or Saturday, and it hopefully won't take them that long to go through them. I still have some more here that I plan to keep, as well as others that I want to scan, to see what they'll pay for them. The capped the shipments off at 50 items, so I stopped there, since I was tired.
     
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