School Choice

Discussion in 'Education & Learning' started by Janice Martin, Jan 29, 2017.

  1. Janice Martin

    Janice Martin Well-Known Member
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    The more I read/learn about this, the madder I get. Wasn't really sure what to make of it when i first started hearing about it years ago.

    When I was in HS, I attended an out-of-district school; reason: the bullying in my first school was so extreme that I dropped out. However, attending a different school meant my father paid tuition (for which I am still grateful); he also provided transportation in the mornings before he went to work, and I caught rides home in the evenings with various neighbors who worked near my school.
    Second, my best friend attended parochial school; similar situation- her parents were responsible for the details. And when one of my brothers' friends had to go to classes in a different school because his didn't offer the classes he needed, the parents were also responsible for transportation and tuition.

    I do not believe it is right that 'school choice' now means we taxpayers are expected to foot the bill when parents object to their local schools. I've seen in most cases it's a matter of not wanting their kids to attend public school, and preferring to enroll them in private (usually religious) schools instead. We are already paying taxes to support local, public schools- even if we no longer have kids in school; and covering other people's 'choices' is flat-out wrong.
     
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  2. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Janice Martin
    If I understand correctly (good 50/50 chance) so maybe not, my belief is that parents ought to be able to choose which school, no matter where it is located, their kids attend. Beyond doubt, such ability is already in place for the well-positioned monetarily. Within reason, though, many kids I knew in my youth attended Parochial as well as private schools before high school, and transferred to my public HS for whatever reason. IMO, the Parochial-trained kids lacked in Math and Science skills. Just sayin'.
    Frank
     
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  3. Janice Martin

    Janice Martin Well-Known Member
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    In general, choosing it isn't the issue- it's expecting someone else (taxes) to pay for it.
     
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  4. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    I thought private and catholic schools are paid for by the parents. My daughter is thinking of sending my 13 yr old grandson to the Catholic High School.

    Although his older brother will be graduating from the public high school in May, she wasn't happy with the school.

    The cost of the Catholic school is as much as some university tuitions.
     
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  5. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    I think the idea is that the public schools would have an incentive to do a better job if they were subjected to competition, since the amount of money they get is tied to the number of students they have. Maybe something would have been done about the bullying if parents were pulling their kids from the school because of it. There is also the idea that it doesn't seem fair for parents to have pay to support both the public school and the one they are sending their children to. My concern (not really an objection) with tuition waivers or other school choice measures is a worry that, since they are receiving tax money, they will be subject to the same regulations as public schools, thereby removing the very things that set them apart. There are no perfect solutions, I fear.
     
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