Rhubarb

Discussion in 'Crops & Gardens' started by Ken Anderson, Apr 9, 2016.

  1. Ruby Begonia

    Ruby Begonia Very Well-Known Member
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    The most common pie in my area is strawberry rhubarb pie. Rhubarb does have a flavor, if you can drill down past the sour that is good but can't describe.
     
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  2. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    We had strawberry rhubarb pie last night, from the bakery. Since she has never made, the question I always pose to my wife is this. Is strawberry rhubarb pie made from strawberries and rhubarb or is it made from strawberry rhubarb, which is a specific variety of rhubarb? My mother, I think, would often mix strawberries and rhubarb into a pie, and I believe we only had one variety of rhubarb, and I don't know if anyone really knew what that was, but there is a variety of rhubarb known as strawberry rhubarb. In the pie we got from the bakery, I couldn't see anything that looked like strawberries in it, as it all looked like rhubarb to me, but the recipes I have seen call for strawberries and rhubarb.
     
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  3. Kate Ellery

    Kate Ellery Veteran Member
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    #28
  4. Ruby Begonia

    Ruby Begonia Very Well-Known Member
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    The pie I know has both chunks of rhubarb and real strawberries in it. The bakery is obviously as low quality as is the one in my town. Who know what they put in it? Since it's not strawberry season yet, maybe they used jam or some other cheat. If it tasted good to you though, who cares.
     
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  5. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    The part of poke salat that is eaten is the leaves, and often the stems, and it is picked when it is small. I have never eaten any myself, but when I lived in Missouri, we had neighbors who knew about eating it. Since I was new there, they were explaing to me that it was poisonous, berries and all. However, she said that if you cut it when it is short and tender, then you boil it, changing the water several times to leach out the poisons, that it was an edible green.
    Since there are plenty of edible greens that aren't likely to kill you if you don't cook it correctly, it never made any sense to me to eat one that just might kill me.
    We have some growing in our yard here, and in the lot behind us. I usually chop them down with the weedeater when they are small, although (for a weed) they are not bad looking.

    http://www.aihd.ku.edu/recipes/poke_salad.html
     
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  6. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
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    No,no Kate, the berries are the most poisonous part. People eat the young leaves. They boil them in water, drain the water to remove the poison then boil them again. Birds love the berries they are not toxic to the birds.
     
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  7. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
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    That sounds like a waste of good strawberrys.
     
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  8. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    Strawberry and rhubarb just seem to be made for each other, and even though plain rhubarb pie is delicious, I do prefer the strawberry rhubarb pie.
    The two flavors just seem to enhance each other.
    I also used to make strawberry rhubarb jam, and that might be my most favorite jam ever.
    There is an easy freezer jam recipe that worked for us, because I didn't make large quantities, just a jar or two now and then because we don't eat much toast and jam.

    To make the freezer jam, you just chop up the rhubarb, and cook it with the strawberries and some sugar/sweetener to taste.
    Then you mix in a large package of strawberry jello, and put it in jars to cool.
    It will keep quite a while in the refrigerator, or you can put it in the plastic freezer containers and freeze it.
    If you like jam, and don't want to actually can it, then this is quick, easy, and delicious.
    Actually, you don't even need strawberries to make this as long as you are using the strawberry jello. There are a multitude of recipes for making this jam online, with different variations.
     
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  9. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    It looks like at least one of the rhubarbs that I planted last year made it through the winter, as it is showing some color. I don't know about the others yet.
     
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  10. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    [​IMG]
    Without close examination, it doesn't look like much is going on in the rhubarb patch.

    [​IMG]
    But, there are a couple of leaves coming up from this one, which is one I planted last year.

    [​IMG]
    This is one that I planted this year.

    [​IMG]
    This one is from last year too.

    [​IMG]
    There's one with a leaf, and another, behind and to the right of it, that doesn't have anything going on yet. The one with the leaf is from last year, the other one is new.
    [​IMG]
    Looking closer, it looks like one is leafing out between two root stocks that don't have anything going on yet.
     
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  11. Carol Cook

    Carol Cook Active Member
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    I have a large patch of rhubarb. Most of it just goes to seed.. I may bake a strawberry rhubarb pie or a rhubarb oatmeal crisp one a year of so.. but I'm not a huge sweet eater.. and my baking skills leave a lot to be desired.
     
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  12. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    My rhubarb actually made it through the winter, poked up one itty-bitty leaf, and then just disappeared. I have tried it at several different locations around the house, trying to find a spot that is cool enough in the heat of summer, and yet gets enough sunlight to grow.
    Actually, the best luck I had with rhubarb was when I had it growing in a container, and I brought it in and out of the house, so it got morning sun, and was inside in the heat of summer.
    I might have to try that again.
    Your rhubarb is looking great, @Ken Anderson, and I am envious !
     
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  13. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    I prefer rhubarb pie with much less sugar than most people use, and it's good with strawberries as well.

    Rhubarb usually does very well once a patch of it is established but getting it to that point seems to be a problem.
     
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  14. Chris Ladewig

    Chris Ladewig Well-Known Member
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    Try putting a little acid type furtilizer on it. Or you could dig in used coffee grounds or use a pine needle mulch
     
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    Last edited: May 1, 2016
  15. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    Coffee grounds I've used. I don't want to add fertilizer because they are too close to the lingonberries and I don't want any of it to leach into the lingonberry patch, since fertilizer is apt to kill lingonberries.
     
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  16. K E Gordon

    K E Gordon Very Well-Known Member
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    I haven't had rhubarb outside perhaps a store bought pie for many years. My mother either grew it or it grew wild outside our house when I was a little kid. That was in NW Pennsylvania though where I think the weather was more suited to it. I am not sure if it grows here in Virginia, if it does, it is likely in the mountains where it is cool a good bit of the time. They do some maple sugaring there, which I think is the most Southern location it is done.
     
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  17. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    I bought a couple more 3-packs of rhubarb because they were on clearance from the Tractor Supply Company today. I know the instructions say to plant them three feet apart but the ones that I planted three feet apart last year never accomplished anything. They would sprout leaves, and then the leaves and stem would wither. Three feet seems a bit far, considering that the ones we had at our house growing up were all clumped together and they did great. So I planted these a little closer together, to fit them in.
     
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  18. Chris Ladewig

    Chris Ladewig Well-Known Member
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    I hope they do well for you. I've tried a couple time and not had them turn out. I think Tn is the wrong climate for them.
     
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  19. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    Tennessee might be a little warm for rhubarb. I think they do better in colder climates. They should do well in Maine because the climate here is much the same as in the UP of Michigan, and I know they do well there. It seems that it's hard to get a patch of rhubarb started but that they will pretty much take care of themselves once they're established.
     
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  20. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    All of my rhubarb is growing now. Hopefully, these will carry over the winter, so that I won't have to plant new stuff in the spring.

    [​IMG]
     
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  21. K E Gordon

    K E Gordon Very Well-Known Member
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    I saw rhubarb in a store I was in last week, I was kind of surprised, because you don't see it that often. I think it was Kroger. I have never cooked with it. I forgot when I was at Penn State, it was served in little dishes with lots of sugar as a dessert. It wasn't bad. I have no great hankering for rhubarb though. I wouldn't turn down a strawberry rhubarb pie though. I never heard of cherry rhubarb, I guess that combination isn't used much.
     
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  22. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    The rhubarb seems to be doing pretty well, if only it will survive the winter.

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
     
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  23. Chris Ladewig

    Chris Ladewig Well-Known Member
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    Rhubarb is looking good, you may have to transplant some if they all come back, they will be a little to close.
     
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  24. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    Perhaps. I've had trouble with them surviving the winters. I think I'll try covering the bed with mulch before the snow this year. Being along the driveway, snow is packed pretty tightly during the winter, and that might reduce the problem.
     
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  25. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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