Poison Ivy Time Again

Discussion in 'Crops & Gardens' started by Yvonne Smith, Apr 26, 2017.

  1. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    The other day, I took the little weedeater out and got rid of a lot of the poison ivy that was coming up along the fence, and today, I weedeatered the other side of the fence; so I think that I got most of it cut back.
    It isn't dead, and I will have to keep working at it as it grows back again; but at least i can now work in the flower beds along that area and not worry so much about it.
    A worse place is right in the front yard, where I have a little flower bed beneath one of the trees. There is poison ivy growing in there and it was mixed with some of the other wild vines and my flowers that also come up all over in the spring.
    The Virginia Creeper is the main other vine we have, and one that has pretty heart-shaped leaves and sharp thorns. That one I also have to cut and not just pull out since the thorns are hard to miss and I am not usually wearing my gardening gloves (shame on me !).
    I am pretty sure that I got some poison ivy on my hands today, and they are burning. I came in and washed them good with soap and hot water to get the oil from the poison ivy off, and next I will put coconut oil cream on my hands, which is supposed to stop the itching and help the skin to heal.
    I looked it up to see if coconut oil helps, and apparently, I was doing the right thing. Next time, I will try to remember to wear the gardening gloves, and then I can just yank out the poison ivy vine as long as I am careful.

    http://www.truthin7minutes.com/treat-poison-ivy/
     
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  2. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Ive never come across poison ivy in all my years in the US.

    Did go through some poison oak when in Hungary....I was drunk, lol.
     
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  3. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    That stuff has long roots, and a tendency to pop up somewhere else. While I was ridding my yard of it, I found that - as I was as a child - I still don't react to poison ivy.
     
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  4. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Maybe I don't either then and its not that I've never been around it or touched it.
     
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  5. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    I think it's about ten percent of the population that doesn't. I told the story here somewhere, but my older brother tricked me into walking into a patch of poison ivy once and then laughed at me after telling me what it was. Figuring I'd be hurting anyhow, I pulled some of it up and rubbed it on his back. He was wearing the calamine lotion while I had no problem at all.
     
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  6. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    I do not react to it as bad as some people do; which is why I can pull it out if I am careful, and also don't get too much of it on me. I try not to touch the leaves, and if I know I am going to be working in it, I do usually wear my gardening gloves.
    We also have Virginia Creeper, which looks very similar, except it has smaller, 5-pointed leaves, and the poison ivy has a 3-pointed leaf that is a brighter green.
    The first experience I had with it was back when I lived in Missouri.
    Robin and I were traveling to Kansas City where my son lived at that time, for the Fourth of July weekend, and we passed some kittens on the side of the road.
    They were just little ones, and so we stopped to try and rescue them.
    The kittens were afraid of us, and we had to follow them around through the weeds and finally caught the two which we saw.
    Apparently, there was some kind of either poison ivy or poison oak, or something similar, because by the time we got to KC we were both itching. However, we thought it was from the mosquitoes, which were also all over.
    By the time we had gotten back home, we were both covered in red blotches, and itched all over because we had both spread it on our arms and legs.
    The next week was terrible, and I thought it would never go away; but it did finally heal up. Since we didn't know that we were in the poison ivy, we didn't even know what it looked like to be able to watch out for it again, and I didn't learn that until we moved here, and the neighbor told me what it was.
    Here is a picture of what it looks like and how to identify poison ivy.

    http://m.wikihow.com/Identify-Poison-Ivy
     
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