Planning a Pergola Installation

Discussion in 'Home Improvement' started by Jenn Windey, Feb 28, 2015.

  1. Jenn Windey

    Jenn Windey Active Member
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    Winter was pretty cruel in this neck of the woods this year. Early on in the season the first storm was a real storm, I was in that area that got the seven feet of snow. The result is the snow took down a small eave that was at the back door. I decided that I was not going to replace this because I always thought a pergola would be nice there. I have been planning on what I would like to do and I have to say I am pretty excited because I actually saw some pergolas on display at Lowe's yesterday.

    This project will require me to finally address a garden bed I left go and the substrate under where the pergola will be. I will need to find a floor for the 10'x10' structure. I have a crazy idea, I want to level the dirt and do a landscape tarp, then cover that with stone or sand. Then when level I plan to take pallets and affix roofing board over the tops of the pallets. This comes in 4x8 sheets. Before I screw it down I want to staple indoor-outdoor carpet so I have a low deck thats carpeted. I am thinking water drains through this type of carpet right? Then the pergola itself has a canopy thats retractable. Some chairs and a table and plants and there you have it!

    Anyone ever did a pergola or a deck? any ideas or comments very much appreciated since this is my first go at something like this. Is the pallet idea a bad idea?

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  2. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
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    Pallets are indeed a good idea, provided that they are the same size. If they aren't the same depth, be ready to do a little digging. If the outside dimensions are askew from one pallet to the next then you might have a few headache pills close at hand.
    Other than that, they're an easy solution for a strong, near ground level base. It sounds like you have a plan, and pergolas are relatively easy to build. A skill saw, drill bits, screw gun, speed square, a pencil and ruler. Not much else to it for tools. Have fun!!
     
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  3. Jenn Windey

    Jenn Windey Active Member
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    A saw hahahah that's pretty funny Bobby! Actually the one I chose is metal and only requires a small Allen wrench that will no doubt come with the parts. I don't usually get to much into cutting and stuff like that. The one I looked at is by a company called Hampton Bay. I have purchased items from that company before, I got a ceiling fan and some light fixtures. I was actually quite pleased that they were rather easy to assemble. This one is probably just bolted together similar to the way my sons swing set was. I got that put together in a few hours so I feel confident I can handle a big square. Seriously the hardest part will be leveling the substrate, I have already had some practice on that last year as I did a raised garden bed.

    Luckily there are a few manufacturing companies that are near my area so I am confident that I will find some of the same size pallets. I wouldn't mind having a better selection of tools, I have managed some thru the years but over all they are not that impressive. I do have an electric large stapler that I bought when I put insulation in so that will come in handy when I am ready to nail the carpet down. Do you think that will drain well? It is the indoor outdoor kind? Or do you think the recycled rubberized patio mats would be better?
     
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  4. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
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    Hey again! Okay. I hope I am right about what you're doing. Roofing board? I've sheeted a lot of roofs before and most roofs have 5/8ths plywood as "roofing board." The other one that I like is what I am doing for my porch. I am making tongue and groove planks from 11/16" x 6" x 8' fence material. It's beautiful stuff when it's planed and stained. I digress........
    If you are using plywood and indoor/outdoor turfing or carpet you will have to give the whole setup some drainage by giving everything a slight pitch and even then I would still drill a bunch of holes in the plywood. On the other hand, the rubber matting, if it doesn't have holes in it, can be put down and water will probably drain well enough so as not to have to go to so much other trouble as the carpet stuff will be. After a rain, with the rubber matting, all you might have to do is sweep off some excess water. With the carpet / turf you do run a risk of mold because it will be hard for the plywood to dry completely. No matter what you use, I would still paint the roofing material with a anti-mold and fungus paint like "Kilz." If even a small bit, I hope I have been of some assistance. God Bless. Have a good summer!!
     
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