Outrageous Claims Companies Make In Ads

Discussion in 'Shopping & Sales' started by Sheldon Scott, Oct 13, 2015.

  1. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
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    Why do companies make such outrageous claims to try and sell their product? To me they are a turnoff and the reason I won't buy their products. Two recent ads I've seen come to mind.

    Omaha Steaks is offering a package of food for $49.95. Checking what I know of prices they seem quite a bit higher than buying from the store but not out of line if the quality is good and it is delivered to you house.

    The turnoff: In the ad Omaha Steaks says the $49.95 package is worth over $200 and I would be saving more than $150 if I buy their product. Get real Omaha, you lost me as a customer.

    The other outrageous claim come from a vacuum sealing product called Food Saver. They claim the average family wastes $2700 worth of food per year and their product will save a family that amount.

    Get real Food Saver. I serious doubt we waste $27 worth of food per year and I can't imagine even a large family wasting more than $200 or $300 worth of food. Another product I won' buy.
     
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  2. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    Most ads on TV are not truthful. They use paid actors to portray real people. If you mute the sound, and watch their body language, you can tell. In general, everyone on TV is selling something. In most cases, they are selling themselves!
     
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  3. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    Just the other day, I chanced upon this ezshopping on tv. There was this product called Gloxi (not sure with the spelling) that it increases the height of a person regardless of age. We all know that humans normally stop growing vertically after age 21 except in some unusual cases. Now that advertisement of that product comes with testimonials. One was a girl who used to be 4'11" in height and after a few weeks of taking that liquid, she was measured at 5'5". That's clearly 6 inches. Another is a middle aged guy standing at 4'9" and after some weeks now stands at 5'7". Another is a teenager at 5 feet before taking Gloxi, he grew to 5 feet 11 inches. Isn't that outrageously incredible?
     
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  4. Krissttina Isobe

    Krissttina Isobe Very Well-Known Member
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    :oops:I feel that way about some hair product that's being advertised like Wen. I found a consumer site consumeraffairs.com that has a lot of complaints about Wen hair products. Keranique is another hair product that don't seem to work. Here is a link to the site about Keranique. The advertisements say what you'd like to happen for hair growth and seems to be the perfect solution for you. The advertisement doesn't say you'll be billed continuously for the product either it said free trail for Keranique, yet people got billed month after month for a Keranique that just don't work. Awful preying on people's problems with products that don't work!
     
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  5. Ike Willis

    Ike Willis Very Well-Known Member
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    There's a lot of fraud in advertising. Always has been. I used to collect old magazines and catalogs from the 1920's and before. Ads would show bottles of compounds to cure every affliction known to man. And, there were ads that showed you what cigarettes more doctors smoke. An old ad for Packard automobiles had the best advice. It advised us to "ask the man who owns one".
     
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  6. Cody Fousnaugh

    Cody Fousnaugh Very Well-Known Member
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    Liberty Mutual Car Insurance is the same way in their ads. The ads say that a customer will get the entire amount they paid for their vehicle back if they have an accident. But, in the fine print, it's states two States, one Wyoming, that they don't do this for. The ads say other things also, that the fine print at the bottom says "depending on what a person is signed up for."

    Now, on the flip side of this, the ad for the Otter case for the iPhone 6 says the case is tough and can withstand different things. I have that case for my 6 and the thing is definitely TOUGH!!
     
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  7. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    Nothing ever changes - Anthony Trollope wrote a novel called The Struggles of Brown, Jones and Robinson, which was a satire on advertising and the outlandish claims made. The year: 1862.
     
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