Our Younger Generation Can't Write Anymore!

Discussion in 'Education & Learning' started by Yvonne Smith, Jan 31, 2015.

  1. Avigail David

    Avigail David Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    Messages:
    355
    Likes Received:
    257
    I was amazed at my son's 'achievement' he was telling me about their exams last week. He said that he wrote a 1,000-word persuasive essay. By hand. Yes, with a pen! With his own penmanship. I was more surprised than he was. Actually, the students were prompted to prepare during the semester to do research and study. At exams, they will all have to put them in writing by hand.

    Of course, he did his very best to write neatly and persuasively to achieve good grades. Being granted scholarship this year has been his driving force, thankfully. His previous homeshooling prepared him for that, I guess.

    Penmanship is still, I think, an endeavor among educators in our school system. It's a pity that majority of the schools refuse that privilege of learning the 'art.'
     
    #51
    Diane Lane and Jennifer Graves like this.
  2. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2015
    Messages:
    2,906
    Likes Received:
    2,419
    I agree that most kids now are having a hard time writing in the so called "long hand" style of using pen and paper. The keyboard is getting to be the most common medium of writing. But my concern is not much of the penmanship or handwriting but more of the grammar and spelling. I have seen so many times the improper spelling of YOU'RE which they spelled it as YOUR. Imagine reading this sentence in the social media - I am glad your here now. Another annoying mistake in spelling is that of LOSE versus LOOSE.

    Pardon me for acting as a grammar police. I'm sure you already know that I am in forums to enhance my writing and grammar. That is why I am very observant when it comes to those things. But not really in English only. Even in our language, those kids have bastardized the spelling of so many words. Pardon for the word.
     
    #52
  3. Jennifer Graves

    Jennifer Graves Active Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2015
    Messages:
    415
    Likes Received:
    116
    They really have butchered it. Won't &want, then & than, rather & weather, know & now.... And those are just a few of the examples inhave stored in my "pet peeves" file.
     
    #53
    Diane Lane likes this.
  4. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    7,462
    Likes Received:
    9,818
    A part of the problem is that people are using tiny little devices to communicate with, so they can't be bothered to use apostrophes or much of anything in the way of punctuation and, in time, these becomes the norm.
     
    #54
    Diane Lane likes this.
  5. Molly Fenster

    Molly Fenster New Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2015
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    14
    That is incredible!

    How come that writing skill is becoming an exclusive trait to younger generations? This makes me just sad because in my times everyone had to know how to write, this would not pop into mind. A child that doesnt know how to write.. Where has this world came?
     
    #55
  6. Jennifer Graves

    Jennifer Graves Active Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2015
    Messages:
    415
    Likes Received:
    116
    Soon grammar is going to be considered obsolete. My children were always taught the skills to read and write when they were real young. My daughter was even allied to smack me in the hand if I let my southern accent start to take over, or if I use the word "ain't"
     
    #56
  7. Bill Boggs

    Bill Boggs Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    May 13, 2015
    Messages:
    1,231
    Likes Received:
    1,436
    How long has it been since you received a handwritten letter? I received one the other day on my birthday. It was from a gal out in west Texas my daughter's age. Growing up she spent a lot of time at my place. Both her mother and her father were alcoholics so she spent many nights with my daughter. She has a beautiful hand writing and I wrote a think you note to her in cursive. I really had to think what I was doing because normally I would print. Times change and we do things differently. I suppose a big part of being educated is so we can fit in most anywhere and find adequate employment. I did not get much of an education and I have always regretted not doing so. But then maybe I got all I was smart enough to get. I have four grand kids. Two of them are grown and are doing well in technology fields. The two younger ones are in middle school and high school. I don't know how well they can write or what they are learning. I assume they're doing okay because both are honor students, whatever that means. Both their parents are teachers and again I assume they are tending to their educational needs.
     
    #57
    Diane Lane likes this.
  8. Carlota Clemens

    Carlota Clemens Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2015
    Messages:
    431
    Likes Received:
    306
    If people nowadays feel unwilling to send an email, much less a handwritten letter, which may have several readings that may not only include laziness? to write it down but also lack of interest to do it.

    This is why I will always appreciate a handwritten letter over any other form of communication, because it involves time investing and time is the most precious treasure someone can share with one.

    However while it's comprehensible having the younger generation to writing anymore and being surprised to learn one can do it even in cursive, sounds silly when someone of you age says not being able to do it anymore and point at your cursive writing as "archaic and incomprehensible" pushing you to repeat it in a print way.
     
    #58
    Diane Lane likes this.
  9. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    7,462
    Likes Received:
    9,818
    Digital words have a far shorter lifespan than the printed word. When you think about how much of what we know about history has come from letters and journals that people kept while at war, in political office, or simply living their lives, I worry that the history of the modern world will be the creation of advertising rather than actual history.

    One day, your computer will crash and everything on it will be lost. One day, this forum will be gone. Maybe, I'll die or become seriously ill, or maybe some hacker will succeed at getting in, or perhaps there will be a network crash that I can't recover from. Either way, eventually it will be gone and all of our words will be gone with it. Email messages are ephemera, and one day will will learn that Facebook has been bought out by someone else who won't be continuing it.

    What is the history of tomorrow going to be based on, I wonder?
     
    #59
    Diane Lane and Carlota Clemens like this.
  10. Carlota Clemens

    Carlota Clemens Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2015
    Messages:
    431
    Likes Received:
    306
    This is so true and so often forgotten!

    How many times have happened to us suffering a massive data loss and feeling regret for not having a digital backup or at least a paper written text with the most necessary bits of information what we may be needing then after.

    And remember another fact, one days is not just about a computer crashing, but what is going to happen when for any reason there is no way to connect a computer to a power supply?

    Without electricity or other power source there is no access to whatever could be in a digital medium even if backed up.
     
    #60
    Avigail David and Diane Lane like this.
  11. Helene Lawson

    Helene Lawson Active Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2015
    Messages:
    394
    Likes Received:
    106
    I agree with all of the things you wrote, the younger generation can't write because they play some stupid games and "live" in the virtual world, they go do school and get notes, they were supposed to be taught on how to write, but actually not a lot of them can write reasonable sentences, not even talking about writing different stories, their imagination is just too shallow.
     
    #61
  12. Joyce Mcgregor

    Joyce Mcgregor Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    120
    Likes Received:
    210
    I was so surprised when I found out that my 8yr old grandson was not learning cursive in school. Cursive can be so beautiful. In fact, handwritting is not taught at all and his printing is atrocious. I try working with him on it so it will be legible, but get so frustrated i finally give up. But then, a couple of days later I work with him some more. His numbers are hard to read too. I talked to his teacher about his handwritting when school started this year and she did say she planned on working with the kids some because she had noticed that most had the sloppiest penmanship she had seen in several years.
     
    #62
    Diane Lane and Yvonne Smith like this.
  13. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2015
    Messages:
    2,906
    Likes Received:
    2,419
    I'm also missing handwritten notes and letters. During the days before the internet, we would be exchanging notes in the office. Do you remember the Post-It of 3M? That small pad with an adhesive at the back so you can stick it to the table? In the early years of the digital age, I would receive computer-printed cards using Printshop software. That would do in place of the usual greeting cards that we used to buy in the bookstores.

    But now it's the e-greeting that I receeive. That one with fancy fonts and graphics. Lately the e-cards are using videos with a variety of styles and gimmicks. And a sender would just click the selections and presto.

    So where do we go from here? How are the kids going to develop their writing skills in terms of physical handwriting, grammar, sentence construction and spelling? I don't know. I was born yesterday so at least I had experienced real writing, that one using pen and paper.
     
    #63
    Bill Boggs likes this.
  14. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2015
    Messages:
    4,590
    Likes Received:
    4,020
    I write handwritten letters to my mom and my ex's mom a couple of times a year. They have grown shorter because it hurts to write, and my handwriting is so atrocious, but I still write them and send tangible cards. I also receive them from those two, but once they or I are gone, I guess it will die out. My sister has stopped sending cards, and my brother never did. My friends don't bother. With them, it's all virtual cards, as @Corie Henson mentioned. By the way, I still use post-its. I also enclose a small handwritten thank you with the items I sell. I tend to print on those, though, since my handwriting can be difficult to read.
     
    #64
    Corie Henson likes this.
  15. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2015
    Messages:
    2,906
    Likes Received:
    2,419
    My husband has been complaining to me the other day that his handwriting seems to be turning for the worse. He is proud of his penmanship because he writes good, very clear and legible - he is a writer even before the computer came about. But now that he is stuck with the keyboard all the time, writing with pen is a rarity in his routine. Same with me, the only use of pen for me is when I sign an document. Even in jotting down notes, I use my phone for that. Maybe in the years to come, we might forget how to write with the pen and worse, we wouldn't be able to read our own handwriting. I would dread that day.
     
    #65
  16. Avigail David

    Avigail David Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    May 20, 2015
    Messages:
    355
    Likes Received:
    257
    After reading all the posts here, I feel so bad for flippantly letting my son skip the cursive writing and spelling pages in his English subject yesterday :). He's done very well, neatly and proudly with his work-of-art in the past lessons. I thought I was rewarding him by "advancing" him to move on to the next page. A little while ago, I took out his booklet and will sit with him again to encourage him to love the art of careful writing and spelling. He enjoys it, actually.

    What have we got to lose? We're not in a hurry!
     
    #66
  17. Jallesa Verdi

    Jallesa Verdi New Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2015
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    I do find it puzzling that kids don't know how to sign their names. However, I know that the real purpose of writing is to communicate thoughts and ideas. I would rather have someone be able to express themselves in the written word rather than be able to sign something. It might be a shame that our kids' signatures won't look like John Hancock's signature, however, times change. Cursive writing is not vital to our existence. In my opinion, it's not one of those battles worth fighting.
     
    #67
  18. Linda Shaw

    Linda Shaw New Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Kids don't know how to manually do anything anymore. I work in a high school and it is so sad to see high school kids that not only can't write cursive, do simple math but they can't tell time without their digital phones. When students are cashiers and the register doesn't tell them how much change to give the customer, they are lost. Thanks to cell phones and computers they write everything in abbreviation and expect electronics to do all the work for them.
     
    #68

Share This Page