Oregano Won't Die

Discussion in 'Crops & Gardens' started by Ruby Begonia, Dec 6, 2015.

  1. Ruby Begonia

    Ruby Begonia Very Well-Known Member
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    This summer I put two small plants of oregano in a hanging planter along with some basil, on my deck railing. We've had more than several freezes now but the oregano is alive and well! It's not even a southern exposure but the opposite. Not much sun. I've never grown oregano before so I ask, is this normal for this herb?
     
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  2. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    I've only had oregano one year, it was spicy oregano...so good! I think mine died because I was away in the hot summer and it didn't get water...a problem I have.

    I did find this though, seems pretty hearty...

    Perennial or annual? Although oregano thrives in a warm climate, it is a hardy perennial that returns year after year, without much work. A couple of my oregano plants are almost 10 years old, and they have withstood many a snowstorm and still continue to produce healthy, vibrantly colored leaves. Older plants still yield delicious leaves, but their potency decreases once they reach three or four years in age.
     
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  3. Ruby Begonia

    Ruby Begonia Very Well-Known Member
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    Thanks Chrissy. I take the article you gave as, the plant will resume growing after winter die back as a perennial does but I'm still amazed that the frost hasn't killed it yet. I don't even like it. I don't care much for dried oregano but a long time ago, someone gave me some fresh from their garden and it was great. What I have now isn't the same. Oh well, at least it's a spot of green out there for the time being. Thanks again.
     
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  4. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    When I lived in Idaho, I had three little oregano plants in a planter. They started to spread, and I planted them in the ground the next spring. They continued to grow and spread, and I harvested 2-3 crops of the oregano tops. You are supposed to cut them back just as they start to make a bud, and before they bloom. I dried and saved the tops to use that winter after the fresh oregano had died back.

    The next spring, my oregano came back up and had spread even more, so I divided it and planted more plants.
    By the time that I left Idaho, I had oregano plants all long the back yard fence, and harvested bunches and bunches each year.
    I think that if a person had some where it did not die back in the cold, it might live year around, and keep spreading.
    For some reason , the oregano that I have started since I lived in Alabama does not do as well as that which I was growing in Idaho.
    Of course, up there, I had horses, rabbits, and the llama; so I had a whole lot of fertilizer rototilled into the garden areas.
     
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  5. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    We had oregano before but not in hanging fashion. I actually had plans of buying hanging pots for our mint but I am so busy because of the season so it will be for January maybe. As with the oregano, I know it is a sturdy herb like mint that even just little water will satisfy it. With too much sun, I don't think it will die but I cannot say the same for winter because we have no winter here. For sure, the leaves will become brittle with the snow.
     
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