Light Bulbs

Discussion in 'Home Improvement' started by Chrissy Cross, Sep 8, 2016.

  1. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2015
    Messages:
    14,990
    Likes Received:
    13,734
    It doesn't happen all the time so I don't know if besides light what else might be a trigger. I only get the aura and it's not painful just not fun and puts me out of commission for 20-30 mins. I do feel out of it the rest of the day though.

    A sudden change in light is more apt to cause than a gradual change and adjustment.

    I will have to research and pay more attention when I get one.

    Thanks for your input, much appreciated.
     
    #26
  2. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    7,448
    Likes Received:
    9,808
    I don't like spending much time in a room with fluorescent lighting. I don't get a major headache from it but my head doesn't feel right.
     
    #27
    Chrissy Cross likes this.
  3. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    3,825
    Likes Received:
    3,421
    @Bobby Cole

    Boy, oh boy! You have whetted my appetite for technical argument, and you might by now, know what that means! Where might I start? Why might I? 'Spose it's due to electricity being my life, I guess.

    Frequency to most folks means trips to the bathroom, Bobby! As a young'un srudying Electric Theory in Freshman high school class, I began to finally grasp what was going on with electricity producing light. Everyday electricity sent into our homes and businesses turns on and off very quickly, constantly. Edison's light bulb cannot turn on and off 60 times every second, because the filament is so hot, it simply glows with a constant light output.

    Gas contained in a tube, as in a fluorescent lamp, DOES turn on and off, as fast as the Alternating Current does. So, the result is a "fluttering" sort of light. Aside from the possibilities with physiological effects, accidents have happened where a spinning object, say, a part being worked on a machine tool, happened to be turning at the same speed as that fluttering light was turning on and off, and the eye perceived the machine as standing still! It's called "stroboscopic effect". Widely used to measure the speed of rotating objects, later in wide use onstage as theatric nonsense. Ala Kiss, Alice Cooper, etc.

    LED light is produced in neither of he two ways above, no heated filament, no gas discharge, but rather passage of electric current through a special kind of "valve", a "diode" Each diode, thoug, can survive with only very low voltage applied. Heated filaments can be made to work at almost any voltage desired. Gas-filled tubes need quite high voltage. So, our houses having 120 volts would instantly burn out an LED diode. First disadvantage. Not a big one, though. Needing about 5 volts each, we string 25 LEDs like Christmas tree lights, in series, and they run on 120 volts! But, one quits, and they all go out. But, seeing them on all the new cars & trucks, (those red tail-lights are really attention-getters!) it wouldn't surprise me if LEDs are being made to operate at 12 volts. If not, then connect 'em in pairs of two in series.

    Now, my IMPONDERABLE: LEDs are bound to produce "fluttering" light, if operated on Alternating Current", are they not? Thus, similar physiological effects. Perhaps you can tell me if the new LED light bulbs for general use convert the A.C. to D.C., something I do not know. Ibought a 100-watt equivalent bulb just yesterday, for my shop's drop-light. It is quite heavy, as though some kind of iron-cored device is contained. I'd like to know. More about those bodily-effects, too! Maybe my mind is so foggily-cluttered constantly, I've never noticed any effect from fluorescent lights, for example. I loved "Cool-White", though, and was dismayed when the Fed banned them.
    Frank
     
    #28
    Bobby Cole likes this.
  4. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    1,401
    Likes Received:
    2,754
    Ah yes, @Frank Sanoica, a fellow enthusiast! Actually, LED's do flicker but at a higher rate than most artificial types of light so the retina isn't being worn out so quickly. The Hertz rating for incandescent and LED is about the same with the exception of rectified LED's which jumps to around 120 Hertz versus about 60. The higher rating the less noticeable it is to the retina.

    But let's go one step higher which is the Kelvin measurement which I KNOW you'll be interested in. Everything, as you know, emits heat and radio waves in the form of frequencies. Even color has it's own particular frequency which is what we're examining.
    A normal florescent or even incandescent works at an optimum of 4000K whereas a biologically tuned light (LED for example) works at around 14,000K which is much closer to the reality of natural light, heat and color.
    In almost all tests performed on students, whether in the college level or grade school level the rooms that used biologically attuned lights garnered better scores from nearly all of the students. Note: the students were all tested using both types of light but the rooms were identical in every other way down to the positioning of the teachers pencil. (I made up the pencil part but it does sound good, doesn't it?)

    One other thing about florescent light is that it can compound many diseases such as epilepsy, Lupus, Ménière's disease (migraines) and I dare not even try to spell the disease for those people who are super photosensitive to light frequencies. Even our pineal gland is affected in that our circadian rhythm is totally disrupted by the effects of non-biologically safe artificial light which includes both incandescent and florescent light.

    In short, it's mostly about color frequency and how our brains perceive what the retina is exposing it to.
     
    #29
  5. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    3,825
    Likes Received:
    3,421
    @Bobby Cole
    I find the coiled tube, whatever they are called, are offered predominantly in color output of around 2000 to 3000 K, whereas my eyes "like" 5000+. Those are available, but one must look for them, as they are in the minority on the shelves. "CFL" I believe they are termed, "Coiled Fluorescent Lamps".

    Pressed for time, but "Ahll Bi Beck!"
     
    #30
    Bobby Cole likes this.
  6. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    1,401
    Likes Received:
    2,754
    Yeah, I hate the CFL's because they are still, as the name implies, florescent. They still contain enough Mercury to make about 4000 gallons of water toxic and still have a hum. Even though the hum is almost inaudible we still pick it up and the visual is still working the heck out of our retina's. Everything added up plus that they only max out at about 3K Kelvin, to me makes them biologically harmful.

    Now, Cree and I am sure some other companies, put out a 5000K+ LED which can handle a variable resistor. (dimable)
    Amazon, Lowes, Home Depot et al all carry the higher Kelvin rated LED's. Matter of fact, I found a treasure for sure on sale at Walmart yesterday. A normally GE $65 4' LED shop light was on sale for $35.00 so yes, I bought it!
    At 5000K it showers a very large part of my shop with "daylight" and I'm actually thinking of going back today and buy up a couple more. They're pretty good looking so I'm thinking that the kitchen light, an old incandescent globe type thing, needs to be replaced. Oh yeah, the guarantee is for 22.5 years on the bulb.
     
    #31
    Von Jones likes this.

Share This Page