Let's Talk About Those Cliches

Discussion in 'Evolution of Language' started by Von Jones, Apr 21, 2015.

  1. Pat Baker

    Pat Baker Well-Known Member
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    These cliches mad us so mad when our parents said them to us, what about the first time you heard one come out of your mouth, did you look around for your mother? I have seen a greeting card that says something like Oh My God, I am Turning Into My Mother, Help!
     
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  2. Brittany Houser

    Brittany Houser Well-Known Member
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    YES! I have done that! When my daughter was small, I got frustrated with her because I had told her repeatedly to do something. To my horror, I heard myself say, " I've told you time and time again..." Those words came of my mom's mouth every time I was disobedient when I was little. Yep we do become our parents!
     
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  3. Richard Paradon

    Richard Paradon Well-Known Member
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    That is funny because so many times I would utter in desperation, "When I grow up, I won't be so mean to my kids!"
     
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  4. Von Jones

    Von Jones Veteran Member
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    I'm trying to remember the one about '....when the sun don't shine.' Help anyone.
     
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  5. Mal Campbell

    Mal Campbell Well-Known Member
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    I remember one about "putting it where the sun don't shine". That meant someone wanted to kick you in the butt, nice version.
     
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  6. Von Jones

    Von Jones Veteran Member
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    That's it! I just thought there was more to it than that.. but that's it. I googled it and it was one of many in the seventies and now it's the title and lyrics (refrain) in a song by Kristina Maria.
     
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  7. Mal Campbell

    Mal Campbell Well-Known Member
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    How about, "make hay while the sun shines", and "never put off until tomorrow what you can do today". I'm a procrastinator, so I always say, "Never do today what you can put off until tomorrow", which my son seems to have picked up on and taken to heart.
     
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  8. Mal Campbell

    Mal Campbell Well-Known Member
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    How about the opposite of, "Better late than sorry", which would have been, "That's like closing the barn door after the cows get out".

    My mom's favorite, when we were being exasperating, "I only have one nerve left, and you're getting on it". The next step up was "If you don't stop, I'm going to slap you clear into next week!!" :mad: That's when you knew you were in trouble.
     
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  9. Dave Sun

    Dave Sun Well-Known Member
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    You can lead a horse to water but you can't make him drink.
     
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  10. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    Don't count your chickens before they're hatched! :D
     
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  11. Mal Campbell

    Mal Campbell Well-Known Member
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    And before that, "Don't put all you eggs in one basket".

    Wow, I see that this is message 36 - we certainly got told a lot of cliches when we were younger. I wonder if the younger generation could come up with as many. I know when I was younger, I swore I'd never tell my kids these things. Let's hope they don't all die out with our generation.
     
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  12. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    I like them, because they actually teach lessons, for the most part. Many youngsters don't understand what they mean, so the lessons are lost. I worked with brain injury patients for a time, and we worked with them on sayings like this to re-develop their abstract thinking.
     
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  13. Brittany Houser

    Brittany Houser Well-Known Member
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    Unfortunately if the younger generation comes up with any, they'll be peppered with the F word! Cynical? Yeah, but true. Seems like that's all I hear anymore. Cliches were clever at least.
     
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  14. Richard Paradon

    Richard Paradon Well-Known Member
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  15. Richard Paradon

    Richard Paradon Well-Known Member
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    That was too funny, Dave! I hope she never followed through with her threat.
     
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  16. Mal Campbell

    Mal Campbell Well-Known Member
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    And as much as we may have hated to hear them, they did teach us principals and morals. They were a way to teach us right from wrong, and to think critically.

    That's so sadly missing in parenting today. I see parents all the time look away from a misbehaving child, trying to ignore the fact that their little Johnny is a heathen. Or else, you hear the endless, "Stop, don't make me tell you again", only to hear them say it 50 times.

    Our parents did their best to teach us about the world, and about what would be expected of us as adults. I guess that's why we see so many kids spend 6-8 years in college than move back home and live in the basement.
     
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  17. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    This was somewhat before my time, but it was still used by my parents, grandparents, and others, in my presence: Loose lips sink ships. I doubt many in the younger crowd would understand what it meant in general, let alone the origin.
     
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  18. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    That was before my time too, but not by too much, having been born in 1951. That was actually a U.S. propaganda campaign, which acknowledged the fact that Germany had spies living among U.S. citizens, gathering information from the regular soldiers or sailors, as well as the general public that could be helpful to them, in particular, when a ship might be setting out, or where they were going.
     
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  19. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    In Britain, the big WWII catch phrase was "Careless talk costs lives".
     
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  20. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    play fast and loose

    Fast and Loose was the name of an old cheating game, played in the middle of the 16th century. As explained by James O. Halliwell in his Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, Obsolete Phrases, Proverbs and Ancient Customs, from the Fourteenth Century (damn, that's a long title), Fast and Loose was "a cheating game that was played with a stick and a belt or string, so arranged that a spectator would think he could make the latter fast by placing a stick through its intricate folds, whereas the operator could detach it at once."

    However, the game must have been known much earlier than that because the phrase was defined in Tottel's Miscellany in 1547, as being synonymous with "to say one thing and do another," "to be slippery as an eel," or "to have loose morals." There is also a reference from that time period to a married student who played fast and loose, meaning he was unfaithful to his wife.

    touch and go

    "Touch and go" is used to express an uncertain, risky, or precarious state, or a narrow escape.

    It is believed that this phrase originated among sailors, as a reference to situations where a ship has found itself in a rocky area. With a large hit, the ship might sink or become stranded upon the rocks, so the phrase was used to describe a ship touching upon a rock, then moving on, touching upon another, and hopefully eventually finding its way out of the precarious situation.
     
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  21. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    Puttin' on the Ritz

    A fair number of men and women, from Amelia Bloomer to Captain Charles Boycott to the Earl of Sandwich and the Reverend William Spooner, are remembered as nouns, but fewer have made contributions so distinctive as to be immortalized as adjectives.

    One of them was Cesar Ritz. He was born in the village of Niederwald, Switzerland in 1850, the thirteenth child of a farming couple. He tended the family's cows until his father arranged for him to be apprenticed to a wine waiter at a nearby hotel. It didn't go well. After a year, he was fired and told that he would never make anything of himself in the hotel business.

    He tried again, was fired again, and moved to France, where he was fired a third time, this time for breaking dishes.

    Ritz persevered and eventually rose through the ranks of restaurants and hotels in Nice, Monte Carlo, Lucerne, Baden-Baden, and other of the favorite spots for the rich and famous of the day.

    By 1888, he had made enough of a name for himself that a former client, Rupert D'Oyly Carte, invited him to manage a new luxury hotel in London. Under his management, the Savoy became a sensation, known for its elegance, perfect service, and a chef that Ritz had hired, by the name of Auguste Escoffier.

    In 1896, Ritz was persuaded to open a hotel in Paris that would bear his name. He took two years to find a suitable building, a mansion on the Place Vendome, and to assemble the right furnishings. He ordered apricot-colored lampshades, believing that their muted light was flattering to women.

    Eventually, there were Ritz hotels in several cities, some better and ritzier than others. There were also dozens of enterprises in London and New York alone, from shirt-makers to fish-n-chips places, that bore the name.

    When told that his father's hotels were too fancy for some, his sone said, "The Ritz is not ritzy."
     
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