Knitting Socks - My Newest Skill

Discussion in 'Hobbies & Crafts' started by Julie Stewart, Jun 2, 2016.

  1. Julie Stewart

    Julie Stewart Well-Known Member
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    In October 2015 I decided to learn to knit socks - I read somewhere that they are more comfortable than bought socks and I decided to have a go.

    I was only an OK knitter but socks (I thought) are such simple things - how hard could it be?

    It was a nightmare. Double pointed knitting needles were like knitting with a hedgehog.

    The first sock took 6 weeks - knitting for about an hour - 90 minutes most evenings. The second only took 2 weeks. But they turned out different sizes - even with the same amount of stitches. The first one was baggy and uneven, so I unraveled it and made a 3rd - again it took about 2 weeks.

    I gave them to my daughter as part of a mix of small presents for Christmas. She loved them.

    I'm now hooked on knitting socks .... I'm still slow, but I have a small family. They're all getting some next Christmas.

    I'll bet loads of you ca knit socks in a jiffy!
     
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    Last edited: Jun 2, 2016
  2. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    [​IMG] You had me in 'stitches' there
    I am a useless knitter - always end up with more stitches than I started with :p
    My Mother, decided to use up leftover wool by knitting gloves
    The problem was it was the thick Aaron wool and it was a creamy yellow colour
    When finished, they looked like 2 bunches of bananas ! - I laughed for a week ! :p
    @Julie Stewart
     
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  3. Julie Stewart

    Julie Stewart Well-Known Member
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    Gloves are my next thing @Patsy Faye - presents for Christmas 2017!

    I love knitting with DPNs now - well, small things like socks and later gloves.

    I'm thinking of trying tea cosies the year after - I've found a wonderful pattern for a motorcycle tea cosy that I want for myself.

    This sounds like everybody will be getting tea cosy covers for Christmas 2018.

    Here's that first pair (I don't have a sock-shaper thing so they look scrunched up)

    socks.jpg
     
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  4. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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  5. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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  6. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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  7. Chris Ladewig

    Chris Ladewig Well-Known Member
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    They look good to me. You have way more patience than I. Like Patsy I always end up with more than I started with.
     
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  8. Julie Stewart

    Julie Stewart Well-Known Member
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    I am pretty patient - but I also spent a lot on wool and double pointed needles. You can see the sock on the right is a bit floppy around the ribbing. Fortunately, my daughter is a sturdy girl with sturdy legs. She asked for another pair without ribbing if possible. I then learned how to do a picot edge !!!

    Get me - "picot edge" - !! Thank you YouTube!

    @Joe Riley - that's a great cartoon. You are a wizard at finding relevant stuff super-quick. Google better be scared of you!
     
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  9. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    I totally enjoy knitting socks, too, @Julie Stewart , and in one of the earlier threads in the hobbies section, there is a picture of one of the socks that I had knitted.
    My mother-in-law was from Lancashire, England, and she was an excellent knitter. She also could crochet fine doilies, or pillowcase edgings, and do beautiful embroidery.
    We used to go and visit with the in-laws very often on weekends, and while the menfolk were out in the garage working on one of the vehicles, I was relegated to sitting in the house. I usually brought along a book to read; but you can't just do that forever; so she taught me how to knit, crochet, and embroider.

    I never became as proficient at any of those things as she was; but I loved making slippers and socks for my family. My (then) husband was a power lineman, and he needed work socks that went to his knees to go under his knee-high lineboots. Socks that long were hard to find; so I would knit them for him.
    The heels and toes were the only parts that wore out, so when that happened, I just ripped them back to the ankle, and redid the bottom part again.
    Since yarn back then came in dye lots, sometimes I could not exactly match the top of the original sock color; but it didn't really matter since they were hidden under his work boots anyway.
    They lasted almost forever.
    I think that all of my kids probably have socks that I have made for them still.
     
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  10. Julie Stewart

    Julie Stewart Well-Known Member
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    Eeee by gum! @Yvonne Smith - I'm a Lancy Lass by birth! My brother still lives in Middleton just outside Manchester. It's a small world ...

    My grannie could do loads of stuff like that - for her, as a child, it was a way of economizing. All members of her family were either cotton mill workers or coal miners and quite poor. She used to do something called "tatting" but I can't remember what it is - I'll have to look it up.

    I'll find your sock at some point as I meander around the highways and byways of SENIORSONLY ...
     
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  11. Ina I. Wonder

    Ina I. Wonder Very Well-Known Member
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    I was lucky enough to recieve a pair of socks knitted by @Yvonne Smith , and I love them. I wash them over and over, because they're much more comfy than any of the many slippers I've tried. This old log cabin has hardwood floors, and the cabin is up on blocks, so the floors can be the coldest thing in the place. I'm trying to wheedling more out her, but because her socks are so sought after, I must wait my turn. :p
     
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  12. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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  13. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    I've tried to teach myself to knit, but haven't had any success. Thankfully, I do know how to crochet and cross stitch/embroider, although I don't do much of that these days. I think they actually sell looms you can knit socks on, which I'd considered at one point. I'm not sure how it works exactly, but I would imagine you'd have to finish them off the loom, at least for the heels and toes. My great-grandmother tatted, but she died long before I was born. I've always wanted to learn, but I'm saving that for when I have more free time. It's nice to know some people still appreciate handcrafted items.
     
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  14. Julie Stewart

    Julie Stewart Well-Known Member
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    That's what everybody says about hand-knitted socks - that hey are so comfortable, more so than bought sock. I need to make a pair for myself!
     
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  15. Julie Stewart

    Julie Stewart Well-Known Member
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    I enjoy knitting because I can't sit and watch TV without doing something - sometimes I post on this forum whilst watching TV, like yesterday during the women's tennis final at Roland Garros.

    I need to remind myself what tatting is ..... I've just remembered that my Grandma also made lace with lots of little wooden bobbins.
     
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  16. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    I wish I could have seen my great-grandmother tatting. I'll have to make do with online tutorials when I get some time and am in the proper mindset to learn something new. I believe I have a tatting shuttle, but I have no idea where it is. Here's a site that gives some information about tatting, and she also has some tutorials: http://www.tattedtreasures.com/what-is-tatting/
     
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  17. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    I looked at the tatting page, and the articles they picture are truly beautiful, @Diane Lane . I don't think i am going to try lerning to tat at this point in my life though. Even crocheting with fine threads is hard for me, or even the fingering yarn. I just much prefer working with the larger 4-ply yarn. I can see it better, for one thing. And it is just easier for me to work with.
    Right now, I am at the time of year when I want to be outside as much as possible, and usually reading about something or watching tutorial videos in the evenings; so I seldom find time or inclination for handiwork.
    Once we are into the really hot part of summer, I will be doing anything that needs to be done outside as early in the morning as possible, or when it starts cooling off in the evening; so I will be inside more during the heat of the day, and working on projects.
    Wintertime is my traditional time for crafts though. No gardening or yardwork to speak of then, so I am in the house all of the time, and have lots of time for knitting and crocheting.
    What size of yarn did you use for your socks, @Julie Stewart ? Those are beautiful socks, by the way ! !
    I can relate to discovering the difference in size at first.
    Once you are used to 4-needle knitting, then it should be consistent; but I remember having socks or gloves coming out a different size at first, too. And even worse when I learned to crochet.
    All of my stitches were loose, and the slipper would have fit a Bigfoot ! !
     
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  18. Jenn Windey

    Jenn Windey Active Member
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    Knitting socks is my winter pass time. I confess I don't use needles, I actually use a loom so the results are more consistent and I can stop and start as I want. I don't count rows even though I have a nifty counter notion that would be helpful, usually with a loom you can easily see that the socks are about the same size within a row or two. Contrary to what people might think you can do many different type of stitches, there are a ton of easy to follow youtube video on the subject. I can usually finish a pair of simple socks in a weekend without to much effort/ I am the same way I like to do handwork while sitting by the fir or watching TV,
     
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  19. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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  20. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    Oh, my gosh, @Joe Riley ! !
    That picture just totally reminds me of my very first pair of knitted socks.

    I am doing much better now though, and here is what @Ina I. Wonder 's next pair will look like. I may try to add in a few more colors as I go because she said she wanted mis-matched bright colors that she can wear around the house.
    image.jpeg
     
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  21. Ina I. Wonder

    Ina I. Wonder Very Well-Known Member
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    @Yvonne Smith , you are so funny, but you'll not discourage me. I have always liked crazy quits, and the oddly beautiful way they come together.. I know you think me a bit nuts, because I don't want my knitted sock to be matching, but I like the idea of scrap yarns making crazy designs in my socks. And, also I one gets lost or destroyed, all the rest still will go together. You never know,I might be starting a new fashion.

    I'm really not trying to drive Yvonne up a wall, but a different challenge can be fun, and maybe profitable.
     
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  22. Texas Beth

    Texas Beth Well-Known Member
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    I admire your learning to knit. Several years ago I tried to learn to crochet from a fellow teacher. Unfortunately, the edge of my coaster was uneven as I kept loosing count of my stitches. I became discouraged and haven't had the guts to try again. I just keep remember how those women's fingers would fly as they crocheted. Sigh.
     
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  23. Julie Stewart

    Julie Stewart Well-Known Member
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    That's a great site @Diane Lane it brought back memories of my grandma used to do. She'd laugh at the opening paragraph though : "Tatting is an ancient form of lace making, traditionally frequented by upper class ladies due to the enormous time involved. Notably, Queen Victoria of England and Archduchess Maria Theresa of Austria enjoyed tatting." Because she was a working class mill girl until she was 70 and didn't have any spare time.

    I remember more now - she made antimacassars to protect her sofa and chairs from hair products such as lacquer and the Brylcream that my grandad, dad nad uncles used to use in the 1960s. I remember my grandad used to say "I'm leaving Aunty Macassar at home and going to Uncle Mylocal" - (ie: the pub). He though it was funny ..... every single time .....
     
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  24. Julie Stewart

    Julie Stewart Well-Known Member
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    @Yvonne Smith - I used "sock wool" - honestly, that's what it was called. And it is self-striping! I loved it. Wool in France; the UK and the US all have different names for their uses/weight. What is called "fingering" in the US is called 2-ply in the UK. Here in France they simply go by needle size. All wool has a label with which size of needle to use and the patterns are designed around needle size - so you just go off to the shop and pick the yarns you like, then check if they are suitable for the needle size of the pattern. Once I finished those socks I then bought wool for the size of needles I had used - and made my daughter a plain grey pair.
     
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  25. Julie Stewart

    Julie Stewart Well-Known Member
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    A sock loom sounds cool - quicker than needles. I read about "second sock syndrome" - I didn't have it until I knew it existed! So I researched the possibility of knitting the two socks of a pair at the same time. I stumbled across something called "magic loop" and got very scared. I might look up sock loom next!
     
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