Interesting Study On Language

Discussion in 'Education & Learning' started by Diane Lane, Jun 19, 2015.

  1. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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  2. Jennifer Graves

    Jennifer Graves Active Member
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    I believe it, but I can't wrap my mind around it. I'm trying to picture it and there nothing there
     
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  3. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    I believe that language can affect the culture but not the person per se. In our place, we have different dialects and one of which is Ilonggo which is spoken in the province of Iloilo. Their intonation is down-up such that it makes for a romantic tone. So they say that people from that place are romantic people and even when they are already angry, they still talk softly.

    There is another dialect called Ilocano from the northern part. It is hard in intonation so the speaker is kind of strong. People from that place are branded as industrious and achievers because the speak with determination. Our former president Ferdinand Marcos is an Ilocano.
     
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  4. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    I studied linguistics, so I find the subject interesting. One of the curious aspects of linguistics is that it's essentially a science that is pushing its nose into an area of the arts. As a result, it tends to be an subject where there is a great deal of debate and an even greater deal of argument. The formalists can never agree with the socio-culturalists, who in turn can never agree with the cognitives. I'd love to see a debate on this particular theory, preferably between two battle-hardened, opposing theorists.
     
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  5. Jennifer Graves

    Jennifer Graves Active Member
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    How hard is it to understand the different dialects? I live in the southeast US, and my accent is very different than people in the north or west. But it isn't like different dialects. Having several in one country can't be easy, I wouldn't think.
     
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  6. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    We hardly understand the dialects. I speak the Tagalog dialect which is now called Filipino, the official language of our country. In other provinces, I will have difficulty in communicating with the oldtimers. When I went to the far north, it was better to communicate in English than in Filipino. That is the problem with our country. You travel an hour and the dialect is already different. But somehow, those in the provinces are now learning Tagalog so they can communicate with people in Metro Manila.
     
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  7. Jennifer Graves

    Jennifer Graves Active Member
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    I've seen several movies from the phillipines. I won't watch it dubbed, i have to have subtitles. But I've noticed that whatever dialog it is, there are English words thrown in here and there. It makes it a lot easier to understand exactly what's going on.

    The Road is a great movie.
     
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