I Think I'm Going To Phase Out The Non-stick Pans

Discussion in 'Food & Drinks' started by Kitty Carmel, Oct 5, 2017.

  1. Kitty Carmel

    Kitty Carmel Well-Known Member
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    I do have them.

    My wok shape hardly used will go to PAWS. My larger fry pan is ready for the trash. Will keep the small one as back up. But after scoring two vintage Revere Ware stainless fry pans, 10 dollars total, at the thrift shop I'm ready to stop using the non stick. Cooking and clean up is a little different but I don't want to use those non stick anymore.

    Now my cookie sheet has to go and I have one loaf pan also I have hardly used.

    Stainless cookie sheets are hard to find and expensive but I'm ready to put the money out.
     
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  2. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Kitty Carmel
    Please, why the concern over non-stick? True, Teflon and other non-stick coatings have earned a dubious reputation, healthwise. However, I recently picked up a ceramic coated skillet which is absolutely marvelous! I think the ability to apply ceramic material to an aluminum surface is a fairly new breakthrough. The commonest ceramic material used for knives and cookware is Zirconia, an extremely hard and tough temperature-resistant material which is completely safe. We often think of Porcelain as "ceramic"; maybe it is. Frank
     
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  3. Shirley Martin

    Shirley Martin Veteran Member
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    IMO, you can't beat cast iron frying pans.
     
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  4. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    Yeah, my preference is cast iron too.
     
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  5. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
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    Trouble is..cast Iron is sooo heavy... I have arthritis in my hands..and currently also tendinitis in my shoulders ( both of them)... much as I would love cast iron.. I couldn't lift them especially when they're full...
     
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  6. Kitty Carmel

    Kitty Carmel Well-Known Member
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    I know this came up in another thread I posted regarding the cast iron. I'm worried it will be hard to season. Though I can look that up on the internet and new ones are not made as well I have heard.

    @Frank Sanoica I am talking about the Teflon variety. I have frying pans and my cookie sheet is coated. One of the dark ones. I'm looking into ordering stainless steel now. I've heard of the ceramic. Good to know you like yours.
     
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  7. Gloria Mitchell

    Gloria Mitchell Very Well-Known Member
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    @Kitty Carmel , I have thrown away so many teflon pans over the years. Once they are scratched and start peeling,I think of them
    as a major health issue. I have several cast iron skillets, which is my preference, but they are heavy and hard to handle sometimes.
    i just leave them on the stove and dip out what I intend to use. Plus food does taste different in cast iron vs, teflon - or it does to me.
    Last Christmas, my hubby bought me a new set of pans, not teflon but similar. They work good.:)
     
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  8. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    What about plain, uncoated aluminum? Standby for a zillion years. Sad to contribute to Alzheimer's. My MIL calls it "Old-timers' ". The ceramic-coated skillets I'm seeing are aluminum. Lightweight, overall but beware of thin bottoms, they bulge outward and inward with use. My ne one is pretty thick on the bottom, with round grooves which withstand bending.
    Frank
     
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  9. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    That would be my problem also. :(
     
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  10. Ina I. Wonder

    Ina I. Wonder Very Well-Known Member
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    I’m lucky enough to have inherited my grandmother’s cast iron. My favorites are a 15” and 6” frying pan, and a Dutch oven. As long as I do the cooking my grandson will move and wash them. :)

    @Frank Sanoica , your right that porcelain is a type of ceramic. I was a potter for many years, and both are forms of clay. I know most people have heard of porcelain and ceramic dolls, and making clay doll heads was a skill all by it’s self.
     
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  11. Mike Dobra

    Mike Dobra Member
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    Thirty years ago we bought a set of French Le Creuset cast iron pans in broken white, complete with mounting stand. One pan is turning brown inside through over use, but the handles are complete. carol has tried others and they all end up in a charity shop. \There was a scare about alu pots causing dementia....
     
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  12. Kitty Carmel

    Kitty Carmel Well-Known Member
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    I'm considering one of these. Thirty years is getting a lot of use out of a pan. I like using the stainless steel ones I got at the thrift store. Hard to clean though. I need some new spatulas for them now though.
     
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  13. Ann George

    Ann George Active Member
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    A few years ago we got rid of all our old non stick cookware and replaced them mostly with aluminium and some cast iron ones. Since then, an MD we know advised all her family members to get rid of their non stick pans as she believed they were not safe to use.
     
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  14. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
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    That's the reason I won't have stainless steel because of the difficulty cleaning them
     
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  15. Mike Dobra

    Mike Dobra Member
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  16. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Holly Saunders
    Commonly, cookware made of Stainless Steel is made of type 18-8, often silverware made of it are so marked. Interestingly, 18% Chromium, and 8% Nickel, both are poisonous, probably to a much greater degree than Aluminum.
    Frank
     
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  17. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
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    is that a fact? :eek:
     
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  18. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Holly Saunders
    Well, we could research toxicity of Chromium and Nickel.........
    Frank
     
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  19. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    I use non-stick for almost all my cooking and have never had any problems with it. I have one cast iron stew pot which was my Mom's and I haven't used that one in years. For my gumbos and soups I have some kind of metal pot which works fine for those things. I used to have all magnalite pots but gave those away years ago when I read they might contribute to Alzheimer's.

    Everytime I turn around it seems something is wrong with one thing after another. I don't really listen to that stuff anymore and use the pots that are easiest to clean to cook in. My non-stick coating stays on as long as I use the right utensils for them and I don't put them in the Dishwasher either.
     
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  20. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
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    As soon as my non-stick pans show even the slightest sign of wear they go into the bin... like you Babs I use the proper utensils, I buy high quality non-stick cookware, and they last a long time
     
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  21. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
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    Is cooking in aluminum pans harmful?

    First, let’s put this myth to rest: Aluminum pots and pans are perfectly safe. About half of all cookware is aluminum, usually coated with a nonstick surface or treated for some other purpose. And because stainless steel conducts heat so unevenly, most stainless cookware has an aluminum or copper bottom, anyway.

    Aluminum is the most abundant metal on the surface of the planet; it’s found in water, food, and common medicines such as aspirin and antacids. We ingest a tiny amount daily. If aluminum pots (or copper pots, for that matter) are untreated, they will react to cooking highly acidic foods such as tomatoes or sauerkraut. This may cause corrosion of the surface and allow a minute amount of aluminum to be released, but less than even an aspirin may contain. Aluminum toxicity requires ingesting or inhaling large amounts

    [​IMG]
    By Marilyn vos Savant
     
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  22. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    Aluminum is very reactive chemically, and it might prove surprising to some that when very finely powdered it can burn with explosive rapidity, producing extremely intense white light. The familiar white bursts of fireworks displays are achieved using powdered aluminum.

    Another very light metal, Magnesium, which is used structurally for it's lightness, as in some combustion engines and aircraft parts, is very similar chemically to aluminum, and commonly college Chemistry classes are provided with eye-opening proof of magnesium's reactivity: thin strips of the metal may be easily lit with a match, whereupon they burn with intense white light, producing white smoke which is composed of magnesium oxide. Here's a demo:



    So what? Ha! Ever taken Milk of Magnesia? It's Magnesium Oxide, hydrated with water to Magnesium Hydroxide. My Dad called it "Chalk-water"!
    Frank
     
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  23. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    When I was growing up, my mother had stainless steel Revereware pots and pans with the copper bottoms. I have used the non-stick pans, and I think that the newer ones are supposed to be safer than the ones that they first came out with; but I still like the stainless steel ones the best. You do have to be more careful not to let anything burn because food does stick to the bottom easier.
    I like the ceramic pans, too; but those are very expensive. My daughter has the La Creuset set of pans, and she has used them for a long time and she really likes her pots and pans.
     
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  24. Kitty Carmel

    Kitty Carmel Well-Known Member
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    I have stainless steel pots and don't have much trouble keeping them clean at all. I find the stainless steel frying pans are harder and I'm sure it's due to the oil. I'm going to look into a Le Crueset pan or try a iron frying pan.

    I'm also looking at expensive cookie sheets from All Clad to replace the dark sheet I have. I also have stainless round cake pans that were a in new condition score at the thrift shop 25 or so years ago and still working great. I use them for all kinds of things.

    My loaf pan is the dark non stick also. I don't use it much but they still make pottery loaf pans in the US such as Emerson Creek and I may buy one form them as a replacement.
     
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