Henderson Island: Very Remote Area

Discussion in 'In the News' started by Frank Sanoica, May 19, 2017.

  1. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    This confirms suspicions I have harbored quietly for years, ever since the news emerged that sea birds were dying from accumulations of six-pack beverage-can plastic "carriers" caught about their necks----remember that? Frank



    "The researchers say the density of trash was the highest recorded anywhere in the world, despite Henderson Island’s extreme remoteness. The island is located about halfway between New Zealand and Chile and is recognized as a UNESCO world heritage site."

    "Jennifer Lavers, a research scientist at Australia’s University of Tasmania, was lead author of the report, which was published Tuesday in “Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.”
    Lavers said Henderson Island is at the edge of a vortex of ocean currents known as the South Pacific gyre, which tends to capture and hold floating trash.
    “The quantity of plastic there is truly alarming,” Lavers told The Associated Press. “It’s both beautiful and terrifying.” "


    See: http://www.torontosun.com/2017/05/1...8-million-pieces-of-trash-on-henderson-island

     
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  2. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    Yep - know about this and its bloomin' terrible :(
    We have the problem here also - thank goodness they finally clamped down on the carrier bags here
    should have happened years ago - why are remedies so slow :rolleyes:
     
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  3. Gary Ridenour

    Gary Ridenour Very Well-Known Member
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    comes from trash dumped by ships. which is supposed to be illegal. oceans are dumping grounds.



    the link says its part of the Pitcairn Islands group. on googles map all i saw was Henderson Is. I always thought Pitcairn was a single island. history links it as the island where the mutinous crew of the Bounty landed.
     
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  4. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Gary Ridenour .".... history links it as the island where the mutinous crew of the Bounty landed."

    I always thought of Pitcairn as a single island, too. Story went the crew seized the Bounty, put Captain Bligh and his officers in a rowboat, and sent them off. They made it to Pitcairn Island, a feat in itself pretty damned amazing. Frank
     
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  5. Gary Ridenour

    Gary Ridenour Very Well-Known Member
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    check it out. Pitcairn is a thriving community today. I think these 2 islands are the same. last I heard relatives of the mutineers still live there today. Bligh received the highest praise in the Navy for navigating that little rowboat almost 3,000 miles to Timor. he was Capt. Cooks navigator. also I read he was not the mean SOB hollywood made him out to be.
    LAND OWNERSHIP
    Land formally was held under a system of family ownership, based on original division by Fletcher Christian and his companions, and modified after their return from Norfolk Island in 1864.
    Up until recently each family had several plots of land for their home and gardens under a more traditional land use/ownership system.
    In 2006, a land reform ordinance was enacted. This gave local government more effective land management controls and in addition, freed up 'locked land', for use by residents.

    link
     
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  6. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Gary Ridenour
    Bligh went on to become Governor of Australia, maybe the 4th., quite early-on during the penal colony's beginnings. Formidable opposing forces by
    the Cavalry, led by a MacArthur, eventually got him charged with treason, for which he was sent back to England to stand trial. In reality, Bligh seemed to be a most honorable leader, was exonerated. MacArthur was a conniving criminal S.O.B.

    A wonderful series of historical novels details Australia's beginnings through semi-modern times, written by William Stuart Long, is on my list of "must read again". They are:
    William Stuart Long, The Exiles, about English prisoners transported to Australia in the late eighteenth century...
    William Stuart Long, The Settlers, about colonists struggling to survive in the Australian wilderness...
    William Stuart Long, The Traitors, about a rebellion against the king that threatens to destroy the hard-won gains of the Australian colonists...
    William Stuart Long, The Explorers, about the exploration of Australia at the turn of the nineteenth century....
    William Stuart Long, The Adventurers, about Australia after the First World War;
    William Stuart Long, The Colonists, about the threat to the Australians by distant powers
    William Stuart Long, The Gold Seekers, about people seeking their fortunes after the discovery of gold in the Australian Outback
    William Stuart Long, The Gallant, about native-born white Australians who enlist to fight for the British Empire as new settlers continue to arrive
    William Stuart Long, The Empire Builders, about Australians striving to add New Zealand to the British Empire
    William Stuart Long, The Seafarers, about the mate on a seafaring clipper ship
    William Stuart Long, The Nationalists, about the movement to "unlock the land;"
    William Stuart Long, The Imperialists, about Australia at the turn of the twentieth century

    I believe Bligh's story occurs in The Traitors, my wife & I read them through The Colonists, I believe, but no further. We did a whole lot of reading during the year we lived in a cabin in northern Arizona, out of work, and living "off the land".
    Frank
     
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