Finally. A Little Sense

Discussion in 'Education & Learning' started by Bobby Cole, Jun 19, 2016.

  1. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
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    In this last year Arizona has decided to make it mandatory for American senior high school kids to be able to pass the same civics test as an immigrant applying for U.S. citizenship does. If they cannot pass it, they cannot graduate the grade. For those who think that the mandate is a little extreme, it might be noted that an 8th grade U.S. student in 1945 had to know more about our government than our average present day graduating college student does.

    Riding along with the Arizona ruling, South Carolina has made Civics a mandatory course for all seniors looking to graduate. Imagine, a senior in high school who actually knows the three branches of government and who plays what part in each or even (and maybe) the difference between the Constitution of the United States and the Bill of Rights.

    Who can imagine what our young ones will learn when each state takes it's educational system back from the politically correct government run bureaucratic dumbing down of our present day students?

    Think of the possibilities: Math, History, and Geography might even be a part of school again. hmmmm...maybe even recess and Gym might come back to help solve the obesity problem.
    Yeah, I know that asking the students to know the Pledge of Allegiance and honoring the flag is a bit much on the wish list but...........who knows?
     
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  2. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    Will the teachers be up to speed to teach it?
     
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  3. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    That is in Arizona, you say. So that means Arizona graduates would know more about the country than graduates in other states? Well, we may be experiencing a paradigm shift. Even here, there are lost of changes that I don't even know the name of the school subjects. Gone are the English, Social Studies, History, Health and Science. Even P.E. for physical education has a different name now.

    The Philippine alphabet has also changed in the recent years. Where we used to have 20 letters - a, b, k, d, e, g, h, i, l, m, n, ng, o, p, r, s, t, u, w, y, now they have added the f and some other foreign letters such as x. I have to admit that I am left behind by the changes in our school system and probably wouldn't pass a general exam for grade school.
     
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  4. Janice Martin

    Janice Martin Well-Known Member
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    Sounds good to me.

    I had a teacher who went even further... on the first day of class- and bear in mind, it was an English class- she told us regardless of how well we did in class, homework, tests, etc., she'd automatically fail any kid who didn't know the words to The Star-Spangled Banner, and the school's Alma Mater.
    She was a wonderful teacher- we all loved her!

    These days, if a teacher presented those requirements, students and parents would probably throw tantrums and threaten to sue the school!
     
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  5. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
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    I might have been a bit premature with my hopes of an upcoming better school system.
    It seems that Wayne State University in Michigan has decided to put away their requirement for a math course in the curriculum and decided to opt for a "diversity" course instead.

    From my understanding, one of the classes includes the better use of a new series of pronouns that describe those transgenders who dislike the present pronoun system. It's pretty confusing to me but maybe ya'll can figure it out.
    To me, if a person looks like a he it's "Mr./he/him etc" and not a "zir" because they might be a transgender.
    Seriously though, are we now supposed to ask someone what they do in the bedroom and with which gender in order to figure out what to call them?
    hmmmmm.........Maybe that's why Wayne State has opened their new classes on diversity. We do not need to know how many restrooms might be in target, just what is politically correct when describing the folks who go into them.
    My bad! http://nypost.com/2016/05/19/city-issues-new-guidelines-on-transgender-pronouns/
     
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  6. Von Jones

    Von Jones Very Well-Known Member
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    I can accept transgender as a diverse sexual orientation but an additional pronoun, really? If the decision to change their natural gender was made you would think that 'he' or 'she' would suffice since it was difficult to hear before.
     
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  7. Janice Martin

    Janice Martin Well-Known Member
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    And to think, the older generation used to say they couldn't tell the difference between boys and girls just because many boys had long hair!

    I recall one older person, trying to be funny, said the only way you could determine whether somebody was male or female was look at the person's front-
    these days, even that wouldn't work!
     
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  8. Texas Beth

    Texas Beth Well-Known Member
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    If immigrants have to pass the test, then so should we. It is reasonable and fair.
     
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  9. Janice Martin

    Janice Martin Well-Known Member
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    I could be mistaken, but it seems academics started going down the drain when schools took on parental responsibilities.
    I mean how much time can there be in a school day for "The 3 R's" etc., when the schools have to teach anti-bullying, sex education, drug/alcohol resistance, etc. etc. etc.?

    I'm sure most people here can relate: when I was in elementary school, our school days focused on English, arithmetic/math, Social Studies; once a week or so we had art and music classes.
    And even in high school, it was almost entirely academics, with the occasional "elective" like ceramics.
    We didn't HAVE any of this other stuff- except briefly touching on the topics in Health classes.
     
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  10. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
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    Much to my own chagrin, I have to agree with your query @Joe Riley. Teachers come from the same colleges that all of the other playtime graduates come from hence the liberal arts uneducated teacher, teaching nothing but personal bias to starving brains waiting for intelligent input. After which.....those information starved zombies will then be the new instructors merely teaching little ones how to push buttons at some kiosk in order to feed themselves.

    It will not be long before the Erasmus statement of: In the land of the blind a one eyed man can become king, will be the norm. All intelligence will be held within a computerized module of sorts and the ones who can operate it best will be the eventual leaders no matter the IQ of the individual.
    The eventual generations will not be able to add, subtract, divide nor multiply (mathematically nor sexually) and the written word will be an abstract of a forgotten ancient script last seen and understood sometime between the 20th and 21st century. Fahrenheit 451 will become a reality.

    Will somebody stop me? I'm depressing myself to the point of trying to run for president.
     
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  11. Mari North

    Mari North Very Well-Known Member
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    :D Ya got my vote. I won't leave my chad hanging either... no worries.
     
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  12. Janice Martin

    Janice Martin Well-Known Member
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    Well, you're a member here, so you're clearly over 35 years of age... and it sounds like you have better ideas than the current main candidates. :)
     
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  13. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
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    True you! One thing though that threw the entire government school system under the bus was the creation of the curve system. Everyone in class is graded according to the performance of the entire class being tested.
    If a test has 10 questions on it and the top student only got 5 right then all it takes is to get 5 correct in order to garner an "A" then all other grades are given between 0 and 5. 4 right gets a B, 3 right a C, you get the point!

    When I went to school, if I was tested and the test had 10 questions in it, I had to ace the test with a 10 in order to get that A. Miss 3 or 4 you failed. Period. Do not pass go, do not collect nada!
    It is possible, by using the curve method you can ace the year and miss half of the questions in a test provided everyone studies on the same level as you.
     
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  14. Janice Martin

    Janice Martin Well-Known Member
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    Seriously? I never heard of that.
    The weirdest that occurred was the pass/fail option, but most teachers didn't go along with it. Students got the grades they earned.
     
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  15. Janice Martin

    Janice Martin Well-Known Member
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    Oh I missed this part of the post before-
    plus I'd bet if they gave kids gym and recess again, there'd be a heck of a lot fewer kids labeled with 'behavioral' problems.
    I can't imagine how awful it is for kids to not have free/active time- bad enough for the older students, but especially the little guys.
     
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  16. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    I always hated being graded on a curve. I have never liked being judged by the collective performance of myself and others, unless in an actual performance such as a play or dance routine, where those involved were actually somewhat motivated. I had to deal with that a bit in school and also at a few jobs that required team work, where we were all judged by the performance of the group. There always seemed to be at least one person who refused to do the work, and the burden would fall on the rest of the team, or the entire team would fail. I think the person who doesn't perform should be held accountable, and to not do so is a failure on the part of the supervisor or teacher/professor. Another similar irritant is when the entire class was punished for the misbehavior of one or two students.

    I think it's a great idea to actually teach what this country is about, and how and why it was formed. Learning how the government was designed to function may stimulate some of the students to look at how differently it actually functions from how ti was intended to function, and perhaps eventually inspire them to help make changes.
     
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    Last edited: Jun 22, 2016
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  17. Amie Ar

    Amie Ar Active Member
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    I hope Bobby the school will really teach students how Obesity will shape their future grimly indulging most on those junk foods! :(
     
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  18. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
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    Whether it is obesity or being graded on a curve I really believe the root of the matter is the "I'm okay, you're okay" attitude that started back in the late 60's.
    As humans, we are born competitive! It's in our makeup and there is virtually no one on earth who does not have some spark of it.
    By lumping everyone together *en mass* the competitive spirit starts to dwindle. Everyone in a race is a winner and everyone who does even half the study work is a good student. No more deans lists, no more honor role, no more valedictorians. Anything regarding personal esteem is being displayed as a wrong thing of the past.

    We must have people willing to go against the present grain and start making our students realize that there is another rung on the ladder of life and winning and losing are part of the climb. Everyone cannot win at all times the same as a loser who applies himself will not be a loser at all times. We as humans must taste the sweetness of victory in order to persue it again, and again whether it is in academia, sports or any endeavor of life. Anything less is what we are quickly approaching now: Sheep that are waiting to be sheared by those who teach mediocrity.
     
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  19. Amie Ar

    Amie Ar Active Member
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    There must be something in this Bobby. With the introduction of the so-called 'plus-size' especially in fashion and clothes, its as if getting fat and plump is okay. Is it? I was once a plus size Bobby but now I barely weigh 50 kilos. I needed to retain at this weight for me to have ease of mobility and carry myself better with ease. The left side of my body was weakened by the stroke I had last year 2011. I am on constant diet and regular exercise. Obesity is one factor in my stroke but when I had it was over stress and fatigue that trigger the neuron switch in that part of my brain to turn off and limit the oxygen that passed on it resulting to this condition. Thus, I am firm about nutrition here in the house and have to show them by example what are the things can and cannot to be taken especially to my only child and son. I am on strict vegetable and fruit diet with occasional lean and white meat only. It has been my advocacy to monitor the people in the house and keep on reminding them about my experience. If the risks of 'Obesity' be a subject in school, I am 201% all for it.
     
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  20. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    Perhaps this was because I grew up in the country rather than in a city, but mom put sugar even on things that I didn't want sugar on, like grapefruit and cereal, there was no such thing as obesity education in school, and I was in the ninth grade before they started physical education classes which, in the early days, consisted of little more than playing basketball or running around the gymnasium, yet each class seemed to have only one or two kids who were fat. Obesity didn't seem to be a problem then, except for those one or two kids, of course. Plus, I went all the way through high school before I ever met anyone with asthma, and I'm still not sure that peanut allergies aren't a work of fiction.
     
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    Last edited: Jun 28, 2016
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  21. Amie Ar

    Amie Ar Active Member
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    Ken, as one fact I have learned through research, readings and ;life experience most if not all of what we currently eat, organic and processed have sugars in it. Its just that people abuse and over consume it. Fact is, we really need sugar or in the medical term 'glucose' in our body to feed cells that need them especially the ones in our brain that triggers serotonin, the neurotransmitter that switches our moods and cravings. Its MODERATION that must be learned by people to do properly. There was no such thing as SUGAR FREE in our food really.
     
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  22. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Bobby Cole "Penalties of up to $250,000 can be imposed for violations that are deemed to be the result of malicious intent."

    There's the gist of it. Those folks implementing the new regulations do the "deeming" : it is their interpretation of the given circumstance which decide whether malicious intent was present, or even whether it was malicious or not. In most cases presenting, there will of course have been malicious intent, to generate revenue for the PC'ers, and provide proof their regs are working as planned.

    I give up. :(
     
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