Famous Hypochondriacs

Discussion in 'Philosophy & Psychology' started by Ken Anderson, Mar 13, 2018.

  1. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    Hypochondriacs are people who are abnormally anxious about their health. Some famous hypochondriacs include...
    • Howard Hughes - As a boy, Howard Hughes suffered from an undiagnosed affliction that caused minor hearing loss. Because of this, his mother became obsessed with his health, and Hughes began to associate being sick with being loved. Subsequently, he was sick a lot. As an adult, his hypochondria was made worse by his legendary obsessive-compulsive disorder and mental health problems. He died as an eccentric recluse.
    • Adolf Hitler - Hitler was known for his aversion to germs and fear of illness. He is said to have examined his own feces on a regular basis, checking for consistency. Eventually, he took on a man known as Doctor Theodor Morell, a quack who put him on a steady regimen of amphetamines, which made him even more unpredictable.
    • Hans Christian Anderson - The children's author is said to have been so afraid of being buried alive that he slept with a note that read, "I only seem to be dead," so that he wouldn't be mistaken for a corpse.
    • Charles Darwin - Darwin was a bit of a mess. It is unknown just what he suffered from, but he was ill most of his life, and many believe that, while he may have suffered from at least one affliction, his condition was exaggerated by hypochondria.
    • Florence Nightingale - Beginning when she was 37 years old, the founder of the Red Cross spent more than fifty years as a bedridden, almost agoraphobic invalid. Some believe that she suffered from chronic brucellosis, which causes severe muscle and joint pain, but others believe that she was a hypochondriac who used physical symptoms to manipulate people and that she was likely bipolar.
    • Sara Teasdale - The poet was raised by an overprotective mother who would send her daughter to bed at the first sign of a slight cough or sniffle. By the age of nine, she was fully convinced that she was simply a sickly person. Nearly every year, she would have to take a rest and convalesce at home, surrounded by blankets, medicine, and her writing materials.
     
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  2. Chris Ladewig

    Chris Ladewig Very Well-Known Member
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    I know a few people that just like to have something wrong with them. They just look for health problems. I guess they like the attention it gets them. I'm just the opposite, I don't like to or even sometimes admit to being hurt or ill.
     
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  3. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    My friend since high school, Charlie, still living in Chicago, is most definitely a hypochondriac. Add to it that his lady friend, Sandy, pressures him to go to the doctor for every minor hiccup. It seems that one or the other is visiting a doctor almost weekly. Charlie was born 5 days after I was. His illnesses (supposedly) have included prostate cancer (treated by the radioactive needles), kidney stones, treated chronically for about a year, colon polyps, eardrum problems (which required permanent "drains" implanted), and Lord knows what all else IO don't remember. Yet, he yearns to come out to AZ, and when here, swims out halfway across the mighty Colorado River, languishing in the cold water, as though the river beckons to him, even when he is away. If I attempted that feat, I would undoubtedly drown. Comparatively, though, my health issues are currently nil. Somehow, I feel many of the "aches and pains" complaints which build themselves up into (imagined) serious consequence, are part figments of overly active minds. For my part, I eat, enjoy it, walk, exercise, work at my restorations, eat, enjoy it, fight the bedeviling shoulder pain, enjoy my homemade wine, seek medical help only when I think it's absolutely necessary (like the past month or so, fever every day for 3 weeks!). BTW, the help sought, 2 hospital visits, 3 to the Dr., failed to reveal the source of the fever, but the last Dr. visit cured it. Cost? Hospital, ~$17,000. They sent me home with "sinusitis" (!!). Laughable.
    Frank
     
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  4. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    Very sad, such a waste of life in most cases
    Has to be a mental condition or as explained above - parent influence
     
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  5. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    Tapophobia was pretty common until modern day techniques came into existence to ensure whether a person is alive or dead.
    Some other well known folks were afraid of premature burial and set aside instructions as to how and when they were to be buried.
    One of the best known for his fears is Edgar Allen Poe who wrote "The Premature Burial" which played into the overall public's fear of being buried alive.
    Now, I did write that Poe suffered from tapophobia but it's a debatable subject as to whether he actually suffered from it or was simply marketing the fear.

    Other well known tapophobes were: Chopin, George Washington, Alfred Nobel and Renoir but again, the idea and fear of being buried alive was pretty common and to some extent, still is.
     
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  6. Chris Ladewig

    Chris Ladewig Very Well-Known Member
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    Isn't that why they started embalming people? To make sure no one woke prematurely buried.
     
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  7. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    It isn't the prime reason for embalming but it did allay some fears of being buried alive. Embalming is more for preservation and sanitation purposes than anything else and goes back thousands of years in some cultures.
     
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  8. Chris Ladewig

    Chris Ladewig Very Well-Known Member
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    I often wonder why we want to preserve a body unless it can't be buried in a timely fashion. Refrigeration should be all that's required.
     
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  9. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
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    Oscar Levant was not only a Stage & Screen Actor, Writer, Comedian, TV Show Host, and Concert Pianist, but also a well-known Hypochondriac.

    He was also the best-known interpreter of George Gershwin's great piano works, such as "Rhapsody in Blue" and "Concerto in F".
    Hal
     
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    Last edited: Apr 26, 2018
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