Erasing History

Discussion in 'History & Geography' started by Diane Lane, Aug 16, 2016.

  1. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    I grew up in New England, and so the history I encountered in local buildings, landmarks, etc., was relating to the American Revolution. But, a lot of the history down here in the south relates to other battles, as well as to the Confederate War. I'm seeing more and more stories like this one, wherein governments decide to erase history by removing statues, plaques, and changing the names of schools and other sites. I don't really understand what these people are hoping to accomplish. Are they also rewriting history in the text books?
     
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  2. Tim Burr

    Tim Burr Well-Known Member
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    I guess I could understand this move if this was a State run school, but Vanderbilt is a private university.
    Not much is written here in Nashville about the change.
    Times are changing.
    They can rewrite history, but oral history and family history endures.
     
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  3. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    It's all part of the PC movement in my opinion.

    Anyway, that's a lot of money to remove a word that according to the story people didn't even use anymore when saying the name of the building.

    Also, how far do you go? Something will always offend somebody.

    Should have used the money for a good cause....
     
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  4. Bill Boggs

    Bill Boggs Very Well-Known Member
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    Removing statues, flags, etc. is coming to be seen as racist. None of this changes history and should not be reflected in school text books, in my opinion.
     
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  5. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    Let me digress on the changing of names. I am against the renaming of streets and edifice much more with places. It really pains me to think that they are trying to change the landscape of our history and tradition. A main street in Manila called Azcarrage has been renamed Recto in honor of a former legislator. The road called Highway 54 was renamed E. Delos Santos Avenue which is popularly known as EDSA. So where is the world going to? In the future all places, streets and landmarks will be names of dead people.
     
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  6. Ike Willis

    Ike Willis Very Well-Known Member
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    After Isis takes control of our government, we'll be seeing a lot of this. We're being prepared for it now.
    video-undefined-261E573000000578-668_636x358.jpg

    And a lot of this too.
    ISIS-elements-during-the-implementation-of-the-execution.jpg

     
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  7. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    What really astounds me is that those on the left, who are proponents of this movement to rename buildings, take down statues, etc., because someone's delicate sensibilities might be offended, defend radical behavior from those we in the middle and on the right oppose. Those they defend are the ones who aim to tear down our society and replace it with one of their own choosing, which would ultimately bring down those on the left. That's just plain stupid, not to mention hypocritical.
     
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  8. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    http://endtimeheadlines.org/2016/11/city-renames-2-holidays-deemed-culturally-insensitive/

    Erasing history is happening more than just tearing down statues, etc. as the above article shows. Maybe America has become a diverse Society but there is no way that we can please everyone. When people used to come and live in America they agreed to accept America's language and ways, etc. Now everyone who comes here wants everything their way...this just cannot be done without destroying America...and that is exactly what is happening.
     
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  9. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    The whole concept of accepting illegals is ridiculous. Borders exist for a reason. There are many people waiting to come here legally, who are willing to accept the terms required, and comply with our laws. They should not be pushed to the back of the line in favor of those who have shown disdain for our laws and society.
     
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  10. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    And if we deported everyone who has shown disdain for what America has always stood for...we would have room for the ones who are willing to respect America and its terms. :)
     
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  11. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    Our history should be allowed to be whatever it was, and if we want to become better people than we were before, that gives us a place to move from and to measure our successes and failures. Closely related to this is the insistence on placing today's values or political correctness onto people in the past, and judging them to have been bad people because they wouldn't have fit in well in today's society. This is why much of Mark Twain's literature is being banned from the schools and people are no longer allowed to acknowledge or even learn about the honor that also existed among many of the leaders of the Confederacy, as it did within the Union, as well as in earlier times.
     
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    Last edited: Nov 23, 2016
  12. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    During the American Civil War, cease-fires were called, during which time both sides collected up their dead and dying at the front line.
    Frank
     
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  13. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
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    To use the analogy of driving a car once again, we have windows all around us and a rear view mirror.
    The largest window is always in the front with all other windows smaller than the foreword one. The interesting part is the rear view mirror which is much, much smaller than all of the other visual aids.

    The analogy will follow that it is much more important to keep looking forward while having at least a small view of what is behind us. But, if the mirrors were to be removed so that the past is no longer visible, the window in front will soon become irrelevant, for the accident that will happen is almost assured and a harsh injury or death will be the product of our stupidity.
     
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  14. Bill Boggs

    Bill Boggs Very Well-Known Member
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    Isis is not going to take control of anything outside Middle East.
     
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  15. Ike Willis

    Ike Willis Very Well-Known Member
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    When I wrote that I was assuming Hillary would win the election. Thank God she didn't.
     
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  16. Martin Alonzo

    Martin Alonzo Very Well-Known Member
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    If Hillary had won I would probably have Frank as a next door neighbour here in the DR and that would be a good thing.
     
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  17. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    ulysses-grant-slaveholder.jpg

    Who is buried in Grant’s tomb? Ulysses S. Grant, slaveholder. Grant owned slaves until 1865, when Missouri abolished slavery. In contrast, Confederate General Robert E. Lee freed his slaves in 1862, upon the death of his father-in-law.

    “There are few, I believe, in this enlightened age, who will not acknowledge that slavery as an institution is a moral and political evil.” -- Robert E. Lee
     
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  18. Martin Alonzo

    Martin Alonzo Very Well-Known Member
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    Blacks own slaves as well so does that make black bad ????
     
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  19. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
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    @Martin Alonzo
    But who owns the slaves who are not black?
    Frank
     
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  20. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
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    First off, I need to qualify myself by saying that there is nothing inherently good about slavery of any kind.
    That said, slavery was all about supply and demand for a product and the demand for said product was high early in American history. Now, simply put, that there are those who wish to obliterate anything that would remind all of us of our own history if there was any hint of slavery in the mix of whatever portion is found in it.
    I might be able to see some small bit of validity in the movement if it were not for the fact that most of the hostility is coming from people who proudly carry the name of African-American.

    The question has been asked thousands of times by millions of people as to why are people so proud of their mother continent when it was their mother continent which allowed their ancestors to be sold into slavery in the first place? As a matter of fact, Africa still has a huge problem with slavery (both white and black slaves) that I would believe that taking on the name of the host continent would be some sort of type of denigration rather than one of greatness.

    No, I am not attempting to make light of any aspect of the making of human beings as a common commodity to be bought as sold. I am saying quite the opposite for to me it is like the drug trade in that I feel badly for the user but I realize that getting rid of the user is not the way to get rid of drugs. I go back to that which I despise the most which is the seller.

    If the progeny of slaves on American soil wish to destroy the objects which might or might not point to slavery then I would start by completely removing that which is very source of my disgruntled convictions. I would think the very name of Africa and all it stands for including its slave selling culture would first be under attack rather than being championed. When I see people like Michelle Obama wearing diamonds and talking about slavery it crawls up my back like an itch I can't scratch. The very diamonds she wears are more than likely dug up by none other than African.......slaves.

    I do not see anyone destroying their diamonds which to me are the greatest reminder of what slavery is about. It's all hypocritical.
     
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    Last edited: May 13, 2017
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  21. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Very Well-Known Member
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    The absolute idiocy of the gambit as a whole is that while the past is condemned there is not one person on the face of the earth who can tell me that they would not have been involved in the high interest bearing commodity of the slave business if they were born 200 or more years ago. Not one!
    For the most part, it was accepted by a majority of countries and whole continents and totally legal.
    We can lie to ourselves, stomp our feet and weep for past indignities imposed on other races, genders and beliefs but it was part of the norm and environment of that time. We can yell from the roof tops that we would have NEVER held indentured servants or slaves had we lived in a far gone historical era but it would be nonetheless a lie because we do not know. I'd be pure as the driven snow and would stand up as a bastion against all the sins man imposed on man. It's a Lie because I do not know but always fear who I might have been rather than who I am and what I presently stand for.

    For me, I will continue to embrace the past and all of its rights and wrongs so that I can see the possibilities of a better future.
     
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  22. Gary Ridenour

    Gary Ridenour Very Well-Known Member
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    they can't erase this because past generations insure present and future generations see it. you can tear down the monuments but not the events. which live forever

     
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  23. Martin Alonzo

    Martin Alonzo Very Well-Known Member
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    • A reflex ion the slave history
    • 6800 B.C. The world’s first city-state emerges in Mesopotamia. Land ownership and the early stages of technology bring war—in which enemies are captured and forced to work: slavery.
    • 2575 B.C. Temple art celebrates the capture of slaves in battle. Egyptians capture slaves by sending special expeditions up the Nile River.
    • 550 B.C. The city-state of Athens uses as many as 30,000 slaves in its silver mines.
    • 120 A.D. Roman military campaigns capture slaves by the thousands. Some estimate the population of Rome is more than half slave.
    • 500 Anglo-Saxons enslave the native Britons after invading England.
    • 1000 Slavery is a normal practice in England’s rural, agricultural economy, as destitute workers place themselves and their families in a form of debt bondage to landowners.
    • 1380 In the aftermath of the Black Plague, Europe’s slave trade thrives in response to a labor shortage. Slaves pour in from all over the continent, the Middle East, and North Africa.
    • 1444 Portuguese traders bring the first large cargo of slaves from West Africa to Europe by sea—establishing the Atlantic slave trade.
    • 1526 Spanish explorers bring the first African slaves to settlements in what would become the United States. These first African-Americans stage the first known slave revolt in the Americas.
    • 1550 Slaves are depicted as objects of conspicuous consumption in much Renaissance art.
    • 1641 Massachusetts becomes the first British colony to legalize slavery.

    The while slavery done by the Barbary pirates . Which was even more cruel than the African/ American.

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/british/empire_seapower/white_slaves_01.shtml

    Funny that if you do a Google search on just the word slavery you will get more hits on the American slavery than on any other Why are they making this more important you know why.
     
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  24. Martin Alonzo

    Martin Alonzo Very Well-Known Member
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    Most people have forgot this because the Japanese did not own the news media and Hollywood
    Japanese Internment during WW II
     
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  25. Gary Ridenour

    Gary Ridenour Very Well-Known Member
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    there was a reason for the internment of the Japanese after Pearl Harbor. before this attack Japanese pilots were told if their aircraft were damage and could not make the trip back to the Carrier TF's to head west and land on an Island called Niihau also known as “The Forbidden Island". believed to be uninhabited they would be picked up by submarine. one such pilot, Shigenori Nishikaichi flew a Zero in the attack that morning and was damaged. so he flew to this island. the western most island in the Hawaiian chain. but upon landing he found the opposite. the population there was part Japanese, Americans and British. the pilot tried to convince the Japanese there the other's were their enemies. a battle ensued.

    [​IMG]

    One thing is for sure, the actions of Yoshio Harada either contributed to or justified the reasons of relocating people with Japanese roots to internment camps.

    Incident link
     
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