Education System

Discussion in 'Education & Learning' started by Martin Alonzo, May 18, 2015.

  1. Martin Alonzo

    Martin Alonzo Very Well-Known Member
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    Education is a way to teach regurgitation of information. Prime example is who discovered America if you were to put Christopher Columbus you would get a correct mark because this is what you have been taught. If you were taught to think you would know how ridiculous this is, as the Indians have been here for years before the birth of Christopher Columbus also so the Viking landed in Canada 100 years before him. But if you were to use these answers you would be wrong. The education system wants you to believe without question what they are saying if you question you fail.

    A yes - no answer or a true or false does not give the person an opportunity to say neither is correct There could be a third option that might be right. If you were to ask is gray black or white the answer is neither or both.

    Some new educational systems are teaching kids to think and not just repeat what they are taught.

    I only hope this becomes the normal and not the exception.
     
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  2. Pat Baker

    Pat Baker Well-Known Member
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    The school system has changed a lot since I was in school. Teaching kids to think and use logic to work out a problem does not seem to come into the program for the schools today.
     
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  3. Brittany Houser

    Brittany Houser Well-Known Member
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    Yes I agree! Logical and analytical thinking are not broached by the educational system at all! I really hate to say it, but the school system is made up of a lot of left-leaning people who seem to look at our kids as some sort of social experiment! I might add that that does not necessarily include the teachers. Neither the teachers, nor the Principle have any power in the schools anymore. I know some of them who are very frustrated by this.
     
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  4. Hannah Davis

    Hannah Davis Active Member
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    Yes, the educations system is now quite flawed. Most of the blame for this falls on the govenment. First there was the whoel no child left behind, then this test and that test. I know a few people who worked in the education system who said half the time it was like they were teaching to prepare kids to take a test not to learn the basics such as when we were in school. Then there are the constant cuts that that are taken from education in states in order to balance budgets, all this does is cut down on faculty and hours for staff, another thing that is not good for students because it leads to a whole lot of over crowding in the class rooms.
     
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  5. Edwin Clarke

    Edwin Clarke New Member
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    The so-called "Outcomes Based Education" has been tried in various guises and is largely responsible for the disastrous state of education in many countries, including the USA. On paper it looks fine, but, like Communism, it just never works.

    Home schooling circumvents many of these problems, and home schooled children generally do better than average, but it has its problems too.

    Perhaps the root of the problem lies in politics. Elected idiots make the decisions, not those who have proved themselves with a long track record of good results. They are the ones forced to change their methods that work and fill their student's minds with politically correct mush.
     
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  6. Jorge Ruiz

    Jorge Ruiz Member
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    Hey all.

    This could turn into a very lively discussion.

    We're all of an age. We've all probably been in the school system either before or right at the outset of senseless meddling that has led to current discontent with the education of the young. In my case, it was the introduction of the so-called "new math" in the early 1960s. Instead of teaching kids how to add, subtract, multiply and divide, we were given story problems and drawings of pencils bundled into sets and sub-sets. I don't think that "new math" retarded my capacity for math (part of my current work is accounting work and at least adding and subtracting and doing percentages and fractions are of no consequence to me, so must have learned something!)

    My mother went to school in a one-roomed school house. Her stories included trudging through snow with a hot potato in her pocket to keep her hands warm and to later eat for lunch, as well as not having a pen or notebook or even a pencil, but rather a slate board and chalk to do her school work. She finished high school hell with no problems and began working at once as a telephone operator, so her education not only served to show that she could stick it out (a lot of kids dropped out back in those days) but helped her to become an avid reader and a creative thinker. It also helped her to realize the importance of education for her own children, which she fostered.

    I suppose that most of us here belong to a generation that school meant opportunity and not simply the four "r's". In my case it was to be the first member of the family to go to university instead of joining the military. In any case, the education that I received seemed to have some realistic "goal" or "motivation" related to future development built in. I think that's were a teach-to-test type of education falls quite short. If the goal is to get a good grade on the test, once that grade has been achieved, what more is there to strive towards? If the goal is to further your education, to improve your knowledge, to get an interesting job with chances for promotion, then education does not stop with the diploma (as anyone who has worked outside of manual labor is quite well aware of-- most learning takes place on the job, not in the years of classwork that proceeded it).

    The model for education probably needs to focus on goals and motivation of the students. It should not be a question of getting more budget money for the school or being listed on the top ten list of exam results. It should probably be directed at the students, their imagination, their curiosity, their needs. Unfortunately, this is just not possible, I believe, in an institutionalized educational setting.

    peace,
    revel.
     
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  7. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    I missed the one-room schoolhouse by one year. It closed the year that I began kindergarten, so I was in the first class to complete all of the grades of the new consolidated school. The last time I was home, the old schoolhouse was still there, although now on private property. When I was a child, it was still used off and on for community events and it was left unlocked, so I've played in it several times. My dad's initials were carved into the front porch, as he came to the country from Sweden when he was four, and attended school there.
     
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    Last edited: Jun 8, 2015
  8. Jorge Ruiz

    Jorge Ruiz Member
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    Now that's a pity, Ken. I would have loved to attend a one-roomed school experience. The closest I got to it was actually living in a one-room school house the first three years of my life (don't remember much about it, a wood floor is about it, and that there was a storm cellar, but perhaps that's learned memory from my mum talking about the place).

    Oh yes, the "consolidated school", that was my educational experience.... forty minutes school bus ride to school every morning, class from nine to three, forty minutes back home, homework after the chores were done. Kids from all over the countryside and about. Friends you only saw at school (I lived in the middle of a corn field!), activities that only the town kids participated in. School was something we did for several hours a day. There was a lot more home life than school life.

    High school hell kind of changed that. Lived in town. Could be on the school senate, in the drama club, go to school games and cheer the team, be involved. I didn't mind the change, what I grew up with for the first ten years of my life would not have been sufficient for what I was to become later on.

    peace,
    revel.
     
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  9. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
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    And Christopher Columbus never set foot on any part of what is now the United States.
     
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  10. Martin Alonzo

    Martin Alonzo Very Well-Known Member
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    I know but history is written by the people in power and at that time it was Europe so they could say anything they wanted. I live about 6 miles from where Christopher Columbus first landed and the village I live in is named after the captain of the Pinta- Martin Alonso Pinzon. But here is another demonstration of education the village is miss named because it is Martin Alonzo.
     
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  11. Jennifer Graves

    Jennifer Graves Active Member
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    I'm not sure, but I think the schools around here spend their time teaching game hacking, how to get high off of bed bugs, and text message short hand. I haven't seen any evidence of any other type of studies.
     
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