Do You Use Any Old Fashioned Slang Or Phrases?

Discussion in 'Evolution of Language' started by Kevin Matthew, Feb 5, 2015.

  1. Richard Paradon

    Richard Paradon Well-Known Member
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    Same thing with fashion, John! When my son was about 15, I bought a pair of corduroy pants and was chastised daily by him. A few weeks later, he had a pair and when I questioned him, he just shook his head and told me that on him, they were fashionable! Now he is forty and getting the same from his kids!
     
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  2. Richard Paradon

    Richard Paradon Well-Known Member
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    I just remembered a couple from when I worked on the railroad. "Taking Beans" meant going to lunch and "Pulling the pin" meant retirement, quitting or dying.
     
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  3. Michelle Keiser

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    Whenever someone would promise me something when I was a little girl I would say "I pinky promise"...and wrap my pinky around their pinky and say it again..."I pinky promise". That to me was the ultimate promise and you did not break that promise. Gee, that was so long ago...well so it seems...but to this day if I promise one of my grandchildren something I will do the "I pinky promise" with them...and I hope that they do the same to others. In fact, while I was dealing with a woman about getting my new puppy she lives about 4 hours away from where I live. She said she had concerns that she would hold the puppy for me and I wouldn't show. I guess I don't blame her for thinking that way because she" don't know me from adam" (another saying but I am not sure where I picked it up from...my parents I think) but I tried to reassure her that if I said I would be somewhere or do something, I was a woman of my word, and I said I "pinky promise'. I looked at my text before sending it to make sure I spelled everything right and I came to that and thought gosh, that lady probably will think I am a bit strange saying that but you know...I left it, because she was an elderly woman whom I am sure has heard the expression. After that email to her she wrote back asking if she could call me and the puppy was mine. I also use "never say never" a lot! I think the reason I do that one is because it always seem to me as soon as you say something can't happen, IT DOES! So, to be on the safe side, I always say "never say never." especially raising 4 children because just when you say "oh, my child would never do that".....BAMMMM they do it!! So, I learned that pretty fast raising kids! My favorite however will always be "I pinky promise".......
     
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  4. Lydia Williams

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    Interesting story. :) I love the expression "never say never" because I like being optimistic about things.

    I think that the pinkie promise is more of an american saying, we don't usually call little fingers pinkies even, here. I'd certainly never heard of it until my daughter started using it with me - she said she'd known it for ages from American television shows. We do it all the time now though, LOL. :) It's quite fun, actually. I'm worried other people won't know what I'm on about if I try to do it with them though.
     
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  5. Richard Paradon

    Richard Paradon Well-Known Member
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    @Michelle Keiser @Lydia Williams This so funny! I never even heard of the "pinky promise" in the States, but here In Thailand it is used between friends quite often, but mostly in jest such as "I will buy you a new motorbike for you birthday!"
     
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  6. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    I tend to use (very) old-fashioned slang in an ironic context, though the word or phrase tends to vary according to time and taste. For example, 'Egad!" and 'Gadzooks!' are quite popular in our house right now.
     
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  7. Dave Sun

    Dave Sun Well-Known Member
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    My grandpa use to say, much obliged instead of thank you. I find myself saying this once in awhile. Another old saying I picked up from him, whenever he hurt himself was, geezers murphy. I have no idea how it helped but I guess it was better than cussing which I am guilty of. :rolleyes:
     
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  8. John Donovan

    John Donovan Active Member
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    Haha, well, I guess we did the same with our parents when we were young. I remember mocking my father for almost everything I could, but only jokingly, and he would mock me too for almost the same stuff. We had a really special relationship. :)
     
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  9. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    Yesterday, I heard someone say, "I like the cut of his jib". Now, there's an expression I hadn't heard in a long time.
     
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  10. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    I am not sure what made it come to my mind; but one of the phrases we used to use (a lot) as kids , and I haven't heard "in a coon's age" (there's another one !) , was the phrase "Indian Giver" .
    This was used when someone gave you something and then wanted it back.
    Most often, I remember it happening with a comic book. Someone loaned their comic book to another kid to read, expecting to get it back after it was read. However, the second kid thought that since the first one had already read the comic book, it was now his, and then he would cry "Indian-giver ! " when the first kid wanted his comic book back again.
    I haven't heard anyone use that term for many years, probably not since I actually WAS a kid myself, and I am sure that now it would not be politically correct to say it anyway.
    The more politically correct term of "Native American Giver" just doesn't seem to have the same ring to it......
     
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  11. Val White

    Val White Active Member
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    I still curl up laughing when I hear someone described as 'all fur coat and no knickers'

    It conjures up memories of my Mother delicately trying to describe a prostitute without actually saying what a prostitute was...or did
     
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  12. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
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    I remember my granddad "recollecting" instead of remembering.
     
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  13. Ina I. Wonder

    Ina I. Wonder Very Well-Known Member
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    Ok, my turn.
    1. That's a sure nough dewzy if I ever saw one.
    2. Don't get your panties in a twist.
    3. Cuttin a rug. (dancing)
    4. Gettin to big for your britches.
    5. He is two faced.

    I started a phrase in my family that is now being said to my great-granddaughter. It is, " I will lower your ears to your ankles in three seconds if your not moving in two."
     
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  14. Richard Paradon

    Richard Paradon Well-Known Member
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    Now that is too funny, Val! I was watching an old crime movie from the 40's last night and there were a few of those girls around! One of the cops arrested a guy and told him "I'm holding your for a material witness." All I could think of was, OK, did he see wool, cotton, silk?
     
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  15. Val White

    Val White Active Member
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    Which brings us to another phrase. There are none so blind as them that cannot see [​IMG]
     
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  16. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    Holy Moley! ....and I'm as fine as frog hair!
     
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