Disintegration Of Language

Discussion in 'Evolution of Language' started by Hal Pollner, Aug 28, 2018.

  1. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
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    Over the past few years, first Kids, and now Adults are substituting the word "Go" or "Goes" for the word "Say", or "Says".

    Example:

    I said "How much do you want for it?" and he says"$250."

    Now it's:

    I go "How much do you want for it?" and he goes "$250"

    Now everyone, even newscasters are saying "24/7" instead of 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

    I prefer the traditional usage of words.

    Hal
     
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  2. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    When I hear kids doing something like that, I'm not too concerned because kids have long wanted to invent their own language. Some of the words we may have used in our youth made it into the dictionary, but most didn't. What bothers me to no end is what passes for grammar in the media today.

    One that comes to mind is the use of the word "literally." Repeatedly, someone in the media will use the word "literally," and then follow it up with something that isn't literal at all, and often not even literate. I think it was Hannity, referring to something that he had heard on CNN, who said that he "literally wanted to die" when he heard that. Really? Does he often have thoughts of suicide?

    However, while I also prefer the traditional use of words, I see 24/7 as simply a shortcut that is understood by everyone, so that doesn't concern me.
     
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  3. Joe Riley

    Joe Riley Veteran Member
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    I could be wrong, but I suspect if we could travel back in time to listen to our Grandparents or Great Grandparents converse, we would find their speech stilted and hard to understand.

    [​IMG]
     
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  4. Beatrice Taylor

    Beatrice Taylor Very Well-Known Member
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    I'm fine with average people using any form of language, grammar, punctuation that will allow them to communicate and get their point across.

    I do not think that it is appropriate for people that make their living communicating with us to take those same liberties when speaking or writing.
     
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  5. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Very Well-Known Member
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    Spoken "weirdness" doesn't bother nearly as much as written. As @Beatrice Taylor mentioned, the professional speakers should be held to a higher standard than those of us who do not talk for a living. Written grammatical errors (and spelling) drive me crazy, though, even though I may make a few of those errors myself.
     
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  6. Jim Nash

    Jim Nash Active Member
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    Sometimes I feel disintegration or overhaul of the English language is long overdue. When you criticise the use of big long words, defenders jump in with the beauty of words like intransigent (obstinate.) My limited knowledge of the meanings of so many biggies spoil enjoyment of reading for me as I have to refer to the dictionary so many times.
    Grammar is another difficulty, shared by little people who logically refer to more than one sheep as sheeps. One more gripe is the commercial use of words. You don't transport corn flakes now, they driven in logistics lorries. One posh preserve is sold by The Provinder Company, which originally meant animal feed.
     
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  7. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    @Jim Nash
    As a technical school graduate (Associate of Applied Science, Electronics Technology), i was required to take a quarter of "Technical English"; this was aimed at preparing us to both write, and read, the technical verbosity common to instructional literature. Only the "strongest" verb formations were allowed, nothing intransitive, full descriptive language at all times.

    That style of writing has followed me, and occasionally plagued me, throughout my lifetime. When asked about some of my peculiar writing traits, I simply tell them I learned English in Wisconsin!
    Frank
     
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  8. Michelle Anderson

    Michelle Anderson Very Well-Known Member
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    Then we have role models like Maxine Waters, who is proud of her oft-quoted command to her followers, “Stay woke!”
     
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  9. Jim Nash

    Jim Nash Active Member
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    Television helps to remove strong accents and localised oddities. When I moved up to Newcastle, people from Gateshead always finished sentences with (But) plus slang words filled conversations and endearingly every one was, (Pet.)
    Now the geordie accent is dying, everybody walks round tied to their phones and communicate in funny ways. This is called evolution.
     
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  10. Mikhail Bulgakov

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    My experience was different Frank. I was twice employed as a copy writer, and it was not "verbosity", i.e. the use of too many words, wordiness, that was encouraged when writing copy, where I worked anyway. On the contrary, we were taught to shorten and simplify as much as possible, especially when writing directions or instruction. That's why you don't see the "articles": "a, and, and the" in directions in putting together your "assembly required" kitchen cabinet. The instruction clarity definitely varies, and many an instruction has ended up cursed and crumpled on the living room floor, .
     
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  11. Mikhail Bulgakov

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    From a recent movie, a buzz-cut kid on a motorcycle talking to a regular adult. I paraphrase.

    "And then we're going to take the bus from there, you know what I mean? And if the bus isn't on time, I don't know what we'll do, you know what I mean? But, we'll get there, because I'm all about showing up, you know what I mean?" . . .

    The listener responds: "Yes, I woke up this morning, and I speak English, so I know what you mean."
     
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  12. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
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    Some people say "AX" when they mean to say "ASK".

    "I didn't know the directions, so I AXED him."

    "I don't know if we can make it...let me AX the wife."

    I really don't want anyone to ax me!

    I find this supercalifragilisticexpealidocious!

    Harry
     
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    Last edited: Mar 15, 2019
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  13. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
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    It's one of my pet hates....the word is ASK...what's so hard for some people?
     
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  14. Ken N Louis

    Ken N Louis Very Well-Known Member
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    How about insulation and installation..
     
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  15. Mary Robi

    Mary Robi Well-Known Member
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    How about asterisk? A lot of people incorrectly pronounce it asterix.
     
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