City Of Los Fresnos

Discussion in 'Jobs I Have Had' started by Ken Anderson, Sep 13, 2015.

  1. Ina I. Wonder

    Ina I. Wonder Very Well-Known Member
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    I did see that @Ken Anderson . But I wondered what brought a young single man from up north to Texas. Did you have family here? A Lady? Or were you just a young man wandering the country? I also wondered what took you all the way to Maine? The two locations are as different as night and day.
     
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  2. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    I had been in Southern California for several years before moving to Texas. I knew no one there, but was recruited for the job.
     
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  3. K E Gordon

    K E Gordon Very Well-Known Member
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    I have a cousin who lives in Fresno California, i thought this post was going to be about Fresno California, but it was very interesting, I am glad I read it. I think driving or working on a ambulance would get your adrelanin pumping. I think the people who are rescuers are very brave and level headed as well, Kudos to anyone who does that.
     
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  4. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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  5. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    We were called to a home on Christmas Eve for a child with a fish hook "impaled" in his thumb. When we arrived, everyone was excited. The parents were scared, and the kid was crying. His brother had gotten a fishing pole for Christmas and apparently tried a cast in the living room and caught his little brother. Okay, so no one is going to die here. The truly odd thing is that the pole was propped up against one end of the couch, and the kid with the fishing hook in his thumb was at the other end of the couch, but the line was pulled tight as if someone was reeling him in. I stood there for a second, trying to figure out what it was that I wasn't understanding.

    Had someone moved the pole closer to the kid or the kid closer to the pole or cut the line if they really couldn't figure it out, the tension would be off the line. I chose option A. Once I moved the pole closer to the child, the tension was off the line and the hook nearly fell out of his thumb. It had stuck his thumb but not to the barb. All he needed was a Bandaid and would have survived even without that, but kids like Bandaids.

    There were at least eight people in the house, including three adults, and no one could figure out that if you accidentally hook a kid on a fishing line, don't try to reel him in.
     
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  6. Bill Boggs

    Bill Boggs Veteran Member
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    Well, I'll say this for you up, above these being interesting stories, You've got more hats than a Texas Country/ Western Store.
     
    #21
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  7. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Very Well-Known Member
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    Your story of the kid reminded me of one. At one time we managed a veterinary clinic in rural Alaska. We got an emergency call one night about a dog who had bitten a halibut hook and couldn't get off. We met the folks at the clinic, and there was a Labrador Retriever with a commercial (stainless steel) giant halibut hook completely through his lower jaw bone. I guess the hook had bait on it at one time and the dog thought it smelled good enough to eat. Anyway, since it was thick stainless steel, we had absolutely nothing at the clinic that would cut off the barb. I believe I found a file or hacksaw blade that I used to notch the hook so I could manage to break off the bard and remove the hook. We had to sedate the dag of course, and put it on significant antibiotics to prevent osteomyelitis. The dog ended up just fine.
     
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  8. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    I could have been wealthier if I had stuck with one thing, I suppose, but I would get bored doing the same thing for too many years. Come to think of it, that's probably why I have moved to different parts of the country, too.
     
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  9. Bill Boggs

    Bill Boggs Veteran Member
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    I understand workplace boredom. Why I changed jobs so often.
     
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  10. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
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    One winter, in the late 1980s, we had a hard freeze in the Rio Grande Valley. That was the first freeze they had experienced in more than 20 years so they weren't at all prepared for it (since then, they have had one in 2010 and again this year - so much for global warming). Aside from all my water pipes breaking, we had a fun time. For two days, the roads were completely iced over, including the freeway. They had no stockpiles of salt or sand.

    Combined with the fact that no one there knew how to drive on ice, we had one accident after another. We had only two ambulances in Los Fresnos and, since everyone else was busy too, we couldn't depend on getting backup from anyone. We literally went from one motor vehicle accident to another. By the time we got to the hospital with one set of patients, we knew where our next call was because they were backed up. We had plenty of equipment, just not enough ambulances to transport everyone immediately. There were even times when we would stop at a second wreck while transporting a patient from another wreck, and then we'd have to explain to the hospital staff that they came from two unrelated scenes.

    Fortunately, the fire department was very well trained, certified in EMS, and knew what we needed and where it could be found, so by the time we got to a scene, the fire department had the patients all ready to go, including all the information we needed. Plus, we had certified volunteers who'd help at the scene, or triage people who did not want to be transported. We had scene times of one minute or two minutes. With no time to eat, we'd be grabbing candy bars from the vending machines at the hospital.

    We literally had both of our ambulances out on calls for about 48 hours. Sometimes, we'd trade out crews at the scene of an accident so someone could get a meal or some sleep.

    Coming back from the hospital, I exited the freeway and could see that someone exiting from the other direction was going too fast to make the stop, so I pulled over and watched. He slid on through the stop sign, hit another car that was approaching the freeway, and they both slid into a couple of other cars. That made for a great response time as we were on the scene before the accident occurred.

    Mostly, MVA's don't require a lot of thinking. The trauma is usually pretty obvious and treatment is straight-forward. However, we were called to see a woman who had hit a house. She hit it hard enough to break through the brick wall. At first, we thought she had slid off the road and struck the house. She was unconscious so I couldn't ask but the accident wasn't making sense, given that her car had gone up the driveway before hitting the house, and someone who was unable to slow down in order to turn into the driveway would have missed the drive, yet someone who had turned in the drive shouldn't have been going fast enough to hit the house with such force. Then I learned that it was her house.

    Compounding the confusion was that, despite it being a hard hit, she was belted in, and the car seemed to have absorbed the impact better than her house did. It seemed odd that she would be completely unconscious, as she was, so I guessed that she was probably suffering from a medical condition. I was thinking diabetes since that could lead to confusion and even unconsciousness, but her blood sugar levels were fine.

    As it turned out, she had suffered a stroke. She somehow managed to turn into her driveway but then she hit the gas rather than the brake and was probably unconscious before she hit the house. There was very little trauma involved.
     
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