Canning

Discussion in 'Crops & Gardens' started by Sheldon Scott, Jun 22, 2016.

  1. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2,337
    Likes Received:
    3,482
    We've been canning dill pickles and green beans. Sweet pickles will be next, Didn't can asparagus this year but put 4 pounds in the freezer. Wife wants to can some kale soon too. Peppers later.
     
    #1
  2. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2015
    Messages:
    15,026
    Likes Received:
    13,773
    When you say can, do you mean in Mason jars? Do you do everything the same way, even the kale
    or different ways depending on the veggie?
     
    #2
  3. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2016
    Messages:
    5,414
    Likes Received:
    6,885
    Sounds like y'all are having a good yield from your garden @Sheldon Scott :)
     
    #3
    Sheldon Scott likes this.
  4. Texas Beth

    Texas Beth Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    May 28, 2016
    Messages:
    568
    Likes Received:
    492
    Good job putting 4 pounds in the freezer. My garden started off with a bank this year, but ended in a whimper. I am so disappointed.
     
    #4
  5. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    3,843
    Likes Received:
    3,431
    I am interested in "Freeze-drying" as a means of canning. I have used freeze-dried Raspberries, and they were amazing! Shelf life 30 years, no need for refrigeration, or boiling and cooking. A company now makes a home-sized unit. Commercial units are quite expensive, ~ $30,000. The home unit is about $2000. Lot of money, yes. Results worth it? I think yes. But I can't spare a frivolous $2000 now; my car ain't running! Frank
     
    #5
    Joe Riley likes this.
  6. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2,337
    Likes Received:
    3,482
    Yes to the mason jars. Everything is different. Some things such as pickles can be done in a boiling water canner, most vegetables must be canned in a pressure canner.
     
    #6
    Joe Riley and Chrissy Cross like this.
  7. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2,337
    Likes Received:
    3,482
    Sorry to hear @Texas Beth, We didn't plant as much this year but most of it has done really well.
     
    #7
  8. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2,337
    Likes Received:
    3,482
    Canned our third batch of sweet pickles yesterday. That should be plenty. I reckon I'll start taking excess cucumbers to town.
    I thought I was through picking blackberries but I'm thinking about going this morning to see if there are any left.
     
    #8
  9. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    3,843
    Likes Received:
    3,431
    @Sheldon Scott Our place in MO had Blackberries growing wild all over the place. One stand of them covered about 5 acres. Unfortunately, during our years there for the most part, the weather was haywire, plenty of rain in Spring to get things going, but then weeks on end in June with none. Bad for berries. One year, though, my wife picked about 20 gallons! There was also Raspberries, but far fewer.
     
    #9
    Sheldon Scott likes this.
  10. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2015
    Messages:
    15,026
    Likes Received:
    13,773
    Did ya make wine?
     
    #10
    Sheldon Scott and Frank Sanoica like this.
  11. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2015
    Messages:
    2,906
    Likes Received:
    2,419
    We sometimes have a surplus from our garden but mostly fruits and not much of vegetables - we plant just a few vegetables that is budgeted for our needs. When we harvested the banana with 12 clusters, with each cluster having a minimum of 20 bananas, our neighbors were going bananas when we distributed their share. With mangoes, we pickle the excess harvest that is given to my colleagues in the office, they just love pickled mangoes. Maybe if we know the canning process then we can make preserved fruits. Right now we have plenty of star fruit that we also give away because of the excess. And I have noticed the dragon fruit with the buds and some flowers already.

    I have heard of a canning machine but I still have to research on the cost and also how to use it.
     
    #11
  12. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2015
    Messages:
    15,026
    Likes Received:
    13,773
    Never had pickled mango. I do like dried mango, especially the ones Costco sells. A little sugary but oh so good.

    Star fruit isn't always in stores here. I needed a star fruit one Christmas because I was doing a appetizer Christmas tree and the top was a slice of star fruit. Went to all the stores, nobody had it. :(
     
    #12
    Krissttina Isobe likes this.
  13. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    3,843
    Likes Received:
    3,431
    @Chrissy Page Ha! Did I ever!!
     
    #13
    Sheldon Scott and Chrissy Cross like this.
  14. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2015
    Messages:
    15,026
    Likes Received:
    13,773
    Ha ha....I knew it!
     
    #14
  15. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    3,843
    Likes Received:
    3,431
    #15
    Sheldon Scott likes this.
  16. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2015
    Messages:
    4,590
    Likes Received:
    4,020
    I've always wanted to can, but now that I have the time, I definitely don't have the room. It's probably just as well, because I might end up with botulism. I tried making a batch of Vietnamese salty lemonade and think I misunderstood 'cover loosely', they ended up all moldy. Freeze drying sounds interesting, but that's way out of my price range, although if I had the money I'd probably spring for it.
     
    #16
  17. K E Gordon

    K E Gordon Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2016
    Messages:
    1,443
    Likes Received:
    1,374
    When I was kid we used to can corn. My grandparents had a farm and there was always a huge yield of corn. My sisters my mom, my grandmother and I would spend a day canning corn. Everybody had a job. I think that canned corn would last us through the winter. I have had gardens here but never had enough veggies to can. It can be a real money saver though for sure.
     
    #17
  18. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    4,829
    Likes Received:
    6,959
    When I was kid, my family used to can all kinds of things to eat during the winter. We had fruit trees, grape vines, and berry bushes, and Grandma Bailey would can all of these things, making lots of grape jam, raspberry jam, and apple buter.
    When we went fishing and caught more than we could fry and eat, she canned the trout, which was almost like eating canned salmon, with its delicious pink meat.
    They lived nest door to us, and we all shared the food and the cellar where we stored all of that canned food.
    Apples, potatoes, and carrots were also stored in the root cellar over the winter.
    It was a good way to live.
    The only thing that I have ever canned was some relish, and sometimes I make that easy freezer jam.
    We seldom eat jam now; so I have stopped making it, too.
     
    #18
    Krissttina Isobe likes this.
  19. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    4,829
    Likes Received:
    6,959
    Do you ever do any of the pickling that is done like making sauerkraut, @Sheldon Scott ? I have watched tutorials on this kind of pickling; but have been afraid to even try it.
    I think it is because I have these visions of it exploding and pickles or saurkaut shreds (even worse !) flying all over the kitchen and sticking to the ceiling.
    I just watched this tutorial on making radish pickles, and it seems to me like they would probably taste delicious; so I am wavering back and forth (in my mind, of course) whether I should try making some or not.
    What is your expert opinion, Sheldon (or anyone else here); have you ever made pickles this way, and how easy/hard was it to make them (and did they explode) ? ?

     
    #19
    Krissttina Isobe likes this.
  20. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2,337
    Likes Received:
    3,482
    No @Yvonne Smith , we make kraut but have never made fermented pickles. I don't know about radish pickles but my wife made pickles from yellow squash and they were great.
     
    #20
    Yvonne Smith likes this.
  21. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2,337
    Likes Received:
    3,482
    I canned some Bread & Butter pickles yesterday; 7 pints. I hope that's all the pickles although we're still getting loads of cucumbers.
    We're getting ripe tomatoes and sweet peppers now. We'll probably can tomatoes soon.
     
    #21
    Krissttina Isobe likes this.
  22. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    7,458
    Likes Received:
    9,815
    I have never canned anything, other than making preserves or jellies, but I'd like to have the ability to do that so that we can take advantage of bulk sales or buying things when they are available, then canning them for later use. I have been tempted to try it myself but, to be honest, if I figure out how to do it, this will become my job and I have too many jobs, so I've been trying to encourage my wife to do that. Hey, it's not a sexist thing, since I am generally the one who does dishes and laundry.
     
    #22
    Sheldon Scott likes this.
  23. Mari North

    Mari North Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2016
    Messages:
    1,288
    Likes Received:
    2,177
    I've always wanted to do canning... never did it, though. My mom always canned tomatoes.... crushed for things like chili, and they were so good in soups and various recipes.

    My grandma had a whole wall of shelves in the basement for rows and rows of colorful canned goods. She canned all kinds of things but my favorite was the peaches and pears. Oh, they were so good and sweet. There was never the horrified screaming of "You can't eat that much sugar, it will ruin your health!" People just ate things like that without much of a second thought.

    I did can peaches with my sister one year... and it was a good time. Let's see... memories. I guess my favorite is listening for those lids to pop every time I was in the house where canning was going on. My mom, grandma, and aunt somehow subconsciously counted and always knew how many of them hadn't sealed yet. :)

    I would dearly love to have a shelf like my grandma had... if I'd have the space for it, (I don't :( ) it would definitely be the prompt I'd need to learn how to do it. Sometimes I buy home canned things from the dear Amish and Mennonites I've always had in my area, but the prices are rather steep because of the labor and costs of the jars, etc. I can't do a lot of that.
     
    #23
  24. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2,337
    Likes Received:
    3,482
    I guess it's just regional, but I thought most people in our age bracket grew up with gardening and canning as a way of life. Not so many young people doing it but we've sold some excess jars a few times and it was younger people ( 20's I'd guess) who bought them.
     
    #24
  25. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    3,843
    Likes Received:
    3,431
    Here's what I know for certain, as well as what I don't know. Vegetables which are acidic, naturally, or made so using vinegar, "can" rather easily with little negative aftereffect. Sweet fruits are trickier, and meat is the "snake". All this is according to my wife! Don't quote me!

    She canned veggies she grew in Phoenix, and Missouri later. he used a "boiling water batch", Mason Jars with screw-top lids having a big center hole with a rim to bear down upon the convexed lids, which had a rubbery seal underneath, sealing on the rim of the jar. She boiled the empty jars, submerged in water in a big kettle, removed them while hot, and filled them with the veggies she had already cooked (maybe not always pre-cooked, though), then tightened the lids and caps, put the filled jars back in the kettle, submerged underwater, then boiled them until the contents of the jars could be seen to boil! I told her she was nuts! That the jars would burst! They didn't! Removed from the kettle, as they sat on the countertop, the lids one by one "popped" downwards, to become concaved. This indicated a vacuum was present in the jars. When they were cool, she did the next wacko thing: she removed the screwed down rings! Now you had only the vacuum maintaining the "seal"

    After I thought about her process a long time, I decided one of two things was happening: she either lucked out, that none ever burst, or the lids were able to vent steam pressure even while screwed down.

    Then, there is something called a "Pressure Canner". This I don't know even Jack Spratt about, but imagine it to be a Pressure Cooker, basically. Used to safely can meats, I believe. @Sheldon Scott being in Arkansas, where a multitude of folks grown and preserve their own foods, may be able to straighten me out a bit about my lack of "can" skills!
    Frank
     
    #25

Share This Page