British Slang Phrases

Discussion in 'Evolution of Language' started by Hal Pollner, Jun 26, 2018.

  1. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
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    I've always found this one interesting:

    When a Brit plans a date with a girl, he'll tell her he'll pick her up at a certain time by saying:

    "I'll knock you up at eight."

    This has a completely different meaning in the USA, as you know!

    Hal
     
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  2. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    Same meaning over here Hal - and no one ever said that to me :p
     
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  3. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Fanny also means something else there.
     
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  4. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    Does it - don't be so sure :p
     
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  5. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    I thought it did. :)

    Fanny is your derrière here...
     
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  6. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    Its yer bum bum here too ! :p
     
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  7. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    I thought it was something else.....
     
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  8. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    Oh yea ……….? …………………. No ……………….. :p
    Not from my part of London anyway
     
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  9. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Ok...so it's not your vajayjay? :)

    A fanny pak is a purse that goes around your waist...

    Going out to TJs now before I get in trouble. :)
     
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  10. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    We call that a 'bum bag' - awful things they are

    Never heard that vajayjay before ( so pleased about that ) I'm such an innocent in these matters
     
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  11. Chrissy Cross

    Chrissy Cross Veteran Member
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    Haha....I don't think we use "bum" so much, use butt more at least around here.
     
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  12. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    Ah yes - 'butt bag' :p
     
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  13. Thomas Stearn

    Thomas Stearn Well-Known Member
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    Very informative. ;)Just keep going. There seem to be a lot of words I can pick up. Not innocent, though.:p
     
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  14. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
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    What about "Your Arse"?

    Hal
     
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  15. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    What about it - that's a crude word in my book
     
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  16. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    "Ahsk it? Ahsk it??

    I Cohmahnd it!

    Richard Burton in "Where Eagles Dare".

    Frank
     
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  17. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
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    That's not a slang phrase, Frank...that's an Accent.

    Hal
     
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  18. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
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    @Hal Pollner
    Well then how about "gudgeon"?
    Frank
     
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  19. Hal Pollner

    Hal Pollner Very Well-Known Member
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    I'm not familiar with the word, except how it works together with the pintle.

    Hal
     
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  20. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    I’m just trying to get past all the terms used in cricket. After I have a firm grasp on those, maybe someday I’ll start worrying about all the rest of the stuff but it looks like that’ll be a while.
     
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  21. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    @Bobby Cole - don't concern yerself with Cricket Bobby, you'll pass out with boredom :rolleyes:
    Its hardly baseball ! :p
     
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  22. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    Very true because when I first started perusing the list of cricket terms I believe I fell asleep somewhere between Bail and Bat Pad. :)

    There is, however, one term in Cricket that is very common below the Mason-Dixon line in the U.S.: Howzat or Howzee in cricket is when the bowler or fielder asks the ump for his opinion and simply means "how is it" in relation to the wicket. In the south, it seems that nearly everyone uses that same jargon for anything and at any time.
     
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  23. Gloria Mitchell

    Gloria Mitchell Very Well-Known Member
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    Bullocks:cool:
     
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  24. Patsy Faye

    Patsy Faye Veteran Member
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    @Bobby Cole - yea and the la de da toffs have a habit of saying 'Its not cricket ol chap' :rolleyes: (when you say something that irks them)
    Well that's good I thinks - anything but cricket ! :p
     
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  25. Bobby Cole

    Bobby Cole Veteran Member
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    To go along with @Ken Anderson’s observation concerning the British and the use of too many vowels, the slang “bloody” is used in the stead of uh....”da_n”. It’s seems so much simpler to say the four letter version rather than the six.
    But then, as I observed when I was a young lad, perhaps if my now departed pentecostal grandmother had said bloody in the stead of it’s American version, she wouldn’t have retired to her prayer closet so much asking for forgiveness. Since I was a definite chore when I visited, she spent an awful lot of time in that closet! Ah, the memories.........

    That said, I do often fight the vowel syndrome by using the Elizabethian term of “whilst” rather than “while”. One less vowel but one more consonant.
     
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