Bone Broth For Your Joint Pain, And Gut Health.

Discussion in 'Diets & Dieting' started by Yvonne Smith, Nov 15, 2016.

  1. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    Last year, @Lara Moss was telling us about making bone broth to drink for extra vitamins and minerals, plus collagen and gelatin to help joints. I had never even heard of it when Lara mentioned it, but now I am trying some.
    Bone broth has a lot of glucosamine and chrondoitin , which are the main things that we buy as joint supplements. But it also helps stop things like leaky gut, which would seem to be totally unrelated to joint pain.
    I have been listening to the fat summit speakers, and one of them was Dr. Kellyann Petrucci, who has written a book about the benefits of bone broth. I am including one of her talks, which looks like it is similar to the one I listened to yesterday. It is a long one, but very informative.
    After listening to the lecture, I decided to make bone broth last night, so we got some chicken, and I cooked it in the Ninja, had most of the chicken meat for dinner, and then left the bones and veggies to simmer all night long.
    This morning, I added some pumpkin to give it extra body and vitamins, and I didn't strain mine because I like the thick richness of all of the veggies in the broth.

    Since I am on the low-carb diet, and it is very cold here now, I needed something HOT that I can eat that is still low-carb, and this looks like it will fill the ticket, plus all of the other benefits.

     
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  2. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
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    Yvonne . this definitely sounds like something I need...and as I cook home made soup a lot, (without bones)..I know I'd like it., but when you say you left the bones to simmer all night long...how did you do that?..I mean, how would I do that?...do you put it in a slow cooker? I'd be scared to leave something on the stove.
     
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  3. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    Most of the information said to use a crockpot, but some people make it in a pressure cooker, and then it only takes about 3 hours of cooking. We have one of the Ninja Cooking Systems, which is like a glorified crockpot. It is a slow cooker like a crockpot, but with variable temp settings, so you can roast or bake things as well.
    Anyway, after watching the video, and seeing all of the benefits, we got some chicken wings to try. Since they have lots of joints, and not much meat, it seemed like a good choice. After it had cook a while last night, we ate most of the meat, but there was still some in the broth. I added carrots, celery, onion, and some greens, plus a bay leaf and seasonings, lots of water, and just left it on low heat to simmer all night long.
    You are supposed to strain the broth, and then drink the liquid, but since I like the veggies in the broth, I didn't strain mine, so it is somewhere between a rich broth and a soup.
    I read that you can cook it for up to two days, so it is still in the Ninja on low, and I will drink some during the day, and then cool it and put it in the refrigerator in a jar to have some each day.
    I added just a dab of vinegar, and you can't taste that at all, and I also put in a tsp of cayenne to make it spicier, and because that is also a pain-killer.
    Here is what my first cup of it looks like. I had this for breakfast, and it was hot, delicious, and filled me up.
    IMG_0387.JPG
     
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  4. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
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    Well I'd definitely going to try that Yvonne. I usually make soup on the stove which only takes an hour ..but without a carcass..just the meat and veggies.....so when I get a couple of days off work, I'll try this version of yours with chicken wings. Does it matter what meat you use?...does it have to be chicken?

    I haven't watched the video yet, but I will
     
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  5. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    Actually, it looks like you can use just about anything that has bones, even fish, @Holly Saunders .
    There are some free books about bone broth on the Kindle store, too. I found one yesterday and it was almost the same idea of meat and veggies cooked for hours and hours to leach out all of the nutritious goodies from both the bones and the veggies.
    One of the recommended things is knuckle bones, which can be beef, pork, lamb, or just about any of the large meat animals. I am going to try some ox-tail next, and see how that comes out.
    Pretty much, you can add whatever vegetables you like, and then either strain it or not, as you prefer.

    The video is a long one, and has a lot of worthwhile information; but there are a lot of shorter tutorials on youtube if you just want to see how to make the broth. I like to know why something is beneficial , and the long video is perfect for explaining that part.
     
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  6. Holly Saunders

    Holly Saunders Veteran Member
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    I made Ox tail in the slow cooker a few months ago Yvonne,,,it came out verrry thick..and very strong tasting. I like Oxtail, but even for me that was way too strong a taste. Perhaps I should put much more water in it..

    I think Lamb ( my favourite meat) would be tasty but very fatty.. I might try a beef knuckle bone as well.

    Anyway thanks for the tip about the shorter tutorials, I'll definitely 'bone' (excuse the pun):D up on them..
     
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