Any Fans Of Edgar Allen Poe?

Discussion in 'Reading & Writing' started by Magalina Lilis, Sep 1, 2015.

  1. Magalina Lilis

    Magalina Lilis Active Member
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    I was at a garage sale the other day and chanced upon a book about Edgar Allen Poe, The Man Behind the Legend. Although I have only skimmed the pages, I look forward to sitting down and reading it in its entirety..

    Seeings that I am Richmond VA right now, I thought it would be fun and give more depth to the book, if I go and visit some of Poe's landmarks in town. First on my list will be the museum and then walk the ground of the publishing company that he worked for in days past. Think I will go visit the grave-site of his mother, too. Legend has it he spent many hours here.

    When I get done reading this book on Poe, I just might wander up for a quick trip to NYC to catch the The New York State Ballet. As I just read an article, there will be performance on 26 SEP featuring “The Masque of the Red Death,” “The Cask of Amontillado” and “The Raven”.

    Thus brings me to my question, any other fans of Edgar Allen Poe?
     
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  2. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Very Well-Known Member
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    YES. I am a fan. I have a book of all his writings and have read most of them, several more than once.
     
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  3. Corie Henson

    Corie Henson Very Well-Known Member
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    I am not really a fan of Edgar Allan Poe but his poems are popular in high schools here. The Raven is one of Poe's masterpieces that is a sad one with a tinge of suspense and horror. Another poem that I partly remember is Annabel Lee. Our teacher would be reading Annabel Lee with her accent and pauses that gave excitement to her class. But admittedly, we were excited not really with the poem but with our teacher's style of reciting the poem. Now you can imagine when our teacher recited Nevermore.
     
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  4. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    When I was a teenager I had an old book (or maybe it was a set, I can't remember anymore) and it was printed in the early 1900's . I loved reading all of those stories, and read them over and over.
    I liked them all, and the "Murders in the Rue Morgue" was one of my favorites.
    I have never been big on poetry, but I did like "The Raven" and of course the sad story of Annabel Lee.
     
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  5. Brittany Houser

    Brittany Houser Well-Known Member
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    Yes! I have always loved Poe, and his writings. My favorites are The Masque of the Red Death, and The Raven. I won't give you any spoilers Avigail, LOL, but the details of his life (and death), are very sad and interesting. He is one of those geniuses, like Van Gogh, who just tugs at my heartstrings!
     
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  6. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    I enjoy Poe's stories and it's interesting to compare his "detective" fiction with that of Wilkie Collins, most notably the latter's brilliant The Moonstone. I'm not going to sit in judgement because the two writers were very different and it would be a bit like asking whether an apple tastes better than a pear. In some ways, the pair of them led the way to the creation of the detective genre and also laid down the path for later gothic novels.

    Gothic fiction had been very much along the line of "big castle, mysterious foreign count, beautiful girl, count locks up beautiful girl in big castle and strange things happen." Poe and Collins helped to bring the gothic/sensationalist into more everyday surroundings.
     
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  7. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Very Well-Known Member
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    The Moonstone is an excellent book, and I remember reading that when I was a teenager as well. Another of Wilkie Collin's books that i enjoyed even more was called "The Lady in White".
    I actually didn't think that Wilkie Collins was similar to Edgar Allen Poe though. To me, Poe's stories were more on the macabre side than Collon's books were.
    Another writer that I thoroughly enjoyed was Daphne Du Maurier. I (of course) started out reading Rebecca, and then like it so well that I also read "Frenchman's Cove", and there was some other book by her that I liked also, and can't think what it was right now. Oh, yes, Jamaica Inn, was the other one I think.
     
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  8. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    I read - and studied - Wilkie Collins' The Woman in White as part of my degree course. It's a terrific novel, with one of the best villains anywhere in literature. Count Fosco surely inspired many a Bond villain.
     
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  9. Hannah Davis

    Hannah Davis Active Member
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    To be honest I never read any of Poe's actual stories. Oh I did read his poetry while in school, including the iconic The Raven. I have also seen a few movies based on his books, although again you have to wonder how much of these are true to the book itself. I will give Poe this credit he did make a name for himself and his works have kept him immortalized.
     
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  10. Magalina Lilis

    Magalina Lilis Active Member
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    Since you comment on the subject of Edgar Allen Poe, perhaps someday you will read some of his writings beside the Raven! :)
    As you already know, watching a movie and reading a book are two entirely different forms. Granted this does provide insight into an authors story but not so much his prose.

    Tom and Yvonne's grasp on Poe clearly shows that his influence went further then making a name for himself, immortalized (as you say). Although you have a relevant point about Poe being a type of cult figure these days, it was not the case during his lifetime or even immediately following his death. Sure, The Raven made a splash, but his persona was nothing like it is today.

    Do you enjoy this type of genre? In addition, to the already discussed topic on Wilkie Collins, Moonstone. Other authors; such as the famous Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and H.G. Wells come to mind, too.
     
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  11. Tom Locke

    Tom Locke Very Well-Known Member
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    Wells is best known for his 'futuristic' works, but he also wrote many fine contemporary novels like Kipps and The History of Mr Polly, which were quite Dickensian. There is also the semi-autobiographical Tono-Bungay, which is one of my favourites.

    Authors like Dickens, Collins and Wells addressed many of the big questions and problems facing society at that time and their works provide a wonderful window into life in the late 19th and early 20th century.
     
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