Any Big Vegetable Gardeners Here?

Discussion in 'Crops & Gardens' started by Don Alaska, Mar 11, 2018.

  1. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    470
    Likes Received:
    587
    Anyone here have one or more vegetable gardens? What are your favorite crops and varieties? We are limited as to what will grow outside here, even in the Summer. Cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, and all the root crops grow well here, but tomatoes are questionable outside. Peppers, eggplants and such don't grow here outside at all. Peas and beans do okay with the right varieties. We have large outdoor gardens, however, that we defend from the moose all Summer. We have celery, onions, leeks, peppers and tomatoes started so far. The cole/crucifers will be next, then squash, pumpkins and melons will be the last ones to start sometime around early May.
     
    #1
    Von Jones and Yvonne Smith like this.
  2. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2,512
    Likes Received:
    3,735
    I'm planting less this year. I'm not able to do as much as I'd like, but still want to have a garden. I weeded the asparagus bed Saturday, planted potatoes yesterday and will plant beets today. Everything else will have to wait for warmer weather.
     
    #2
    Von Jones likes this.
  3. Yvonne Smith

    Yvonne Smith Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    5,363
    Likes Received:
    7,899
    Warmer weather indeed....... that is the story here as well, @Sheldon Scott !
    We had those few absolutely lovely days towards the end of February and the weather was almost up to 80 here. Since then, we have had not much else except cold, rain, and even some snow.
    In fact, Bobby said it was trying to snow here in Alabama when he let Chipper out this morning at around 5ish.
    As for growing a large garden, we do not do that anymore either. One reason is that there is literally no place to grow a large garden. The whole property is surrounded by trees (huge trees !) on every side, and more of them in the yard. The overhead view of our property dies not even show the house or driveway, it just looks like a large stand of trees, at least all summer long. And of course, there is the roots of all of those trees; so you can’t even dig anywhere, let alone rototill.

    What we have been doing is mostly container gardening, and trying to set the container out where it get as much sunshine as possible. I am starting everything that we are going to grow inside, in the aerogarden, and then will move it outside once it is warm enough.
    I am also trying out passive hydroponics, using the Kratky method, and am looking forward to seeing how well this does and if I can move the plants outside once it warms up.
     
    #3
    Don Alaska likes this.
  4. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    8,668
    Likes Received:
    11,449
    I would love to have a large garden each year. However, we're restricted to growing above ground because our house and yard sits on coal ash. I do have a small garden space that I have built up with lumber and filled in with compost and soil, and I also use lawn bags for potatoes and other containers. Gardening is, I think, a little trickier in Maine than in some places because our growing season is neither long or dependable. Right now, my garden area is under about three feet of snow and we're supposed to get another large storm tomorrow. Our snow won't melt away until at least the latter part of April, and sometimes into May. On the other end, we sometimes get our first frost in September.

    So we just kind of play around with our garden, to see what we can get to grow, and how well we can get it to grow. We usually grow onions and potatoes, although I didn't do the potatoes last year.
     
    #4
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2018
    Don Alaska likes this.
  5. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    470
    Likes Received:
    587
    Sounds like your growing season is similar to ours, although we can grow things in the ground. The growing season here is about 90 days, but many crops, like sweet corn, cannot make it here even though the claimed time to maturity is less than 90 days. We gardened in raised beds here for more than a decade, but found we have fewer slugs if we garden in the ground. I would think a salad garden would be good idea anywhere.
     
    #5
    Yvonne Smith likes this.
  6. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    470
    Likes Received:
    587
    Our place was heavily forested when we moved here in 1992, but 22 years of raising goats killed a lot of tree and allowed me to clear the land. I never wanted to cut down a live tree, but dead trees didn't bother me and provided a lot of firewood over the years. We have "light shelves" set up in our heated garage, and an attached greenhouse where we start much of our stuff. We sell bedding plants in the Spring and perennials in the Fall; that pays all our expenses and allows a little profit as well.
     
    #6
    Tom Galty and Von Jones like this.
  7. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2,512
    Likes Received:
    3,735
    I picked the first few spears of asparagus yesterday. The beets and one potato are up and growing. I bought six tomato plants and one jalapeno plant yesterday but won't plant them yet.
     
    #7
    Yvonne Smith likes this.
  8. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    470
    Likes Received:
    587
    Maybe you should contact Elliot Coleman. He lives somewhere in Maine and is an expert in cold-climate gardening.
    http://fourseasonfarm.com/
     
    #8
  9. Ken Anderson

    Ken Anderson Greeter
    Moderator Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2015
    Messages:
    8,668
    Likes Received:
    11,449
    I pretty much know what I can do and what I can't do, as I grew up in a similar climate in the UP of Michigan.

    Harborside is about 120 south of me, but with a whole different landscape. I wouldn't mind living there but doubt I could afford the land prices.

    harborside.jpg
     
    #9
  10. Gloria Mitchell

    Gloria Mitchell Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2017
    Messages:
    1,597
    Likes Received:
    2,242
    I have planted some lemon seeds. A friend, planted some in a pot for window sill. So ,decided I would try it also. Very nice looking little plant
    while growing :)
     
    #10
    Yvonne Smith likes this.
  11. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2016
    Messages:
    6,718
    Likes Received:
    8,478
    My youngest daughter is busy growing another baby so we have put off starting a nice garden in her back yard and once again my Honey and I just bought one tomato plant and our former landlord and next door neighbor surprised us with a bell pepper plant last week. Now we are just hoping the birds won't eat our tomatoes like they did last year. I am going to buy some netting to put over the plant hoping that will keep the birds away.

    There are four baby tomatoes on our plant right now.

    . IMG_0040.JPG IMG_0041.JPG
     
    #11
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2018
  12. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2,512
    Likes Received:
    3,735
    I planted six 12 foot rows of purple hull peas today
     
    #12
  13. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    470
    Likes Received:
    587
    That's great, Sheldon. We still cannot get into the garden, but my wife made it to the big greenhouse yesterday for the first time since Fall. The snow has been too deep, but it is melting rapidly now. We will have to wait until the ground dries enough to till and plant, but I have a lot of plants started inside....
     
    #13
    Sheldon Scott and Yvonne Smith like this.
  14. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2016
    Messages:
    6,718
    Likes Received:
    8,478
    How nice Sheldon. Fresh cooked purple hull peas are delicious! :) We don't have the kind of yardage to plant those but if we lived near y'all I sure would see if you would sell us some. :)
     
    #14
    Sheldon Scott likes this.
  15. Sheldon Scott

    Sheldon Scott Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2015
    Messages:
    2,512
    Likes Received:
    3,735
    They aren't for sale, but if you lived near us I would give you some.
     
    #15
    Babs Hunt and Yvonne Smith like this.
  16. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2016
    Messages:
    6,718
    Likes Received:
    8,478
    IMG_0066.JPG IMG_0068.JPG
    I have 5 nice size tomatoes growing on our plant now and the a few baby bell peppers are beginning to peek out at us too. The other day I went to the Fabric shop and bought some sturdy netting to help build a cover over the tomato plant so the birds can't eat them this year. Hopefully this will work. As I was telling the Sales Lady who was cutting the yardage on my netting about using it to protect my tomatoes....she told me another woman had come in a few days before me and bought some for her blueberry plants as the birds were eating the blueberries that were blooming forth from them. :) I hope this is working for her and I sure hope it will work for us too.
     
    #16
    Don Alaska and Yvonne Smith like this.
  17. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    470
    Likes Received:
    587
    Boy, Babs, am I envious! We still have some snow on the ground and our soil is too wet and cold to even work it. I have a large greenhouse with raised tables that I have used for years to grow beans, herbs, and tomatoes. I went over there a few days ago (since the snow has gotten shallow enough to walk through without snowshoes) and discovered that one corner of one of my beds has collapsed. I will have to empty it and reconstruct the table.

    Do your birds have good access to water? I don't grow a lot of tomatoes outside but we always grow a few plants outside, and the birds have only bothered them in very dry years when they pole holes in the fruit to get the juice inside. Blueberries...and strawberries, currants, and cherries are a different matter. They will eat them all if given the chance. Good luck on sheltering your crops from the wildlife.
     
    #17
    Babs Hunt likes this.
  18. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2016
    Messages:
    6,718
    Likes Received:
    8,478

    We keep two bird baths full of water daily. My Honey is really good about refilling them if they get anywhere near empty as we like to see the birds play in the water too. :)

    Last year was the first year we had any problem with our tomatoes being eaten and we found out it was only the Mockingbirds that were doing this. I'm hoping this netting will take care of the problem.
     
    #18
    Don Alaska likes this.
  19. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2016
    Messages:
    6,718
    Likes Received:
    8,478
    I've got five tomatoes and five bell peppers all growing really well right now. :)
    IMG_0132.JPG IMG_0130.JPG
     
    #19
  20. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2016
    Messages:
    6,718
    Likes Received:
    8,478
    IMG_0150.JPG

    Well I'm got my netting around my tomato plant which now has six tomatoes growing. Hopefully the Mockingbirds will not be able to eat my tomatoes this year. :)
     
    #20
  21. Tom Galty

    Tom Galty Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2018
    Messages:
    90
    Likes Received:
    81
    Something I have never had is birds eating my tomatoes.

    What I have had down my allotment for the last few years is tomato blight.

    It normal hits in early September so I just strip all the plants before then.

    "Allotment" is land I rent off the local council to grow all my veg.
     
    #21
    Yvonne Smith likes this.
  22. Don Alaska

    Don Alaska Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Mar 6, 2018
    Messages:
    470
    Likes Received:
    587
    Tom, try to find blight tolerant or blight resistant tomatoes. In September, it should be Late Blight. I don't know what varieties are available to you, but here is the U.S. there are plenty available varieties that will resist Late Blight. You could also spray with a fungicide or Bordeaux Mixture.
     
    #22

Share This Page