Amazing Machines !

Discussion in 'Off-Topic Discussions' started by Frank Sanoica, Dec 11, 2019.

  1. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    8,161
    Likes Received:
    8,581
    This thing will eat and digest anything which will fit in it's maw! Even a complete motorcycle....as well as an oxygen tank first chopped into short pieces, a feat by itself.

     
    #1
  2. Beth Gallagher

    Beth Gallagher Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2018
    Messages:
    4,523
    Likes Received:
    8,605
    Hi Frank. I thought from the thread title that you were just very hungry, and I hoped that meant you were feeling better. :D
     
    #2
  3. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    8,161
    Likes Received:
    8,581
    @Beth Gallagher
    I am better, in a word, but only a little bit. Take my mind off things by engaging thoughts in unusual and weird things. Am also hungry just about constantly.

    Now, I spoke of seeing one of the following remarkable machines before, but could never find any good images, much less a video. Happened upon this one today. As told before, while we lived in Phoenix a crop-dusting company had several of these, which we happened to see by chance near our home, spraying cotton-fields. That was ~ 40 years ago. They routinely did things supposedly not possible, like looping upside down and over sidewise to engage the next rows planted. Long time getting spooled-up, if you are impatient, start at about 2:00 minutes.



    These things have TWO rotors which inter-leave one-another set at an angle between them; thus, they must always be "locked in step". There is NO tail rotor, a single gas-turbine (jet) engine, and make a strange sound in flight unlike the typical kind. Once, I watched one refueling and loading up with the poison the spray, right adjacent to a cross-roads, really a nice, rural area!
     
    #3
  4. Al Amoling

    Al Amoling Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Aug 20, 2016
    Messages:
    1,343
    Likes Received:
    2,869
    One of my grandsons was an Apache helicopter pilot during Iraq war. On one occasion he talked about the time that he flew an experimental captor. After he did it he said he'd never do it again because a lot of people died trying to pilot experimental coptors.
     
    #4
  5. Bob Kirk

    Bob Kirk Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2019
    Messages:
    389
    Likes Received:
    679
    About two episodes back on a Spanish Telenovela "La Reina del Sur" there was a similar machine used to grind whole pigs into tiny pieces. The plot was to kill La Reina by grinding her into little pieces. But luckily one of her old business partners saved her at the last second.

    The helo reference brought back a memory of when I was in the Navy. My job was in engine repair & replacement shop in the squadron I was stationed with. We had just replaced the engine in the helo. Test flying it was next, I was invited to ride along. Out over the ocean at 5000 ft. the pilot disengages the main rotor, the helo begins to fall like a rock even though the main rotor is in auto rotation <----- turning by itself. At that point seeing the ocean getting closer I was not happy with the invitation. Then at about 2000 ft. the pilot re-engaged the main rotor. Thankfully the connection held, the helo shuttered & shook but leveled out under control. Next invite was the T-28 trainer. Another invite I wish I hadn't accepted. After barrel rolls & other "training" maneuvers. I am happy for the puke bag doing what puke bags are designed for we landed.
     
    #5
    Frank Sanoica and Bess Barber like this.
  6. Bess Barber

    Bess Barber Very Well-Known Member
    Task Force Registered

    Joined:
    Jun 8, 2019
    Messages:
    3,760
    Likes Received:
    7,394
    Same here!! I figured the doctor's put @Frank Sanoica on some funky non-fulfilling diet.
     
    #6
    Frank Sanoica likes this.
  7. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    8,161
    Likes Received:
    8,581
    @Bob Kirk
    I believe, though I know very little about, what you described for rotor-blade craft, as being called "auto-rotation". The engine is manually disconnectable from the rotor drive system, thus allowing the rotors to "free-wheel" as air rushes past them. They build up speed, collecting rotational energy, as the craft basically falls from the sky. If the engine is dead, the skilled pilot can re-engage the rotors manually, which dumps the rotational energy into effort needed to turn the engine, like a big brake. That sudden slowing of the spinning rotors creates a huge upwards- directed cushioning force which can under perfect conditions lightly "bounce" the entire craft onto the ground.

    Highly skilled pilots are said to be able to do this procedure repeatedly safely.

    Not with me aboard! Frank
     
    #7
  8. Bob Kirk

    Bob Kirk Very Well-Known Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2019
    Messages:
    389
    Likes Received:
    679
    Frank what I described as an experience was due to the pilot shutting off the engine on purpose. That allowed the main rotor to free wheel or auto rotate. The drop like a rock was due to the time between the rotor blades not being power driven creating the downward thrust for lift to where free wheeling drives the rotor blades from the air pressure. Basically reversing how the blades are used to provide the lift.

    Then when the pilot restarted the engine that same reverse effect happened causing some shaking & vibration. Granted the auto rotation works well under the control of a skilled pilot to bring a helo to a soft landing. BUT & this makes a difference, we were over the ocean so a landing no matter how soft was not something I thought was going to be in my best interest.

    I didn't want this to take away from the original post describing how machinery can crunch metal into tiny shreds but somehow helo's were introduced so I thought why not share a life experience.
     
    #8
    Frank Sanoica likes this.
  9. Frank Sanoica

    Frank Sanoica Veteran Member
    Registered

    Joined:
    Feb 21, 2016
    Messages:
    8,161
    Likes Received:
    8,581
    @Bob Kirk
    We do seem away from the topic of scrap and junk destruction. But I suppose crashing a plane might be one way of disposing of it. I might get into the Auto-Gyro, a uniquely strange craft, which I have always hankered to build someday....
    Frank
    [​IMG]
     
    #9
    Bobby Cole likes this.

Share This Page