A Devotional I Read This A.m.

Discussion in 'Faith & Religion' started by Denise Happyfeet, May 31, 2016.

  1. Denise Happyfeet

    Denise Happyfeet Very Well-Known Member
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    I want to start my days with a devotional, and I found a site that lists devotionals from all, sorts of christian pastors. One of my faves has always been Chuck Swindol, so I chose to get his devo in my email. It was such a good read this a.m. for me. Sometimes I think nothing but negative about my past but this really lifted my spirits about it. I hope someone else may be helped by this:

    https://www.insight.org/resources/daily-devotional/individual/david's-unique-ability

    Here's the verses that went with it;)

    1 Samuel 16:16–18

    16 Let us find a good musician to play the harp whenever the tormenting spirit troubles you. He will play soothing music, and you will soon be well again.”

    17 “All right,” Saul said. “Find me someone who plays well, and bring him here.”

    18 One of the servants said to Saul, “One of Jesse’s sons from Bethlehem is a talented harp player. Not only that—he is a brave warrior, a man of war, and has good judgment. He is also a fine-looking young man, and the Lord is with him.”

    And here is another verse that's at the bottom and I copied it as a photo:

    Lk1.46-47.jpg
     
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  2. Denise Happyfeet

    Denise Happyfeet Very Well-Known Member
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    Music's Effective Ministry
    by Chuck Swindoll

    1 Samuel 16:21-23

    God had His hand on this young man whose music not only would fill the heart of a depressed king overwhelmed by blackness, but also would someday fill His written Word. Thus, David, with his primitive stringed instrument, walked bravely into that dark place where Saul was living.

    Saul was willing to try anything. "Provide a man," he says. "I don't care who it is. Bring him to me."

    Somehow David's music unleashed the caged feelings inside this tormented man and then soothed the savage beast within. By the time David left him, Saul was relieved. The evil presence had departed.

    God used the gift of music to put David into the very presence of the king's chamber. And the king not only found relief from his inner torturings, he found love in his heart for the young shepherd boy whose music touched his soul.

    The Spirit-filled saint is a song-filled saint. And your melody is broadcast right into heaven—live—where God's antenna is always receptive, where the soothing strains of your song are always appreciated.

    Never mind how beautiful or how pitiful you may sound. Sing loud enough to drown out those defeating thoughts that normally clamor for attention. Release yourself from that cage of introspective reluctance. SING OUT! SING OUT! You're not auditioning for the church choir; you're making melody with your heart to the Lord your God! If you listen closely when you're through, you may hear the hosts of heaven answering back for joy

    Soft music for a hard heart, that's what David provided for Saul. That's the soul music that Christ the Savior provides, and that's the place we all must begin. He died for us. He rose from the dead to give us the desire and the power to live a positive, fulfilling life free from the clutches of human depression and despair. He is our shepherd, and we are his sheep, needing the music of his voice. We can rejoice and exult in God together. Let's do more of it!

    Excerpted from Charles R. Swindoll, Great Days with the Great Lives (Nashville: W Publishing Group, 2005). Copyright © 2005 by Charles R. Swindoll, Inc. All rights reserved. Used by permission.
     
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  3. Denise Happyfeet

    Denise Happyfeet Very Well-Known Member
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    God vs. Our Giants


    June 02, 2016
    by Charles R. SwindollScriptures: 1 Samuel 17:1–16
    "There's no reason for your entire army to be involved in this. Just send a fighter, and I'll take him on. I am the champion. I am the greatest." Goliath didn't issue this challenge one time and then leave. No. His challenge went on for forty days (17:16). Every morning and every evening for well over a month, he strutted out there, flaunting his size and his strength, daring someone to take him on.

    How applicable to any "giant" we encounter! That's the way with the giants of fear and worry, for example. They don't come just once; they come morning and evening, day after day, relentlessly trying to intimidate. They come in the form of a person, a pressure, or a worry. Some of you have fear that hammers on your heart every morning and every night, day in and day out, yelling across the ravine in your own personal valley. Few things are more persistent and intimidating than our fears and our worries . . . especially when we face them in our own strength.

    I want to look again at something that occurred prior to that battle, when the Lord said to Samuel, "Do not look at his appearance or at the height of his stature, because I have rejected him; for God sees not as man sees, for man looks at the outward appearance, but the LORD looks at the heart" (1 Samuel 16:7). Literally, God said, "for man looks at the face, but the Lord looks at the heart."

    We, being human, are subject to that same problem. We are impressed with, or not impressed with, individuals because we judge on the basis of surface appearance. We look at the externals, and we form opinions that are usually erroneous.

    If God's statement ever applied, it applied in the story of this battle. Goliath had all the things that would normally impress and intimidate. In this instance, however, David had been given the ability to see as God always sees, and he was neither impressed nor intimidated. Because no matter how big the giant might be, God is greater. And no matter how powerful he might be, God is all-powerful.

    No matter how big your giant might be, God is greater. He’s all-powerful.

    — Charles R. Swindoll
    Excerpted from Charles R. Swindoll, Great Days with the Great Lives (Nashville: W Publishing Group, 2005). Copyright © 2005 by Charles R. Swindoll, Inc. All rights reserved. Used by permission.
     
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  4. Texas Beth

    Texas Beth Well-Known Member
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    Sometimes music does soothe the savage beast. I had a panic attack earlier today. They are no fun and are hard to deal with. My son found some soothing music and put his ear buds in my ears. It helped with my feelings of panic (or torment) and helped me to feel calm again.
     
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  5. Denise Happyfeet

    Denise Happyfeet Very Well-Known Member
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    I get the panic attacks, but not for awhile now. I also had what I called night-terrors. Just a horrible feeling of impending doom. They wouldn't last but a few minutes. I don't really know if they are related or not. I seem to be doing ok now, but music does help. It brings me back to reality.
     
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