20 Powerhouse Veggies That Prevent Chronic Disease

Discussion in 'Crops & Gardens' started by Diane Lane, Jun 1, 2016.

  1. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    The reason I'm putting this here, rather than in Health or Food, is because this could give us all some ideas of new crops to plant for the next growing season.

    I was familiar with how beneficial most of these were, but I was somewhat surprised to see red peppers and chicory in particular, on this list. We all know that greens are good for us, but now we know why so many Southerners typically cooked up a mess of turnip, mustard, and collard greens so often. It's also good to know there was a reason chicory was added to coffee, and why the mix is so popular. I've been wanting to grow some beets, but hadn't really considered using the greens, since I was focused on the beets, but this gives me added incentive to buy some seeds. I'd never considered growing arugula, but now it's something I'll consider.

    http://www.wcvb.com/health/20-powerhouse-veggies-that-prevent-chronic-disease/26423168
     
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  2. Ike Willis

    Ike Willis Very Well-Known Member
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    Interesting. When I read about the chicory I thought of Chester on the show 'Gunsmoke'. His coffee was always heavy on the chicory.:)
     
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  3. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    I know it's done a lot in Louisiana. I can recall during the coffee issue back in the 70s, my parents tried just about every substitute, and I believe chicory was one they tried, although I don't recall how they liked it. Barley was another, and I've tried that and like it.
     
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  4. Texas Beth

    Texas Beth Well-Known Member
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    Growing season started early where I live this year and I was able to grow lettuce. I would like to grow more in the autumn when the weather is cool. And I am glad that I planted red and yellow bell peppers.

    I tried brussel sprouts and broccoli last year without much success. (I may have tried growing them at the wrong time of year or the wrong place in my backyard.) Does anyone know if spinach is a cool or warm weather vegetable?
     
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  5. Diane Lane

    Diane Lane Very Well-Known Member
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    I second the question about spinach. I love Brussels sprouts and broccoli, but they don't love me, so I'd better not tempt myself by growing them. Spinach seems o.k., and I'd love to grow some of that, since I use it quite a bit. Red and yellow bell peppers sound like a nice garden addition, they're so flavorful and colorful, to boot. This year seems a bust with my garden, but maybe next year will be better, or perhaps I can grow something in the Fall.
     
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  6. Babs Hunt

    Babs Hunt Veteran Member
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    I believe spinach is a cool weather green. :)
     
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  7. Arlene Richards

    Arlene Richards Very Well-Known Member
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    I love Chinese cabbage. Great for salads, sandwiches, and keeps longer than regular lettuce.
     
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